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Author Topic: Henry IV Part 1 Essay 4  (Read 4510 times)  Share 

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Shenz0r

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Henry IV Part 1 Essay 4
« on: October 09, 2012, 05:42:02 pm »
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Hey guys, this is my 4th essay for Henry IV. I'm a little concerned about the conclusion in this essay, it seems weaker compared to the other parts of the essay.
Word length: 1314

Falstaff is more of a father to Hal than Henry is. Do you agree?

Set during the political and social unrest of early 15th-century England, William Shakespeare’s historical play, Henry IV Part 1, demonstrates the influence of our patriarchal relationships on our actions and identity. Falstaff stands above the crumbling world of nobility and lawless rebels in his egotistic desire to whore, eat, and sleep in the unruly environment of the Eastcheap tavern. His warmth and friendship towards Prince Hal, “the blessed sun of heaven”, allows Hal to escape from his cold and disapproving relationship with his biological father, Henry IV. However, due to Falstaff’s corrupted nature, Shakespeare insinuates that his riotous actions may cause Hal to follow his crude examples and to descend into moral depravity. Furthermore, it is Henry IV’s hopes and expectations of Hal’s nobility which drive the young prince’s ambition for glory, allowing Hal to cultivate the necessary leadership and bravery required from a future king. Therefore, Falstaff’s immoral behaviour at the tavern becomes increasingly incompatible with Hal’s development as a prince, and thus Hal must rid himself of Falstaff’s fatherly influence before he is to begin acting regally.
 
Hal’s close relationship with Falstaff at the tavern undermines the moral righteousness that he must exhibit as a prince. Due to his lowly interactions at the tavern, Prince Hal is seen by Hotspur as a “nimble-footed madcap” and the “same sword-and-buckler Prince of Wales”. Hotspur’s allusion to poverty debases Hal’s perceived capacity as a prince, as he is seen as belonging to the lawless underworld of the tavern. The unruly environment of iniquity at the tavern disconnects Hal from the courtly chivalry one typically associates with royalty, causing Hal to descend into ethical depravity. Falstaff questions Hal’s nobility in his line “the true prince may – for recreation’s sake – prove a small thief”. Thus, Shakespeare presents Hal’s interest, and his identity, as influenced by the people who he befriends. Even the most aristocratic individuals may succumb to “lewd” acts such as robbery, and Falstaff plays a pivotal role in coercing Hal to commit crimes solely for the sake of pleasure. In the same vein, Hal is clearly aware of Falstaff’s unscrupulous influence on his conscience, condemning him as a “villainous abominable misleader of youth”, and an “old white-bearded Satan”. Through Hal’s portrayal of Falstaff as a “devil”, Shakespeare presents Falstaff as a detrimental influence towards youth’s pure-hearted innocence, as he imposes callous ideals on those that fall victim to his parenthood. While this epitomises Falstaff’s chaotic nature, it also denigrates Falstaff’s capacity for fatherhood, due to his detestable actions. Hal further emphasises Falstaff’s malign influence at the tavern, claiming that “there’s no room for faith, truth, nor honesty in [that] bosom of [his]. It is all filled with guts and midriff”. Hal’s allusion towards Falstaff’s greed implies that Falstaff finds it acceptable to replace his altruistic values with his thirst for timeless pleasure. Consequently, Falstaff’s hedonistic lifestyle contributes towards his malign influence on Hal’s morals.

 For Shakespeare, it is Hal’s intrinsic desire to live up to the expectations of his true father, King Henry, which ultimately forces the unveiling of his true, noble character. Henry is plagued with disappointment over his own son’s debauchery; he rebukes Hal in stinging language due to his public interactions at the tavern, belittling him as the “shadow of succession” and a “revengement” from God to punish Henry. This portrays Hal as a counterfeit who does not rightfully deserve his “princely privileged”, and as a result, “the soul of every man prophetically do forethink [his] fall”.  Henry’s cold attitude towards Hal is so intense that he wishes “some night tripping fairy” had mistakenly exchanged both Hotspur and Hal when they were babies. One’s achievements and “glorious deeds” is pivotal for their nobility; It is Hotspur’s honour which makes him “more worthy” and fit to be a king. Subsequently, Hal wants to redeem his position by cleaning himself of the “shame” he has accumulated at the tavern by wearing a “garment full of blood” and acquiring all of Hotspur’s “glorious deeds” by defeating him in battle. His words and intentions are an emblematic portrayal of the natural tension between his behaviour and the kingly duties that he is to assume. Seeing Hal accompany his father to the battlefield, Vernon paints a dazzling picture of Hal riding into battle “gallantly armed” and “glittering in goal coasts”. As an audience, we cannot deny the charm of his nobility, as we witness him depart from his previous life of “such barren pleasures” to the prince who “England did never owe so sweet a hope”. Moreover, his desire to challenge Hotspur for his glory and honour highlights the fact that Hal wishes to prove his royalty through heroic actions, simply because he views nobility as something that is earned from valour, rather than something that is bequeathed by blood inheritance. Hal tells his father that after he defeats Hotspur “he [will] be bold enough to tell [him] that [he] is [Henry’s] son”. Such behaviour earns Hal the respect of Henry, who, instead of referring to him as his “nearest and dearest enemy” as before, affectionately calls him “Son Harry”. Thus, Henry’s parental pressure towards Hal allows him the opportunity to develop emotional maturity and leadership.

Hal’s inevitable development from his previous life of debauchery forces Falstaff to becoming increasingly estranged from him, as Falstaff begins to lose his influence over him. Hal is aware of the “inordinate” image that he publically projects due to his relationship with Falstaff, but he vows to abandon the heinous nature of the tavern in order to assume his “princely privileges”. He juxtaposes himself with the “beauty [of the] sun”, which is smothered by the “foul and ugly mists” of the “contagious clouds” in the tavern. The image of disease further accentuates Falstaff’s moral corruption, while the sun’s radiance ensures the audience that Hal will be a sovereign free of iniquity. These two contrasting qualities cannot co-exist, and thus Hal’s eventual plan to banish Falstaff and the rest of his “unrestrained loose companions” arises from the fact that they reflect his “displeasing” image. He will seek to eliminate Falstaff, who will “strangle” the stability of his reign, demonstrating that his friendship with Falstaff is detrimental towards his capacity as a king. His changed attitude of condemnation towards Falstaff slowly develops after Hal vows to fulfil his father’s expectations, as he denounces Falstaff as a “whoreson impudent embossed rascal” who “will not pocket to the wrong”.  In the middle of the Battle of Shrewsbury, as Hal visibly expresses his frustration towards Falstaff’s cowardice, angrily throwing his bottle of sack at him. While he has maintained a warm amity with Falstaff at the tavern, Hal finds himself unable to further tolerate Falstaff’s excessively low behaviour, exclaiming that it is not the “time to jest and dally”. Thus, as Hal develops a mature understanding of morality, he finds himself unable to be in Falstaff’s presence, and he becomes increasingly attached to the kingly role which he is to assume from his Henry.

Shakespeare asserts that Hal’s relationship with Falstaff damages Hal’s moral rectitude, as a result of his Falstaff’s malice towards other people. Yet, because Hal wishes to establish himself as a suitable prince to Henry, he is able to preserve his noble character and hence warmly welcomes his father’s recognition of his own honourable achievements during the rebellion. However, as Hal develops into his royal stature, Falstaff’s influence on Hal begins to diminish as Hal fears that his associations with Falstaff will contribute to the instability of his future reign. Thus, Henry IV Part 1 thus demonstrates that a true father like Henry will have the power to drive their son’s motivations, enabling them to undergo change, whereas the corrupt substitute fathers like Falstaff will be cast aside when they are no longer seen as influential.
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Destiny

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Re: Henry IV Part 1 Essay 4
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2012, 05:24:40 pm »
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Falstaff is more of a father to Hal than Henry is. Do you agree?

Set during the political and social unrest of early 15th-century England, William Shakespeare’s historical play, Henry IV Part 1, demonstrates the influence of our patriarchal relationships on our actions and identity. Falstaff stands above the crumbling world of nobility and lawless rebels in his egotistic desire to whore, eat, and sleep in the unruly environment of the Eastcheap tavern. His warmth and friendship towards Prince Hal, “the blessed sun of heaven”, allows Hal to escape from his cold and disapproving relationship with his biological father, Henry IV. - Too much textual detail in an introduction However, due to Falstaff’s corrupted nature, Shakespeare insinuates that his riotous actions may cause Hal to follow his crude examples and to descend into moral depravity. Furthermore, it is Henry IV’s hopes and expectations of Hal’s nobility which drive the young prince’s ambition for glory, allowing Hal to cultivate the necessary leadership and bravery required from a future king. Therefore, Falstaff’s immoral behaviour at the tavern becomes increasingly incompatible with Hal’s development as a prince, and thus Hal must rid himself of Falstaff’s fatherly influence before he is to begin acting regally. - Bad expression. He can begin to act regally
 
Hal’s close relationship with Falstaff at the tavern undermines the moral righteousness - What? Righteous already suggests moral principles, would you want to talk about moral, moral principles? Delete that he must exhibit as a prince. Due to his lowly interactions at the tavern, Prince Hal is seen by Hotspur as a “nimble-footed madcap” and the “same sword-and-buckler Prince of Wales”. Hotspur’s allusion to poverty - I see that one quote relates to poverty, the other doesn't. debases Hal’s perceived capacity - What capacity? as a prince, as he is seen as belonging to the lawless underworld of the tavern - How is he seen at the tavern?. The unruly environment of iniquity at the tavern disconnects Hal from the courtly chivalry one typically associates with royalty, causing Hal to descend into ethical depravity - Word overdose. What are you saying, without using 5 billion words to express the same statement?. Falstaff questions Hal’s nobility in his line “the true prince may – for recreation’s sake – prove a small thief”. Thus, Shakespeare presents Hal’s interest, and his identity, as influenced by the people who he befriends - This relates to moral righteousness how?. Even the most aristocratic individuals - Which individuals? may succumb to “lewd” acts such as robbery, and Falstaff plays a pivotal role in coercing- When Hal says that he will 'so offend to make offense a skill', does that sound like coercion? Wrong use of the word. Hal to commit crimes solely for the sake of pleasure. In the same vein, Hal is clearly aware of Falstaff’s unscrupulous influence on his conscience, condemning him as a “villainous abominable misleader of youth”, and an “old white-bearded Satan”. Through Hal’s portrayal of Falstaff as a “devil”, Shakespeare presents Falstaff as a detrimental influence towards youth’s pure-hearted innocence - Prove that he's pure-hearted and innocent, as he imposes callous ideals - either prove it, or don't use this word at all on those that fall victim to his parenthood. While this epitomises Falstaff’s chaotic nature, it also denigrates Falstaff’s capacity for fatherhood, due to his detestable actions. Hal further emphasises Falstaff’s malign influence at the tavern, claiming that “there’s no room for faith, truth, nor honesty in [that] bosom of [his]. It is all filled with guts and midriff” - Quote too long, latter part irrelevant.. Hal’s allusion towards Falstaff’s greed implies that Falstaff finds it acceptable to replace his altruistic values with his thirst for timeless pleasure This relates to Hal, how?. Consequently, Falstaff’s hedonistic lifestyle contributes towards his malign influence on Hal’s morals.

 For Shakespeare, it is Hal’s intrinsic desire to live up to the expectations of his true father, King Henry, which ultimately forces the unveiling of his true, noble character Nothing to do with the topic. In what way are they fathery, apart from a word drop about expectations? . Henry is plagued with disappointment over his own son’s debauchery; he rebukes Hal in stinging language Most fathers do this. due to his public interactions at the tavern, belittling him as the “shadow of succession” and a “revengement” from God to punish Henry. This portrays Hal as a counterfeit who does not rightfully deserve his “princely privileged”, and as a result, “the soul of every man prophetically do forethink [his] fall”. How does this relate to the topic?  Henry’s cold attitude towards Hal is so intense that he wishes “some night tripping fairy” had mistakenly exchanged both Hotspur and Hal when they were babies A bit more analysis is good. One’s achievements and “glorious deeds” is pivotal for their nobility; It is Hotspur’s honour which makes him “more worthy” and fit to be a king. Not on topic. I don't care about Hotspur's upbringing. Father son relationship between Hal and Henry? The examiner won't give a  ***k if Hotspur is an ideal king or not. TOPIC Subsequently, Hal wants to redeem his position by cleaning himself of the “shame” he has accumulated at the tavern by wearing a “garment full of blood” and acquiring all of Hotspur’s “glorious deeds” by defeating him in battle So, Father/Son relationship?. His words and intentions are an emblematic portrayal of the natural tension between his behaviour and the kingly duties that he is to assume Nothing to do with father/son relationship. Seeing Hal accompany his father to the battlefield, Vernon paints a dazzling picture of Hal riding into battle “gallantly armed” and “glittering in goal coasts” Narration, get rid of it. I don't care about the plot.. As an audience, we cannot deny the charm of his nobility, as we witness him depart from his previous life of “such barren pleasures” to the prince who “England did never owe so sweet a hope”Which is not related to the topic. Moreover, his desire to challenge Hotspur for his glory and honour highlights the fact that Hal wishes to prove his royalty through heroic actions, simply because he views nobility as something that is earned from valour, rather than something that is bequeathed by blood inheritance WHAT TYPE OF FATHER IS HENRY? ADDRESS THE TOPIC. Hal tells his father that after he defeats Hotspur “he [will] be bold enough to tell [him] that [he] is [Henry’s] son”. FINALLLY. Such behaviour earns Hal the respect of Henry, who, instead of referring to him as his “nearest and dearest enemy” as before, affectionately calls him “Son Harry” <3 But is Henry still Hal's father or not?. Thus, Henry’s parental pressure towards Hal allows him the opportunity to develop emotional maturity and leadership.

Hal’s inevitable development from his previous life of debauchery forces Falstaff to becoming increasingly estranged from him, as Falstaff begins to lose his influence over him Unclear. How is Falstaff a father figure?. Hal is aware of the “inordinate” image that he publically projects due to his relationship with Falstaff, but he vows to abandon the heinous nature of the tavern in order to assume his “princely privileges” Nothing to do with father/on relationships. He juxtaposes himself with the “beauty [of the] sun”, which is smothered by the “foul and ugly mists” of the “contagious clouds” in the tavern Nothing to do with father/son relationships -.-. The image of disease further accentuates Falstaff’s moral corruption, while the sun’s radiance ensures the audience that Hal will be a sovereign free of iniquity Analysing the character, but not analysing it in relation to the topic. These two contrasting qualities cannot co-exist, and thus Hal’s eventual plan to banish Falstaff and the rest of his “unrestrained loose companions” arises from the fact that they reflect his “displeasing” image Narration. He will seek to eliminate Falstaff, who will “strangle” the stability of his reign, demonstrating that his friendship with Falstaff is detrimental towards his capacity as a king. If you find it difficult to actually analyse the topic, use the word 'relationship' His changed attitude of condemnation towards Falstaff slowly develops after Hal vows to fulfil his father’s expectations, as he denounces Falstaff as a “whoreson impudent embossed rascal” who “will not pocket to the wrong” Is their relationship father son?.  In the middle of the Battle of Shrewsbury, as Hal visibly expresses his frustration towards Falstaff’s cowardice, angrily throwing his bottle of sack at him. Is this the behaviour of the son to his father?While he has maintained a warm amity ... is 'warm amity' a father/son relationship? I certainly hope not. with Falstaff at the tavern, Hal finds himself unable to further tolerate Falstaff’s excessively low behaviour, exclaiming that it is not the “time to jest and dally”. Thus, as Hal develops a mature understanding of morality, he finds himself unable to be in Falstaff’s presence, and he becomes increasingly attached to the kingly role which he is to assume from his Henry. A better end sentence would be: 'Thus, Henry/Falstaff is a father to Hal in the sense that...

Shakespeare asserts that Hal’s relationship with Falstaff damages Hal’s moral rectitude, as a result of his Falstaff’s malice towards other people Not relating to the topic. FATHER FIGURE OR NOT?. Yet, because Hal wishes to establish himself as a suitable prince to Henry, he is able to preserve his noble character and hence warmly welcomes his father’s recognition of his own honourable achievements during the rebellion. However, as Hal develops into his royal stature, Falstaff’s influence on Hal begins to diminish as Hal fears that his associations with Falstaff will contribute to the instability of his future reign. Thus, Henry IV Part 1 thus demonstrates that a true father like Henry will have the power to drive their son’s motivations, enabling them to undergo change, whereas the corrupt substitute fathers like Falstaff will be cast aside when they are no longer seen as influential. Your end sentence is the only sentence which strongly relates to the topic.

Score: 4/10
All the nice words in heaven won't help you if your essay doesn't strongly relate to the topic.

nisha

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Re: Henry IV Part 1 Essay 4
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2012, 06:03:36 pm »
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Can you write something of that word length in the exam in an hour or less? You need to think practically as well, and focus on ideas rather than beautiful language.
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