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July 24, 2019, 06:50:25 am

Author Topic: VCE Specialist 3/4 Question Thread!  (Read 1065844 times)  Share 

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undefined

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Re: VCE Specialist 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #9450 on: April 21, 2019, 06:25:36 pm »
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Hi I can't figure out how to do part b from both questions linked. For question 1 I can't figure out how to use recognition to rearrange the equation (which I'm pretty sure is the method they want you to use) and I only got so far as rearranging for the integral of xcos^n(x) from the original equation. Question 2 they most likely expect you to use recognition too. I tried to change all the x's in part a) ii into (pi/2 - x) and then isolate the xcos(x) integral, but got (pi-x)sin(x)-cos(x) as a final answer which is wrong too (I know using integration by parts would make things 20 times less complicated but I need those working marks if I get the wrong answer). As always help is appreciated.
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schoolstudent115

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Re: VCE Specialist 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #9451 on: April 21, 2019, 07:19:28 pm »
+1
Hi I can't figure out how to do part b from both questions linked. For question 1 I can't figure out how to use recognition to rearrange the equation (which I'm pretty sure is the method they want you to use) and I only got so far as rearranging for the integral of xcos^n(x) from the original equation. Question 2 they most likely expect you to use recognition too. I tried to change all the x's in part a) ii into (pi/2 - x) and then isolate the xcos(x) integral, but got (pi-x)sin(x)-cos(x) as a final answer which is wrong too (I know using integration by parts would make things 20 times less complicated but I need those working marks if I get the wrong answer). As always help is appreciated.
Question 1: From what you said, you did part (a),  you should have gotten: (using the chain rule and product rule).

So . Rearranging for cos^n(x)


Integrating both sides (and flipping the equation):

Let

Notice that the integrand on the RHS of the equation from before is just
So

So substituting the previous result back in:

Adding to both sides

The left hand side is just , So divide through by to get the final value of the integral:


As for the second question you had, you may have to use a similar technique. If you need further help feel free to reply.

« Last Edit: April 22, 2019, 11:26:50 am by schoolstudent115 »
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undefined

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Re: VCE Specialist 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #9452 on: April 22, 2019, 09:04:03 pm »
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Flight112

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Re: VCE Specialist 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #9453 on: April 23, 2019, 04:32:36 pm »
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Hi I have a question about linear substitution in relation this question:

∫x^2 √(x-1)

AlphaZero

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Re: VCE Specialist 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #9454 on: April 23, 2019, 05:12:37 pm »
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Hi I have a question about linear substitution in relation this question:

∫x^2 √(x-1)

The substitution  \(u=x-1\)  should give you progress :)

Spoiler
Using  \(u=x-1\),  we have  \(x^2=(u+1)^2\)  and  \(\dfrac{du}{dx}=1\),  so
\[\int x^2\sqrt{x-1}\,\text{d}x=\int (u+1)^2\sqrt{u}\,\text{d}u=\int\left(u^{5/2}+2u^{3/2}+u^{1/2}\right)\text{d}u,\] which can be integrated quite easily.
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Flight112

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Re: VCE Specialist 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #9455 on: April 23, 2019, 05:24:09 pm »
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Thankyou, I did use this approach originally, however after integrating I attained solution of:

 2/7(x-1)^(7/2)+2/5(x-1)^(5/2)+3/2(x-1)^(3/2)+c

When the actual solution is:


AlphaZero

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Re: VCE Specialist 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #9456 on: April 23, 2019, 05:37:15 pm »
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Thankyou, I did use this approach originally, however after integrating I attained solution of:

2/7(x-1)^(7/2)+2/5(x-1)^(5/2)+3/2(x-1)^(3/2)+c

When the actual solution is:

The solution provided just does some really unnecessary factoring by taking out a  \(2/105\)  and  \((x-1)^{3/2}\)  from every term.

Also, just be a little careful when applying the power rule. Correct answer in expanded form is: \[\int x^2\sqrt{x-1}\,\text{d}x=\frac{2}{7}(x-1)^{7/2}+\frac{4}{5}(x-1)^{5/2}+\frac{2}{3}(x-1)^{3/2}+c,\quad c\in\mathbb{R}\]
2015\(-\)2017:  VCE
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Flight112

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Re: VCE Specialist 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #9457 on: April 23, 2019, 05:56:18 pm »
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Right, I appreciate the assistance. I'll make sure to look out for those errors. Though I'm curious, is it necessary to state that c is part of R (soz can't remember the name for the symbol) with the final solution?

And thank you for the help overall, my first experience using the forums was a positive one. 

AlphaZero

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Re: VCE Specialist 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #9458 on: April 23, 2019, 06:02:11 pm »
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Right, I appreciate the assistance. I'll make sure to look out for those errors. Though I'm curious, is it necessary to state that c is part of R (soz can't remember the name for the symbol) with the final solution?

And thank you for the help overall, my first experience using the forums was a positive one.

No, you don't need to specify that \(c\) is a real constant. It's pretty clear in the context of integration what \(c\) is. However, in a situation where you have to deal with many variables, it might be nice to be precise and label what everything is for the sake of clarity. The only reason I specified it is because I've gotten into the good habit of doing so.

Glad I could help ;)
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Flight112

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Re: VCE Specialist 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #9459 on: April 25, 2019, 10:52:33 am »
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Hi again, another question in relation to inverse circular functions:

How would the the implied domain and range be affected by squaring x :

y=cos^(-1) (x^2)

I can understand that the domain of [-1,1] will not be affected, however what would be the calculations for deriving the range?

Thankyou in advance

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Re: VCE Specialist 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #9460 on: April 25, 2019, 11:21:14 am »
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Hi again, another question in relation to inverse circular functions:

How would the the implied domain and range be affected by squaring x :

y=cos^(-1) (x^2)

I can understand that the domain of [-1,1] will not be affected, however what would be the calculations for deriving the range?

Thankyou in advance 
At this point, now we note that the range of \(h(x)=x^2\) when restricted to domain \([-1,1]\) is \([0,1]\).

The range you're after will now coincide with the range of \(g(x)=\cos^{-1}x\), but with domain of \(g\) restricted to \([0,1]\). (i.e. Restrict the domain of \(g\) to the range of \(h\).) A sketch is then enough to help us deduce that the range will be \( \left[0, \frac\pi2\right]\).
« Last Edit: April 25, 2019, 11:22:45 am by RuiAce »

persistent_insomniac

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Re: VCE Specialist 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #9461 on: April 25, 2019, 11:34:38 am »
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How do you integrate 1/9+4x^2 ? I get it is tan^-1(2x/3) + c but how do you get the 1/6 at the front?

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Re: VCE Specialist 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #9462 on: April 25, 2019, 11:45:26 am »
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How do you integrate 1/9+4x^2 ? I get it is tan^-1(2x/3) + c but how do you get the 1/6 at the front?

Recall that:



Hence:



Since in this case a = 3/2 and we have a factor of 1/6 out the front of the integral.

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Re: VCE Specialist 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #9463 on: April 25, 2019, 12:37:29 pm »
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At this point, now we note that the range of \(h(x)=x^2\) when restricted to domain \([-1,1]\) is \([0,1]\).

The range you're after will now coincide with the range of \(g(x)=\cos^{-1}x\), but with domain of \(g\) restricted to \([0,1]\). (i.e. Restrict the domain of \(g\) to the range of \(h\).) A sketch is then enough to help us deduce that the range will be \( \left[0, \frac\pi2\right]\).

Ok, but how is putting the domain with the restrictions [-1,1] into the h(x)=x^2 equate to the restriction [0,1]?

RuiAce

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Re: VCE Specialist 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #9464 on: April 25, 2019, 12:43:02 pm »
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Ok, but how is putting the domain with the restrictions [-1,1] into the h(x)=x^2 equate to the restriction [0,1]?
If you sketch \(y=x^2\) with domain restriction \([-1,1]\), don't the values for \(y\) become restricted to being between 0 and 1?