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October 14, 2019, 05:33:06 pm

Author Topic: VCE Physics Question Thread!  (Read 253698 times)  Share 

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harold17

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2295 on: August 28, 2019, 12:06:07 pm »
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Anyone with good marks want to sell me their scientific poster

ImproviseAdaptOvercome

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2296 on: August 28, 2019, 04:48:47 pm »
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I'm in Yr 11 doing 3/4 physics so I have some time in my hands. Can anyone recommend good resources to prepare for my first VCE exam? I am really nervous...

S200

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2297 on: August 28, 2019, 06:15:23 pm »
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I'm in Yr 11 doing 3/4 physics so I have some time in my hands. Can anyone recommend good resources to prepare for my first VCE exam? I am really nervous...
best resource I can give is the VCAA exams from the past few years and the VCAA NHT exams from the same period.
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milanander

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2298 on: August 29, 2019, 11:11:45 pm »
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best resource I can give is the VCAA exams from the past few years and the VCAA NHT exams from the same period.

I know commercial resources get a bad rap (and some for good reason), but do you think there are some companies that actually produce resources on par or at least close to VCAA's standards? Cheers.
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Sine

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2299 on: August 29, 2019, 11:44:16 pm »
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I know commercial resources get a bad rap (and some for good reason), but do you think there are some companies that actually produce resources on par or at least close to VCAA's standards? Cheers.
I didn't do physics but for most other subjects imo rarely do company's produce exams at VCAA standard - however at both ends of the spectrum, either too easy or too hard. Some companies that do get close to VCAA lack the ability to produce good separator questions and usually just copy last years VCAA seperator question (or something from previous years). So usually teachers will focus on past exam concepts and what past students found difficult on the older exams so once it is time to complete these company exams those seperator questions are not too bad. Same goes if the student completes the past VCAA exams before the certain company exams - they have learnt about the "trick" required to solve the separator question before seeing it in the company exam. So really the biggest problem is the lack of creativity for those separator questions. The easy-moderate difficult questions on VCAA exams are easier to replicate because most peopel should be getting those right.

Tau

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2300 on: August 30, 2019, 12:17:21 am »
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I know commercial resources get a bad rap (and some for good reason), but do you think there are some companies that actually produce resources on par or at least close to VCAA's standards? Cheers.

From my experience doing trial papers last year, I have to say that the average quality of the papers was appalling. Riddled with mistakes, ambiguous question, misleading statements etc.

My recommendation would be to prioritise the VCAA exams instead. (Even the Checkpoints Questions that weren’t written by VCAA were of a much poorer standard, and often had mistakes in them)

(In Physics they don’t really tend to ask ‘separator’ questions as much as in maths subjects)
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Just another student

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2301 on: August 30, 2019, 08:07:36 pm »
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From my experience doing trial papers last year, I have to say that the average quality of the papers was appalling. Riddled with mistakes, ambiguous question, misleading statements etc.











Great job on your physics score. Did you only do VCAA exams to revise or company ones too? If i many ask how many exams did u do?
« Last Edit: August 30, 2019, 08:09:24 pm by Just another student »

Tau

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2302 on: August 30, 2019, 08:27:41 pm »
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Great job on your physics score. Did you only do VCAA exams to revise or company ones too? If i many ask how many exams did u do?

Cheers, I started off with company exams, and then dropped that when I realised it wasn't particularly beneficial. I probably sat about 6 full VCAA exams, but I did Checkpoints and went through a bunch of relevant questions from past study designs.
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Just another student

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2303 on: September 28, 2019, 07:51:14 am »
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Hi everyone,

I have printed all the VCAA exams from 2002. However it looks like there is barely any relevant questions. From which year would you recommend starting VCAA exams?

Thanks

Ninjamagics

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2304 on: October 10, 2019, 05:27:59 pm »
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A am struggling with an approach towards area under the graph questions.
I feel like although i seem to get them right, I lack a structure or approach to finding what the area of the graph actually means

Erutepa

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2305 on: October 10, 2019, 06:07:37 pm »
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Hi everyone,

I have printed all the VCAA exams from 2002. However it looks like there is barely any relevant questions. From which year would you recommend starting VCAA exams?

Thanks
For myself, the real point of doing practice exams is to simulate the real exam. As such, since all the exams before 2017 used a completely different structure, I haven't been doing any of them. I have only been doing exams from 2017 onwards and have only done company exams so far as I am saving the VCAA ones till last. You should be able to get yourself some relevant company exams from your teacher.

In Terms of the earlier exams, they are still useful, however moreso as a source of practice for content knowledge and lesser for doing as a timed exam and I have been relevant questions from these exams mainly through my checkpoint book throughout the year.

So I would recommend sticking to the 2017 and onwards exams for timed exams, and using those older exams just for practicing content knowledge if you need it. However, that is just my opinion and other may beg to differ. :)

A am struggling with an approach towards area under the graph questions.
I feel like although i seem to get them right, I lack a structure or approach to finding what the area of the graph actually means
Here is a list of all the relevant area under the graphs that I can think of
 - Area under a velocity time graph = displacement/distance (note that if the velocity time graph goes in the positive and the negative, the displacement is given as the magnitude of the area made by the positive velocity - the magnitude of the area made by the negative velocity, and the distance is given by the magnitude of the area made by the positive velocity + the magnitude of the area made by the negative velocity)
 - Area under acceleration-time graph = velocity
 - Area under force-time graph is the impulse
 - Area under a force extension graph (for a spring) = change in spring potential energy
 - Area under a gravitational force-radius graph = change in gravitational potential energy

Hopefully this makes sense, and if I have missed any graphs you should know, hopefully others can add them.
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blyatman

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2306 on: October 10, 2019, 10:06:59 pm »
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A am struggling with an approach towards area under the graph questions.
I feel like although i seem to get them right, I lack a structure or approach to finding what the area of the graph actually means
It sucks that they don't teach calculus in physics, because it would make stuff like this more intuitive.
\(v=\frac{dx}{dt}\), so \(dx = v \,dt\), and hence \(x=\int v\,dt\)
So, the area under a velocity curve is equal to the change in displacement.

Likewise, for the area under the gravitational force curve as a function of radius: the force is equal to negative of the rate of change of the potential, i.e. \(F=-\frac{d\Phi}{dr}\), so \(F\,dr = -d\Phi\), i.e. \(\int F\,dr = -\Phi\). So the area under the gravtiational force curve is equal to the negative of the change in potential energy.

You can obtain similar expressions for the other variables to figure out what the area under the curve represents.
« Last Edit: October 10, 2019, 10:19:35 pm by blyatman »
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