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June 17, 2019, 08:35:01 pm

Author Topic: Social Learning Theory aka Observational Learning  (Read 305 times)  Share 

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lleeea

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Social Learning Theory aka Observational Learning
« on: September 07, 2018, 10:38:59 pm »
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hey peeps,
Can someone pls explain the social learning theory in the simplest way possible. and include a list of things i should specifically know for the social learning theory (dont include uneccessary info pls, its needs to be relevant to current study design). your help will be much appreciated.
 ;D ;D ;D



mod edit: changed the title from all-caps, in future please refrain from using all caps for thread titles
« Last Edit: September 07, 2018, 11:37:11 pm by miniturtle »

sdfg

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Re: SOCIAL LEARNING THEORY AKA OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2018, 11:34:41 pm »
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Examples of observational learning would be when kids copy what adults do; the adult does an action, the child watches them do the action (including the consequences of the action), and then imitates the action if the consequences aren't deemed to be negative. That's pretty much observational learning in a nutshell - learning through watching (i.e. observing) an action being modelled by someone else and the consequences of the actions, then imitating the action afterwards.

What you need to know for the exams is what affects the process of observational learning, in particular in the context of children. These factors include:
- Attention: How concentrated is the learner on the model and their behaviour? This could be influenced by external factors (e.g distractions), internal factors (e.g learner's amount of sleep the night before), or the model themself (e.g if the model is someone the learner respects, they're likely to pay more attention). If the learner doesn't pay attention, they could miss the consequence of the behaviour or the behaviour itself, and then learning doesn't occur.
- Retention: Ability to retain an accurate mental representation of (i.e. how to do) the behaviour. The nature of the behaviour itself affects this (e.g you're more likely to retain a behaviour if it's meaningful - learning how to bat for the first time, for instance). No retention = no learning.
- Reproduction: Ability to reproduce the behaviour. The capabilities of the model influences this (e.g kids won't be able to reproduce the action of deadlifting 200lb). Can't perform the behaviour = won't be able to learn the behaviour regardless of how well you know how to do it.
- Motivation: Concerns how much the learner wants to learn the behaviour. Reinforcement (or punishment) affects this. If they don't want to learn it, they won't learn it (for why? see below)

The study design also emphasises observational learning as a "method of social learning". This basically means that there's an interaction between the learner and model and that they're both actively participating in the learning process - 'socialising' with each other, in a sense.

Hope that helps. :)
« Last Edit: September 08, 2018, 09:28:09 am by sdfg »
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lleeea

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Re: SOCIAL LEARNING THEORY AKA OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2018, 08:53:28 pm »
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Examples of observational learning would be when kids copy what adults do; the adult does an action, the child watches them do the action (including the consequences of the action), and then imitates the action if the consequences aren't deemed to be negative. That's pretty much observational learning in a nutshell - learning through watching (i.e. observing) an action being modelled by someone else and the consequences of the actions, then imitating the action afterwards.

What you need to know for the exams is what affects the process of observational learning, in particular in the context of children. These factors include:
- Attention: How concentrated is the learner on the model and their behaviour? This could be influenced by external factors (e.g distractions), internal factors (e.g learner's amount of sleep the night before), or the model themself (e.g if the model is someone the learner respects, they're likely to pay more attention). If the learner doesn't pay attention, they could miss the consequence of the behaviour or the behaviour itself, and then learning doesn't occur.
- Retention: Ability to retain an accurate mental representation of (i.e. how to do) the behaviour. The nature of the behaviour itself affects this (e.g you're more likely to retain a behaviour if it's meaningful - learning how to bat for the first time, for instance). No retention = no learning.
- Reproduction: Ability to reproduce the behaviour. The capabilities of the model influences this (e.g kids won't be able to reproduce the action of deadlifting 200lb). Can't perform the behaviour = won't be able to learn the behaviour regardless of how well you know how to do it.
- Motivation: Concerns how much the learner wants to learn the behaviour. Reinforcement (or punishment) affects this. If they don't want to learn it, they won't learn it (for why? see below)

The study design also emphasises observational learning as a "method of social learning". This basically means that there's an interaction between the learner and model and that they're both actively participating in the learning process - 'socialising' with each other, in a sense.

Hope that helps. :)
Thx for your help. Much appreciated :)