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September 15, 2019, 05:29:06 pm

Author Topic: The scope of liability?  (Read 653 times)  Share 

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hdxx

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The scope of liability?
« on: September 23, 2018, 01:10:09 pm »
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Can someone please explain the scope of liability and why it should be considered when initiating a civil claim?

SemiAdapted

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Re: The scope of liability?
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2018, 05:21:33 pm »
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Basically, how long after a civil wrong has been committed that action can be taken. For example, the scope of liability for defamation is one year, meaning that after that action cannot be taken unless the courts specifically say so for that particular case.

DoctorTwo

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Re: The scope of liability?
« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2018, 12:03:02 pm »
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Basically, how long after a civil wrong has been committed that action can be taken. For example, the scope of liability for defamation is one year, meaning that after that action cannot be taken unless the courts specifically say so for that particular case.
I think you may be confusing the scope of liability with limitation of actions. The scope of liability refers to who can be liable for a civil wrong, and can include many people or businesses. For example, if a Supermarket worker cleans the floor then doesn't put down a wet floor sign, and a customer slips and suffers an injury as a result, the worker will be liable for breaching their duty of care to customers. The employer can also be liable if they hadn't provided adequate training to that employee that would have allowed them to know to put the sign down. The scope of liability should be considered when initiating a civil claim because the plaintiff may be able to sue more people or organisations than just those directly involved in the wrong, to ensure that they are returned to their original position as soon and as best as possible.

Limitation of actions refers to the length of time that can pass after the commission of the wrong or tort before a civil action will no longer be valid. For example, if somebody has breached a contract that you had with them, you have 6 years to file a civil claim from the date that the contract was breached. This is to promote social cohesion and ensure that animosities are settled in a timely manner.