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Author Topic: Henry IV Text Essay!  (Read 2630 times)  Share 

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cbf

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Henry IV Text Essay!
« on: October 30, 2012, 11:23:07 pm »
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I welcome any criticisms from all, this was done under exam conditions. Thanks!

Despite what the title suggests, Henry IV is far less important to the play’s drama than Hal, Hotspur and Falstaff. Discuss.

In his seriocomic history play, Shakespeare depicts the drama in the year leading to a prolonged civil war in medieval England. Indeed, the drama stems for a variety of sources, names the illegitimacy of King Henry IV’s reign, which creates an unstable political environment and thus brooding rebellion. Whilst Hotspur and Henry play significant roles in this overarching plot, it is the subplot of a wayward prince’s education which compounds upon the tensions raised from the rebellion. Here, Hal takes centre as the outcome of the war becomes increasingly dependent on his rejection of Falstaff and the anarchic spirit of life that Falstaff embodies. In this sense, Falstaff is more important in trivialising the drama rather than building upon it. Essentially, the title is appropriate as Henry IV is the catalyst for drama within the play, however as the intricacies of the play unfold the audience may see Hal as the instigator in building upon the tension.

It becomes clear from the onset of the play that Henry IV’s usurpation of the throne is the cause for drama throughout the kingdom. Indeed, even he has grown “wan with care” and seeks to avoid this conflict by unifying the kingdom in fulfilling their religious role “to chase these pagans in those holy fields”. Yet whilst Henry appears to be discontented by the ongoing conflict, he displays political inaptness, unlike his nature, to insult the nation’s most revered knight Hotspur, addressing him as “sirrah” and tarnishing Mortimer’s name as “revolted” and “foolish”. Indeed, the very act of usurping the throne has inevitably created distrust among him and his former supporters – the Percy’s – thereby leading to more drama as Henry looks to affirm his position. Worcester acknowledges that the King will always think “of us in his debt” and hence the rebellion is seemingly unavoidable as by breaking the ecclesiastical belief of the King’s divine right, Henry has broken the ability for any trust to exist. Henry IV is certainly important in the instigation of the play’s drama – his deposing of Richard II had broken the founding beliefs which dictated England and her children.

Hotspur as the figurehead of the rebellion and the embodiment of valour and chivalry is vital to the play’s drama. Shakespeare creates an awkward tension as Hotspurt’s absolute desire to be the “King of Honour” supercedes his own consideration for safety. Thus, if it was not for Hotspur’s desire to “stir” his blood by rousing a “lion than to start a hare”, the rebellion’s cause would be less dramatic. Hotspur  portrayed to be the rival of the Prince, also represents an obstacle for Hal to overcome as the events of the play culminate in the play’s denouement where they engage in a final battle. If it was not for “gallant Hotspur, this all-praised Knight” there would not be anyone for Hal to battle in order to redeem himself. Hence, Hotspur plays an important function in building drama by leading the rebellion but also representing the obstacle for Hal.

The dilemma that faces Hal who has to choose between two worlds and thus essentially two divergent philosophies of life compounds the drama developed by the rebellion. Whilst from the beginning Hal indicates his desire for a “glittering” “reformation” and intentions to redeem “time when men think I will”, the audience is invited to question the veracity of his soliloquy as it is difficult to accept that he does not genuinely enjoy himself in Eastcheap. Thus as we see Hal weave between two disparate worlds, tension is built as it becomes increasingly apparent that the outcome of the rebellion lies solely in his decision to choose one of the other. Indeed, it is once Hal “rises from the ground like feather Mercury” that the drama of the play seems resolved. Hence, whilst Henry’s reign remains in dispute, it ultimately comes down to Hal, as the heir, to be the savior and whether he will do so is a source of drama throughout the play.

Whilst Falstaff is often hailed as the great comedic figure, we should not ignore his role in building the play’s drama. Whilst being the “fat rogue” and “white bearded Satan” it is essential to recognise the questions raised by Falstaff as he subverts the social norm of the moral and just way of journeying through life. This is especially pertinent given that, although he is the antithesis of the play’s leaders in Henry and Hotpsur, he also shares common features. The play’s drama extends to the audience as Shakespeare poses the questions whether Falstaff’s blatant honesty to “live by [his] vocation” is a sin or not. Indeed, his unscrupulous behavior is matched by the Machiavellian politicians who seek only to further their own means. It is also of vital significance that Falstaff is also able to achieve some sense of happiness unlike his political counterparts. Hence, Shakespeare uses Falstaff as a vehicle to not only act as the Vice and create drama for Hal who has to eventually “banish plump Jack” but leaves the audience with considerable afterthoughts on whether they would have done the same.

Essentially, it would be remiss to suggest that a single character is more important than another in Henry IV: Part One. Particularly the four main characters play a defining and varying function in contributing to the play’s drama within and also for the audience. Indeed, Shakespeare’s ultimate challenge to the audience is whether they will pursue a life of freedom that is rife with dishonor

brenden

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Re: Henry IV Text Essay!
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2012, 11:47:51 pm »
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I welcome any criticisms from all, this was done under exam conditions. Thanks!

Despite what the title suggests, Henry IV is far less important to the play’s drama than Hal, Hotspur and Falstaff. Discuss.

In his seriocomic history play, Shakespeare depicts the drama in the year leading to a prolonged civil war in medieval England. Indeed, the drama stems for a variety of sources, namesthis sentence doesn't make sense to me because of this word the illegitimacy of King Henry IV’s reign, which creates an unstable political environment and thus brooding rebellion.sounds great so far! Whilst Hotspur and Henry play significant roles in this overarching plot, it is the subplot of a wayward prince’s education which compounds upon the tensions raised from the rebellion. Here, Hal takes centre as the outcome of the war becomes increasingly dependent on his rejection of Falstaff and the anarchic spirit of life that Falstaff embodies. In this sense, Falstaff is more important in trivialising the drama rather than building upon it. Essentially, the title is appropriate as Henry IV is the catalyst for drama within the play, however as the intricacies of the play unfold the audience may see Hal as the instigator in building upon the tension.Awesome intro. Can't fault it except for the weird sentence.

It becomes clear from the onset of the play that Henry IV’s usurpation of the throne is the cause for drama throughout the kingdom. Indeedsecond time you've followed a sentence with this. I WILL BE WATCHING YOU, CBF!, even he has grown “wan with care” and seeks to avoid this conflict by unifying the kingdom in fulfilling their religious role “to chase these pagans in those holy fields”. Yet whilst Henry appears to be discontented by the ongoing conflict, he displays political inaptness, unlike his nature, to insult the nation’s most revered knight Hotspur, addressing him as “sirrah” and tarnishing Mortimer’s name as “revolted” and “foolish”.It's still great but seemed just a slight tad disjointed to me because of the commas Indeedgotchya. getting repetitive now, the very act of usurping the throne has inevitably created distrust among him and his former supporters – the Percy’s – thereby leading to more drama as Henry looks to affirm his position. Worcester acknowledges that the King will always think “of us in his debt” and hence the rebellion is seemingly unavoidable as by breaking the ecclesiastical belief of the King’s divine rightbeast., Henry has broken the ability for any trust to exist. Henry IV is certainly important in the instigation of the play’s drama – his deposing of Richard II had broken the founding beliefs which dictated England and her children. Can't fault it bar the prevalence of 'indeed'

Hotspur as the figurehead of the rebellion and the embodiment of valour and chivalry is vital to the play’s drama. great!Shakespeare creates an awkward tension as Hotspurt’s absolute desire to be the “King of Honour” supercedes his own consideration for safety. Thus, if it was not for Hotspur’s desire to “stir” his blood by rousing a “lion than to start a hare”, the rebellion’s cause would be less dramatic. Hotspur  portrayed to be the rival of the Prince, also represents an obstacle for Hal to overcome as the events of the play culminate in the play’s denouementsha-weet! where they engage in a final battle. If it was not for “gallant Hotspur, this all-praised Knight” there would not be anyone for Hal to battle in order to redeem himself. Hence, Hotspur plays an important function in building drama by leading the rebellion but also representing the obstacle for Hal. Legit as

The dilemma that faces Hal who has to choose between two worlds and thus essentially two divergent philosophies of life compounds the drama developed by the rebellion. Whilst from the beginning Hal indicates his desire for a “glittering” “reformation” and intentions to redeem “time when men think I will”, the audience is invited to question the veracity of his soliloquy as it is difficult to accept that he does not genuinely enjoy himself in Eastcheap. Thus as we see Hal weave between two disparate worlds, tension is built as it becomes increasingly apparent that the outcome of the rebellion lies solely in his decision to choose one of the other. Indeed, it is once Hal “rises from the ground like feather Mercury” that the drama of the play seems resolved. Hence, whilst Henry’s reign remains in dispute, it ultimately comes down to Hal, as the heir, to be the savior and whether he will do so is a source of drama throughout the play. seems short but this is balanced by 4 bodies, i reckon

Whilst Falstaff is often hailed as the great comedic figure, we I've been taught none of this, dunno about you. Would be easy to change it to "his role in building the play's drama should not be ignored should not ignore his role in building the play’s drama. Whilst being the “fat rogue” and “white bearded Satan” it is essential to recognise the questions raised by Falstaff as he subverts the social norm of the moral and just way of journeying through lifeI wish we could do ticks over the internet. This is especially pertinent given that, although he is the antithesis of the play’s leaders in Henry and Hotpsur, he also shares common features. The play’s drama extends to the audience as Shakespeare poses the questions whether Falstaff’s blatant honesty to “live by [his] vocation” is a sin or not. Indeed, his unscrupulous behavior is matched by the Machiavellian politicians who seek only to further their own means. It is also of vital significance that Falstaff is also able to achieve some sense of happiness unlike his political counterparts. Hence, Shakespeare uses Falstaff as a vehicle to not only act as the Vice and create drama for Hal who has to eventually “banish plump Jack” but leaves the audience with considerable afterthoughts on whether they would have done the same.

Essentially, it would be remiss to suggest that a single character is more important than another in Henry IV: Part One. Particularly the four main characters play a defining and varying function in contributing to the play’s drama within and also for the audience. Indeed, Shakespeare’s ultimate challenge to the audience is whether they will pursue a life of freedom that is rife with dishonor
9-10/10. I couldn't really give you much more feedback as far as your essay etc goes. I don't know whether there were better examples etc but this is preeeettttty damn beast.
✌️just do what makes you happy ✌️

cbf

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Re: Henry IV Text Essay!
« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2012, 12:06:56 am »
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sorry that was meant to be namely...and cheers yeah I do tend to say indeed a lot

cbf

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Re: Henry IV Text Essay!
« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2012, 08:53:51 am »
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Essentially, it would be remiss to suggest that a single character is more important than another in Henry IV: Part One. Particularly the four main characters play a defining and varying function in contributing to the play’s drama within and also for the audience. Indeed, Shakespeare’s ultimate challenge to the audience is whether they will pursue a life of freedom that is rife with dishonor or a life of honour coveted with deceit and manipulation.

forgot one part of the conclusion

Applebottom

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Re: Henry IV Text Essay!
« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2013, 07:04:12 pm »
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I would consider defining drama before you enter into something like this.
it's very well written but it seems like you're just showing off your knowledge of the play
If you had clearly stated what drama is to you thus giving yourself some for of guidance
and then shown how characters relationships (not character!) and the class system and prior actions create this drama
then it would be a solid 9/10

But yeah great job!
Also if you're writing for king Henry in the exam its a god idea to have your own personal interpretation of the play seep a little into your writing. Doing the same thing everyone else does will cause a subtle mark change.

Applebottom

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Re: Henry IV Text Essay!
« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2013, 07:07:33 pm »
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Oh wow didn't read the post date, well I hope you did well in your exam :P