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August 12, 2020, 04:37:59 pm

Author Topic: Stoichiometric formulas for Unit 4 Chemistry  (Read 2658 times)  Share 

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charmanderp

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Stoichiometric formulas for Unit 4 Chemistry
« on: September 24, 2012, 10:13:58 pm »
+4

Thermochemistry
(volts, amps and seconds respectively) or

(joule/gram C, grams and joules; change where appropriate)

(joules and amount in moles)

J/C (joules and degrees celsius)

Electrochemistry/electrolysis
(amps and seconds)

(amount of electrons in moles and Faraday's constant)

(Faradays's constant (charge on one mole of electrons and e where e is equal to the charge on a single electron)



I've seen questions that will require you to use an amalgamation of formulas from either section to solve formulas. I've probably left some out/if you think there are any other important ones, post here.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2012, 09:54:35 pm by charmanderp »
University of Melbourne - Bachelor of Arts majoring in English, Economics and International Studies (2013 onwards)

Lasercookie

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Re: Stoichiometric formulas for Unit 4 Chemistry
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2012, 10:20:19 pm »
0
Just to make sure everyone knows what they are. If someone could them that would be fab.
Done.

Thermochemistry
(volts, amps and seconds respectively) or

(joule/gram C, grams and joules; change where appropriate)

(joules and amount in moles)

J/C (joules and degrees celsius)

Electrochemistry/electrolysis
(amps and seconds)

(amount of electrons in moles and Faraday's constant)

(Faradays's constant (charge on one mole of electrons and e where e is equal to the charge on a single electron)



I've seen questions that will require you to use an amalgamation of formulas from either section to solve formulas. I've probably left some out/if you think there are any other important ones, post here.

With , isn't it -- change in temperature? Also you can use the Kelvin scale as the units, since that's has the same 'intervals' as the Celsius scale (i think so anyway).

multiple edits: playing around with the latex.
« Last Edit: September 24, 2012, 10:26:28 pm by laseredd »