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May 23, 2019, 10:43:07 am

Author Topic: English Advanced Question Thread  (Read 479239 times)

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david.wang28

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Re: English Advanced Question Thread
« Reply #4365 on: April 20, 2019, 04:17:24 pm »
+2
Hi everyone!
For holiday homework, I have been set a practice discursive essay based off Margaret Atwood's speech, 'Spotty-Handed Villianesses'.

I have been having a lot of problems with writing a discursive essay, I have read over the syllabus and I know that discursive essays explore different perspectives and opinions on an idea, however I am unsure on many other aspects of this text type. So, I thought I would come on here to ask a few questions.

How do you structure a discursive essay? I feel like when I am writing it there is absolutely no structure, which makes me confused on what to write.
When asked to refer to a text, how do you incorporate it into the essay?
Is there anywhere I can go to see some example discursive essays?

Honestly, I am just very confused on how to write this, any advice would be much appreciated.

Thanks in advance!
Anita
Hey there! I didn't do the new syllabus, so don't expect too much from me for English (I'm more of a maths & science person). From what I know, discursive essays tend to stray from the main point, but at the same time you have to be fluent and expansive when you write a discursive essay. When you refer to a text, just go 'Text' (year of publication) explores ... and so on. You can go on Google and search for discursive essays, that's all from me.
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r1ckworthy

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Re: English Advanced Question Thread
« Reply #4366 on: April 22, 2019, 11:39:40 am »
0
Hey everyone,

I am struggling a lot in terms of analysing my texts, which are Richard III and Looking For Richard. I have made a table with the rubric on one side and am struggling to come up with quotes and analysis.

How does everyone come to know their texts inside and out in a short amount of time? Unlike other schools, my half-yearlies are in three weeks and I am really struggling in engaging with my texts, if that makes sense.

Thanks!
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jamonwindeyer

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Re: English Advanced Question Thread
« Reply #4367 on: April 22, 2019, 11:46:17 am »
+3
Hey everyone,

I am struggling a lot in terms of analysing my texts, which are Richard III and Looking For Richard. I have made a table with the rubric on one side and am struggling to come up with quotes and analysis.

How does everyone come to know their texts inside and out in a short amount of time? Unlike other schools, my half-yearlies are in three weeks and I am really struggling in engaging with my texts, if that makes sense.

Thanks!

Hey! Have you checked out the free notes section? There are tonnes of notes on LFR/KRII that might help you get started with where to focus in the texts ;D

angewina_naguen

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Re: English Advanced Question Thread
« Reply #4368 on: April 22, 2019, 01:33:07 pm »
+3
Hey everyone,

I am struggling a lot in terms of analysing my texts, which are Richard III and Looking For Richard. I have made a table with the rubric on one side and am struggling to come up with quotes and analysis.

How does everyone come to know their texts inside and out in a short amount of time? Unlike other schools, my half-yearlies are in three weeks and I am really struggling in engaging with my texts, if that makes sense.

Thanks!

Hey, r1ckworthy!

As Jamon's suggested, looking at existing notes can help you figure out the best way to organise your own! I also recommend starting off by identifying quotes that are similar across both texts since it's a comparative study. This will help you pair them up in analysis and engage in the "textual conversation" they are having  ;D Once you've paired them up, you can then outline what meanings have remained relevant over time and also where meanings may have been adjusted, altered or challenged in retrospection  :)

Angelina  ;D
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angewina_naguen

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Re: English Advanced Question Thread
« Reply #4369 on: April 22, 2019, 01:36:28 pm »
+3
Hi everyone!
For holiday homework, I have been set a practice discursive essay based off Margaret Atwood's speech, 'Spotty-Handed Villianesses'.

I have been having a lot of problems with writing a discursive essay, I have read over the syllabus and I know that discursive essays explore different perspectives and opinions on an idea, however I am unsure on many other aspects of this text type. So, I thought I would come on here to ask a few questions.

How do you structure a discursive essay? I feel like when I am writing it there is absolutely no structure, which makes me confused on what to write.
When asked to refer to a text, how do you incorporate it into the essay?
Is there anywhere I can go to see some example discursive essays?

Honestly, I am just very confused on how to write this, any advice would be much appreciated.

Thanks in advance!
Anita

Hey, Anita!

Discursive writing is a new form being introduced into the syllabus for Mod C. I'm clarifying this because not many students, and teachers even, will know how they work and what discursive writing entails. I'll do my best to give some advice but do take it with a grain of salt as I myself am still familiarising myself around it.

As David's said, discursive writing requires a discussion of ideas from various angles which are expanded and integrated into one overall observation/judgement you wish to put forth. As opposed to an essay which is more strictly written. discursive writing welcomes personal voice and flair, enabling you to articulate your ideas in a freer context.

When it comes to structuring a discursive essay, there doesn't seem to be a consensus on what is correct. Your structure should essentially be designed around the way you wish to logically present your ideas  8) What you need to do is separate your points into distinct groups and then figure out what order you would like to place them in order for there to be a sustained flow and coherence. If you read George Orwell's essays for example, which are quite discursive in nature, they are all structured differently to suit the perspective he is communicating. I would suggest reading some essays from writers such as Virginia Woolf, Sylvia Plath and Edgar Allan Poe too if you would like to see how different essays can be structured  :)

When referring to a text, I agree with David in that you would introduce it as you would normally in an essay with the Author's Text Type 'Title' (Year of Publication) template. In discursive writing, there isn't as huge of a focus on analysis of techniques; the essay should discuss the concepts and ideas surrounding the text and how it relates to the rest of your subject matter  :) Continue to refer back to the marking criteria to see what your markers are looking for and if you still are unsure, email your teacher and ask for more clarification! Hope this helps and let me know if you have any more questions  ;D

Angelina  ;D
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therese07

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Re: English Advanced Question Thread
« Reply #4370 on: April 22, 2019, 09:59:48 pm »
0
Hey!

I just wanted to ask for any english essay, how can you effectively incorporate an academic scholar's or 'readings' from a scholar in an essay? How can we do that and still maintain relevance to what the question is asking?

Thank you so much!
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angewina_naguen

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Re: English Advanced Question Thread
« Reply #4371 on: April 22, 2019, 10:32:49 pm »
+1
Hey!

I just wanted to ask for any english essay, how can you effectively incorporate an academic scholar's or 'readings' from a scholar in an essay? How can we do that and still maintain relevance to what the question is asking?

Thank you so much!

Hey, therese07!

Academic readings and scholars are great to include, especially for Module B, in your essays.To ensure that they are still relevant to the question, choose quotes that can be inserted in a fashion that doesn't disrupt or narrow the analysis. Basically, these quotes should ideally be conceptual and easy to adapt.
The quotes should reflect your personal appreciation of the text first and foremost; then, you can adjust them to suit the question. The readings that spark something in you, whether it resonates perfectly with how you feel about the text or you completely disagree with. Allow them to enhance and guide the aspects of your judgement and thesis, as opposed to determining it. Your original thoughts and perspectives are the most valuable and these critical readings should assist you in filling any gaps in your understanding of the text.

In the below spoiler, I have a sample paragraph from my Module B essay on Cloudstreet which you can have a look at  ;D The scholar quote is in bold and you can see how I have in-text referenced the source as well.

Cloudstreet Module B
Finally, Winton’s attraction to water bodies was catalysed from personal experience and fabricated to endorse a reaction of closure from reconciliation. The author’s background as a surfer is evident in the imagery of water, notably the river, in ‘Cloudstreet’, extending to appeal to Australian audiences. The river’s situation at the beginning and the end of the novel fringes the process of Fish’s reconciliation of self, mirroring Winton’s contemporaries’ expectations to experience reconciliation during the Bicentennial. Winton’s admiration of “the beautiful, the beautiful river” repetitiously articulates his appreciation for the natural aesthetic of the water and how Fish would “savour that healing all the rest of the journey.” This innate, symbolic connection Fish has to the water after his separation of metaphysical self is evident in his dialogue “River! said Fish.” Absent of quotation marks, Winton foreshadows this unity that Fish aspires to achieve and sustains this with a second person address to Fish from his self that “not all of...had come back” in “your turn is coming.” By addressing the audience with the pronoun “your”, expectations of the final reconciliation are cultivated and endorsed by the author as a means to create empowerment. This ethereal experience is captured in the final sentences “Perfectly. Always. Everyplace. Me.” Reuniting with his identity, Fish becomes connected and whole which although ends in tragedy and may defy expectations, allows audiences to heal. Winton’s appeal is garnered from this unification as Fish endorses the timeless desire in the human condition to transcend physicality and reach eternal peace, as achieved from engaging in what Winton explores as a divine reunion after twenty years of passing. Whether audiences anticipate this cyclical narrative, Winton resolves the novel with this construction of river imagery and the emotional impact enables “the eye and imagination of the realist, alive to the mass and colour and sound of the sea and river” (Lyn McCredden, 2013), seamlessly unifying the novel and its coherent tale of reconciliation.

Hope this helps! Good luck with the essay  ;D

Angelina  ;D
« Last Edit: April 22, 2019, 10:34:39 pm by angewina_naguen »
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sarrahbarodawala

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Re: English Advanced Question Thread
« Reply #4372 on: April 23, 2019, 03:34:53 pm »
0
Hello :)
For a Mod A essay, what would be an effective essay structure, which would incorporate all the key ideas, and both texts? Like are 2 body paragraphs enough to write all the information?
Thank you!

owidjaja

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Re: English Advanced Question Thread
« Reply #4373 on: April 23, 2019, 05:58:42 pm »
+1
Hello :)
For a Mod A essay, what would be an effective essay structure, which would incorporate all the key ideas, and both texts? Like are 2 body paragraphs enough to write all the information?
Thank you!
Hey there,

I would personally recommend 3 body paragraphs where I'll integrate my analysis for both texts. Not only do I get to analyse more ideas, it also makes the comparison a lot easier. For example, I did 1984/Metropolis and there were times where I would emphasise on the similarities/differences by referring to the other text. That being said, if you have been doing 2 body paragraphs, then you should be exploring your ideas into greater depth. Either way, the markers shouldn't be too picky with how many paragraphs you choose to do as long as you're analysing your texts and answering the rubric points.

Hope this helps!
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maddi.mccarthy

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Re: English Advanced Question Thread
« Reply #4374 on: April 25, 2019, 01:27:18 pm »
0
Hey,
I'm just wondering if there's any resources to access practice short answer and essay questions other than the sample paper NESA published? I tried past papers but they're so different there wasn't much point, can anyone provide any resources?
Thanks guys :)

violet123

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Re: English Advanced Question Thread
« Reply #4375 on: April 25, 2019, 04:04:28 pm »
0
Can I use the first person in a discursive essay?

angewina_naguen

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Re: English Advanced Question Thread
« Reply #4376 on: April 25, 2019, 07:07:06 pm »
+2
Hey,
I'm just wondering if there's any resources to access practice short answer and essay questions other than the sample paper NESA published? I tried past papers but they're so different there wasn't much point, can anyone provide any resources?
Thanks guys :)

Hey, maddi.mccarthy!

I have yet to find resources for the new syllabus but I actually find generating your own essay questions an effective study tactic! All the HSC questions for Advanced are drawn from the rubrics for each module. You can easily construct original questions and practise with them yourself. The types of questions you could get in the exam include "how" questions, "to what extent" questions, statements/quotes relating to, or directly from, the prescribed text/s, or a combination of these features. For example, based off the "human qualities and emotions" aspect of the common module, you could derive these kind of questions;

- How have the flaws in human qualities and emotions been represented in your prescribed text?
- “The best books... are those that tell you what you know already.” (George Orwell, 1984) To what extent does this statement resonate with human qualities and emotions from your understanding of Texts and Human Experiences?
- Humanity's success and downfall is determined from whether or not there is empathy. Do you agree or disagree?

This will also help test how versed you are in the module's ideas and concepts as a result  :) If I do come across some resources, I'll be happy to make a separate thread for them! Hope this helps  ;D

Angelina  ;D
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angewina_naguen

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Re: English Advanced Question Thread
« Reply #4377 on: April 25, 2019, 07:12:29 pm »
+2
Can I use the first person in a discursive essay?

Hey, violet123!

Using first person is totally acceptable  ;D If you feel uncertain about it, you can justify it in the critical reflection as a conscious decision of yours to engage your reader with a more personal voice in the essay  8) Definitely allowed though! Good luck with it  :D

Angelina  ;D
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KC181

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Re: English Advanced Question Thread
« Reply #4378 on: April 26, 2019, 02:27:26 pm »
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Hi There! This may seem like a silly question, but how exactly can I actually incorporate a motif into my creative effectively? I know and understand what it is but when adding it into a creative I always feel like I make it seem too forced, or sometimes I don't use it enough that it doesn't seem like a motif at all.
Thank you!

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Re: English Advanced Question Thread
« Reply #4379 on: April 26, 2019, 04:11:10 pm »
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Hi There! This may seem like a silly question, but how exactly can I actually incorporate a motif into my creative effectively? I know and understand what it is but when adding it into a creative I always feel like I make it seem too forced, or sometimes I don't use it enough that it doesn't seem like a motif at all.
Thank you!

Even if it is subtle, in your creative if you expand on it in your rationale it may help.

Hope I helped.