FREE lectures this July. Places booking out fast. HSC: book here. VCE: book here.

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

June 21, 2019, 07:43:00 am

Author Topic: A General Guide For Psychology.  (Read 17105 times)  Share 

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Camo

  • Sir President Father Professor Sergeant Admiral Grandmaster Camo OAM
  • Victorian
  • Forum Leader
  • ****
  • Posts: 777
  • I love you like the little taco's.
  • Respect: +61
  • School Grad Year: 2011
A General Guide For Psychology.
« on: November 23, 2011, 02:43:25 pm »
+9
I thought it would be necessary to include a new general guide for those who wish to have a high study score in psychology.

Here is a general guide in succeeding in psychology.

1. Get yourself a copy of the current study design.
http://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/vcaa/vce/studies/psychology/psychologysd2010.pdf
This will serve as your main resource to keep you on track of what you should be studying, and the topics that you will cover.
2. For each dot point of the study design, take it apart, brainstorm. Writing this in another notebook or just typing up these notes will consolidate information (however studies suggest handwriting can be linked to consolidation more than typing notes).
3: Ask Questions! Don't be that one person in class that thinks, 'I've got this, it's easy.' I know psychology can be easy in a clear view, however it is more beneficial to apply your knowledge to everyday life. An example of the unit three and four topics such as memory and learning link to student life, as well as stress during year 12.
4. Think Outside The Box! This can be anything from listening to podcasts, reading relevant information like recent psychological studies, and making your own practice exam.  ::) I had a thread around here somewhere of videos from the big bang theory. two and a half men, etc, related to learning!
5. Always discuss topics with classmates and the teacher. I love to talk about psychology, I find a lot of the information interesting and very engaging. You can be exposed to information from a different perspective.
6. Remember, you have two exams! This gives you a lot more time to study for each one, especially if Psychology is your only mid-year, (thus allowing you to maintain attention towards it).
7. Practice, Practice, Practice! Practice exams are perfect for testing your knowledge. Try to aim for at least one a day at least two weeks before the exam.
8. Use your resources! Books, practice exams, *coughs* moderators.  ;D

P.S. please do not message me asking for practice exams. I unfortunaly don''t have any at the moment.


Most of all, good luck, psychology is a rewarding and useful subject, where information can be applied to everyday life in a variety of beneficial ways.

Below are some other students advice.
« Last Edit: December 14, 2011, 10:46:58 pm by Camo »
‎"We divert our attention from disease and death as much as we can; and the slaughter-houses and indecencies without end on which our life is founded are huddled out of sight and never mentioned, so that the world we recognize officially in literature and in society is a poetic fiction far handsomer and cleaner and better than the world that really is."
- William James.

thebiologybandit

  • Guest
Re: A General Guide For Psychology.
« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2011, 07:42:20 pm »
0
Thanks for the guide! 2012 is going to be a loooong year  :D

Ravit

  • Victorian
  • Forum Obsessive
  • ***
  • Posts: 413
  • Shah Rukh is my son.
  • Respect: +8
  • School: Werribee Secondary College
  • School Grad Year: 2012
Re: A General Guide For Psychology.
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2011, 08:09:53 pm »
0
what podcasts do you recommend listening to?
2012: Psych [44]
2013: Science at UOM
2016: Hopefully MD

REBORN

  • Victorian
  • Part of the furniture
  • *****
  • Posts: 1226
  • Respect: +74
Re: A General Guide For Psychology.
« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2011, 08:10:41 pm »
0
Never used them. My guide will be up on Dec 16.
Doctor of Medicine

Ravit

  • Victorian
  • Forum Obsessive
  • ***
  • Posts: 413
  • Shah Rukh is my son.
  • Respect: +8
  • School: Werribee Secondary College
  • School Grad Year: 2012
Re: A General Guide For Psychology.
« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2011, 08:12:36 pm »
+2
Never used them. My guide will be up on Dec 16.

:D even if you get 49 instead of 50 ;p
2012: Psych [44]
2013: Science at UOM
2016: Hopefully MD

Ravit

  • Victorian
  • Forum Obsessive
  • ***
  • Posts: 413
  • Shah Rukh is my son.
  • Respect: +8
  • School: Werribee Secondary College
  • School Grad Year: 2012
Re: A General Guide For Psychology.
« Reply #5 on: December 15, 2011, 12:33:05 pm »
+1
Awesome advice :D
2012: Psych [44]
2013: Science at UOM
2016: Hopefully MD

playsimme

  • Guest
Re: A General Guide For Psychology.
« Reply #6 on: December 16, 2011, 08:32:45 am »
0
Don't get stuck up on memorising. Do not. It will just blatantly waste your time - psychs turning into a more application based subject. Just UNDERSTAND how terms operate so you can quickly jot ideas down as it relates to the question in the real exam, because frankly, half the time you won't even need to use a perfect definition which you spent countless hours memorising - instead you'll be adapting it for the question. Just my 2 cents because I sure did waste so much time learning definitions instead of understanding the material which would've cracked the same score - as I discovered in the end of year exam.

REBORN

  • Victorian
  • Part of the furniture
  • *****
  • Posts: 1226
  • Respect: +74
ssNake's Experience - tips for Psychology (50)
« Reply #7 on: December 16, 2011, 11:56:25 am »
+15
Hey guys,

I received a study score of 50 for Psychology (2011). Like most other subjects someone writes a guide, so here's mine!

BACKGROUND OF THE SUBJECT

VCE Psychology is regarded as a “fucking pisser” of a subject. Prior to 2010 I’d have to agree with this crude description of the subject. In 2010 a new exam panel was present and students across the state sat the hardest exam in that study design. The cut off usually hovers at ~80/90 but for 2010’rs it dropped to ~76/90. VCAA has changed the format of the questions such that it requires more thinking and less of regurgitation. The current SD (2011-2014) has been undertaken by myself and fellow 2011 Psych’rs and we were treated to the hardest midyear exam ever created – a cut off ~71/90. The message I want to send across is that do not take this subject with an “easy 50” in mind. This attitude will be your downfall.

FORMAT OF ASSESSMENT/WHAT YOU LEARN

The new SD brings a new format – an arguably ‘harder’ format.

Section A remains unchanged at 45 MCQ however questions are no longer sorted by AOS; questions may cross areas and be from more than one dot point on the SD.

Section B may be 30 or 35marks in the form of short answer questions generally ranging from 1-5mark questions. Questions may cross areas and be from more than one dot point on the SD.

Section C – the brand new section - may be 10 or 15 marks. The question can be an essay-type or research-methods based.

FAST FACT – 2011 u3 Section C produced an average of 4.8/15.

Unit 3 is broken into Mind, Brain and Body (AOS1) and Memory (AOS2).
Unit 4 is broken into Learning (AOS1) and Mental Health (AOS2)

In the previous SD Memory was tested in Unit 4 so make sure you do those practice questions as they are relevant!

HARD CONCEPTS

At the request of Ravit I shall list what I personally found ‘hard’. These may mean nothing to you now but they will make sense when you get to it.
Sleep-wake cycle shift, RAS, Reticular formation, Thalamus, Sperry’s work, Loftus, Change Blindess/Inattentional Blindness

The whole of LEARNING is a conceptual part of Psychology. There’s very little regurgitation in this AOS. You must understand the principles of each type of learning. For this reason it is either very hard or very easy because once you understand, everything comes to you instantly.

Mental Health is straightforward and my favourite AOS.

RESOURCES I USED
Grivas – best text, does contain a few errors though. Most notably, elderly people receive 20% REM sleep and not 33% as Grivas states.
Oxford – supplementary text. I used this only to clarify what Grivas said. Overall Grivas is better.
A+ Summary notes – Irrelevant information in it as well as relevant. You’d be better off buying a student’s notes IMO.
A+ Exams – too easy. Fundamental principles are tested though.
NEAP Guide – comes with 3 exams. Worth it. There are also AOS specific questions for SAC prep.
Checkpoints – didn’t buy it for u3 (don’t really see the point? All VCAA exams are available for free). I did buy it for u4 as Mental Health is a completely brand new AOS so I needed the extra questions.

MY RECOMMENDATION FOR A STUDY PLAN

Do not complete the whole of u3 before school starts.

I completed AOS1 only. Read through AOS2 though.

During school work consistently ahead of class. Ask questions. Gain an appreciation for the subject. Relate everything back to everyday life. Talk about Psychology. Ingrain it. It should become a part of your existence.

I recommend 20 exams per unit for the conscientious student aiming 45+

For u4 I finished the whole course in terms of note-making in the short term2 2 week holidays. Yes I no life’d this...it took me, on average, 4 hours a day. The reason I did this was to practise AOS1 – Learning – a much more conceptual area of study that required being exposed to examples. I must say it paid its dividends as I demolished the two LEARNING SACs.

Overall consistent work is the key to success. Always review what you already know – over learning ensures you won’t forget a definition on the day!

SLUMDAWG

This is the username of a 2010 Psychology 50’r. He mentored me throughout the year and was always there to address my concerns. However the best resource he can offer is his Unit 3 (self-created) exam. I endorse this as the best Unit 3 exam out there. It is very much an exam for those aiming extremely high (47+) as it is quite difficult. I got 78/91 and was Rank 1. Buy this exam. It is invaluable.
Unfortunately he did not make one for Unit 4. Have no fear – I shall be creating my own Unit 4 exam. Keep tuned for that!

TOTALED

This is the username of a 2010 Psychology 50’r. Pretty much the same role as Slumdawg but without the exam…but came with free notes! FAST FACT: After I complete Year 12, totaled and I may start up a company with Psychology lectures. Stay tuned.

THANKS TO BOTH SLUMDAWG AND TOTALED. Love you <3

SUMMARY

Psychology is a subject in which hard work will put off. It is inevitable that you will need to memorise definitions and there is a lot of content to work through so make sure you’re consistent in your work. It’s okay to be a perfectionist in your study but beyond all, LOVE IT. I shall miss it in Year 12.

GOOD LUCK!
« Last Edit: December 21, 2011, 09:03:18 pm by ssNake »
Doctor of Medicine

REBORN

  • Victorian
  • Part of the furniture
  • *****
  • Posts: 1226
  • Respect: +74
Re: A General Guide For Psychology.
« Reply #8 on: December 16, 2011, 03:13:54 pm »
+4
Hmm I forgot to mention lectures.

I'd recommend Connect Ed. The advantage of having a student lecturer is that he/she knows exactly what he/she's talking about because they've been through it before and done very well (got a 50). The lecture was very engaging as well, containing helpful tricks.

If not that, then Pathways although I dislike one of the presenters (not going to name names!)

Sign up to Connect's mailing list - may get discounts.
http://connecteducation.us2.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=32875de93ea23de4e99ccbbf2&id=d091cbf552
Doctor of Medicine

Ravit

  • Victorian
  • Forum Obsessive
  • ***
  • Posts: 413
  • Shah Rukh is my son.
  • Respect: +8
  • School: Werribee Secondary College
  • School Grad Year: 2012
Re: A General Guide For Psychology.
« Reply #9 on: December 16, 2011, 04:37:29 pm »
0
ssnake you mentioned everything i wanted to know!!!! legend! congrats for your 50!!!!
2012: Psych [44]
2013: Science at UOM
2016: Hopefully MD

amilss

  • Victorian
  • Trendsetter
  • **
  • Posts: 115
  • Respect: +7
  • School: St Peters College
  • School Grad Year: 2012
Re: A General Guide For Psychology.
« Reply #10 on: December 16, 2011, 05:52:45 pm »
+1
i cannot reiterate enough how important practice exams are!!!
i have a very good memory for text, so i can pretty much recite paragraphs from a book without much effort, but this precision won't get you over the line in psych! you have to have a conceptual understanding of the theory, and not forgetting to "communicate with psychological language"

the concepts aren't hard in psych, in my opinion, the most difficult bit is understanding exactly what the question wants from you. as you do more practice exams, your ability to decode the question increases majorly, and your confidence too.
i scored much lower on the exams than i should have because i simply avoided the question in my answers LOL

also everyone should have the grivas textbook. it has high quality learning activites (most of them) which i always wrote exam style answers. this helped to engrave the theory into my brain. most of these were purely set as homework by my teacher, but coursework can still be a very good revision tool for exams
2011 - Psychology [42]
2012 atar aim - 99+. There,i said it, it's offical, now i have to reach it!

betruetoyou22

  • Victorian
  • Forum Regular
  • **
  • Posts: 86
  • "Simplicity is the Ultimate Sophistication"
  • Respect: +1
  • School Grad Year: 2012
Re: A General Guide For Psychology.
« Reply #11 on: December 16, 2011, 10:38:43 pm »
0
What is a "students note IMO" ?
AVAILABLE FOR TUTORING: F.M - psych - English
FIRST LESSON IS FREE.
0414 018 996 (m)

cbf

  • Victorian
  • Trailblazer
  • *
  • Posts: 29
  • Respect: 0
Re: A General Guide For Psychology.
« Reply #12 on: December 19, 2011, 01:48:12 am »
+1
Didn't get a 50 or anything but I got above 45+ and looking back I would've changed a few things.
First of all I would highly recommend to do some regular revision of what you have learned at school; whether it be simply be re-reading or more effectively make up your own questions about a particular question and answer it. Use your notes from class, textbook, lecture notes to help you complete this, but I also found watching videos, even googling stuff, very effective in learning the overall background of complex topics.
Try to relate the content to your own experiences. Examples of a particular phenomenon WILL come in handy during the exam and this way it is easier to remember.
During the term break or throughout the year, create your own notes by following the Study Design Dot Points which can be done in a variety of ways whether it be typing it up on Word or a bunch of brainstorming maps.
You want to study for your SACS at least one week prior, I always left it to the morning or day before and for the mid year a month gives plenty of time. Try to have your notes all done etc so you can spend the time simply doing practice exams, questions and touching up on difficult topics.

I hope you all enjoy the course as much as I did, and with enough effort I reckon ANYONE could get 40+ and even 45+. I probably did 4-5 hours study for each SAC and about 12 practice exams and checkpoints, but the more you do the better!

REBORN

  • Victorian
  • Part of the furniture
  • *****
  • Posts: 1226
  • Respect: +74
Re: A General Guide For Psychology.
« Reply #13 on: December 21, 2011, 09:04:46 pm »
0
What is a "students note IMO" ?
IMO = in my opinion

Student's notes = a student, preferably who scored 48+, who made their own Psychology notes.
Doctor of Medicine

icecream

  • Victorian
  • Trailblazer
  • *
  • Posts: 47
  • Respect: 0
Re: A General Guide For Psychology.
« Reply #14 on: January 15, 2012, 11:47:10 am »
0
im doing psych this year and im having trouble finishing the learning activities quickly. like it takes me around 1.5 hours to do one LA. does anyone have any tips on how to finish the LAs quickly but accurately?
thankyouu  :D