ATAR Notes: Forum

Uni Stuff => General University Discussion and Queries => Topic started by: Jigsaw on June 17, 2017, 12:05:13 am

Title: Difference between Melbourne JD and Monash Undergrad Law?
Post by: Jigsaw on June 17, 2017, 12:05:13 am
Hi guys,

I was wondering what the main differences between the two courses are (apart from grad v undergrad), and if anyone seems to know why Melbourne has phased out its undergraduate law courses?

Cheers
Title: Re: Difference between Melbourne JD and Monash Undergrad Law?
Post by: brenden on June 17, 2017, 12:13:14 am
Doing an undergrad then the JD will cost a load more money haha, I don't know much more than that!
Title: Re: Difference between Melbourne JD and Monash Undergrad Law?
Post by: patriciarose on June 17, 2017, 01:45:27 pm
Hi guys,

I was wondering what the main differences between the two courses are (apart from grad v undergrad), and if anyone seems to know why Melbourne has phased out its undergraduate law courses?

Cheers

not a law student (just been doing research for a while because ugh vtac applications) so take this with a grain of salt but: pretty sure jd condenses the course quite a bit (you still learn what you need to obviously, but in three years instead). you need an lsat score to get into the jd too, plus your undergrad wam, whereas obviously for the llb it's atar score. also, if you want to practice overseas apparently the jd carries more weight than the llb (because grad degree vs undergraduate? idk.) and there are less csp places for the melbourne jd so bear that in mind because the fees are over $100k. tbh i don't see why you'd wait to do the jd if you get the atar for the llb unless you weren't sure about going straight into it/wanted to do it at melbourne (: but if anyone's doing that i'd also love to hear why? (:
Title: Re: Difference between Melbourne JD and Monash Undergrad Law?
Post by: Glasses on June 17, 2017, 02:34:00 pm
Admittedly my opinion will be quite biased, but some of the reasons I chose Monash Law over Melbourne are:

- Employability-wise, whether you went to Monash or Melbourne will have virtually no difference; both are viewed quite favourably by employers, both have great reputations and both have notable alumni (off the top of my head: Bill Shorten, Marilyn Warren [current Chief Justice of the Supreme Court], Julian Burnside and Peter Costello all completed Monash Law courses).

- The Monash Law Pathway allows you to complete two degrees at the same time (thus mixing things up and meaning you don't have to complete 4 law units per semester [which is very difficult and can be detrimental to marks]). In contrast, the Melbourne Law Pathway requires that students complete one degree, followed by another (with the latter being structured so that students complete four law units per semester, in order to complete the JD in 3 years).

- In addition to regular international exchange and study trip options, Monash Law students are given the opportunity to study at Monash's international campuses in Prato (Italy) and Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia).

- The Monash LLB incorporates a research component, including the opportunity to complete an honours thesis (without adding any extra time to your degree). Accordingly, students are given the opportunity to thoroughly research an area of law that interests them. To my knowledge, the Melbourne JD does not incorporate a similar research component.

- Students aren't guaranteed entry into the Melbourne JD (unless they receive a 99.90/99.95). Entry into the Melbourne JD is very competitive, and requires a good average, LSAT score and cover letter. Therefore, you risk studying for a few years, and obtaining a HECS-debt without actually gaining admission to study what you want to. In contrast, the Monash program allows you to start studying law from the get go.

- Since the Monash Pathway allows students to study law right away, they can start volunteering at Community Legal Centres and getting legal experience sooner; and given how competitive the legal job market is, those extra years of experience can be very important.

- Carrying on from the above, the Monash Law Faculty currently runs two Community Legal Centres (the Oakleigh Monash Legal Service and the Springvale Monash Legal Service) - both of which students can get involved in; either through volunteering or taking Professional Practice electives. I'll also note that the Monash Law Faculty have announced that from 2018, all students who wish to incorporate a practical component to their degree will be guaranteed a clinical education experience.

- The Monash Law Pathway (including double degrees) is much less expensive than the Melbourne pathway. Additionally, there are a limited number of Melbourne JD CSP places; meaning that even if you gain entry into the Melbourne JD, you may be required to pay full fees (which are outstandingly costly for the average person).

- The Monash Law Students' Society is heavily involved with students studying law at Monash; they run weekly tutorial sessions, peer mentor programs, law camp, first year dinner, parties, competitions, law ball, booze cruises, weekly BBQs, etc. Melbourne has a Law Students' Society too, however I feel like students who are straight out of high school/younger would benefit more from these kinds of things than older students studying the JD.

- Monash has (really, really good) student accomodation [as an on-res student I can personally vouch for this]; whilst Melbourne doesn't offer student accomodation.

- Monash in general, and Monash Law are simply incredible.

The reason Melbourne do not offer undergraduate law is because their courses run in accordance with the 'Melbourne Model' - basically a system similar to America, where only general undergraduate programs are offered (e.g. Arts, Science, Commerce, etc.); rather than both general and specialist undergraduate courses (e.g. Law, Medicine, Teaching, Psychology, Engineering, etc.) I personally am not a fan of the model, but that's just me.

Hope this helps! :)
Title: Re: Difference between Melbourne JD and Monash Undergrad Law?
Post by: Jigsaw on June 17, 2017, 04:06:52 pm
Thank you so much for taking the time to provide responses! Much appreciated :)
Title: Re: Difference between Melbourne JD and Monash Undergrad Law?
Post by: brenden on June 17, 2017, 05:11:43 pm
And to anyone wondering - it's probably easier to transfer from an undergraduate degree to an undergraduate Law degree than it is to gain entry to postgrad Law.
Title: Re: Difference between Melbourne JD and Monash Undergrad Law?
Post by: kbanks on June 18, 2017, 10:40:39 am
Hi guys, stepping up to bat on behalf of the Melbourne JD over the Monash undergrad...

Personally, the main reason I chose to study undergrad and then the Melbourne JD was firstly that it gave me a few years breathing space. To study something like law, you need to have the fire for knowledge in that area, and you need to be incredibly passionate about it, in order to be able to dedicate the necessary time to the study without burning out. A lot of people go into law because they don't know what else to do, and it's not the best reason to choose the degree.

Doing undergrad and then the JD meant a couple of things:
- I had the maturity and the previous experience of studying at a tertiary level when I started law, which was a godsend in helping me through my first semester.
- I had the concrete knowledge that it was exactly what I wanted to do, rather than thinking it was because of the pressure to make a choice in Year 12.

About the Melbourne JD:
- Everyone is so helpful and supportive, I think the fact that we are all a few years older means we have our feet on the ground and are comfortable with our knowledge and skills to the extent that there's no negative competition or nerves getting the better of us (not that Monash would have this in any way shape or form, I can't comment, it's just something I've come to like about the JD)
- The Melbourne Law Students Society are the most wonderful group of people I've ever come across, and the support services that are on campus are phenomenal. Yes, you're studying just law, and yes, 4 subjects of law a semester is a pain, but the support you receive is out of this world.
- That being said, most people don't actually complete the JD in three years. Most people (myself included) do 3 subjects per semester and end up completing the degree in 3.5 years, so there's absolutely no pressure to do it in 3 and burn yourself out.

Side note:
- I also would not have given up my 3 years doing an Arts degree at Melbourne for anything. I studied overseas, made some amazing friends, got involved with the students society, and did all of whilst still being able to relax a little bit on my study (obviously not so much that you don't do well, but still a little bit) which was an awesome feeling after VCE.

If I could go back, I wouldn't have made a different choice.

Conclusions: The Melbourne JD has its advantages in the fact that giving yourself a few more years to decide that law is what you want to do means that you're committed, you're passionate, and you're surrounded by people who are the same. You've also got the undergrad experience behind you to give you the skills and knowledge you need to tackle a postgrad course, and the Melbourne Law School has support coming out of its EARS, so even though a law degree is challenging, I've never felt more secure.
Title: Re: Difference between Melbourne JD and Monash Undergrad Law?
Post by: brenden on June 18, 2017, 10:43:49 am
Hi guys, stepping up to bat on behalf of the Melbourne JD over the Monash undergrad...

Personally, the main reason I chose to study undergrad and then the Melbourne JD was firstly that it gave me a few years breathing space. To study something like law, you need to have the fire for knowledge in that area, and you need to be incredibly passionate about it, in order to be able to dedicate the necessary time to the study without burning out. A lot of people go into law because they don't know what else to do, and it's not the best reason to choose the degree.

Doing undergrad and then the JD meant a couple of things:
- I had the maturity and the previous experience of studying at a tertiary level when I started law, which was a godsend in helping me through my first semester.
- I had the concrete knowledge that it was exactly what I wanted to do, rather than thinking it was because of the pressure to make a choice in Year 12.

About the Melbourne JD:
- Everyone is so helpful and supportive, I think the fact that we are all a few years older means we have our feet on the ground and are comfortable with our knowledge and skills to the extent that there's no negative competition or nerves getting the better of us (not that Monash would have this in any way shape or form, I can't comment, it's just something I've come to like about the JD)
- The Melbourne Law Students Society are the most wonderful group of people I've ever come across, and the support services that are on campus are phenomenal. Yes, you're studying just law, and yes, 4 subjects of law a semester is a pain, but the support you receive is out of this world.
- That being said, most people don't actually complete the JD in three years. Most people (myself included) do 3 subjects per semester and end up completing the degree in 3.5 years, so there's absolutely no pressure to do it in 3 and burn yourself out.

Side note:
- I also would not have given up my 3 years doing an Arts degree at Melbourne for anything. I studied overseas, made some amazing friends, got involved with the students society, and did all of whilst still being able to relax a little bit on my study (obviously not so much that you don't do well, but still a little bit) which was an awesome feeling after VCE.

If I could go back, I wouldn't have made a different choice.

Conclusions: The Melbourne JD has its advantages in the fact that giving yourself a few more years to decide that law is what you want to do means that you're committed, you're passionate, and you're surrounded by people who are the same. You've also got the undergrad experience behind you to give you the skills and knowledge you need to tackle a postgrad course, and the Melbourne Law School has support coming out of its EARS, so even though a law degree is challenging, I've never felt more secure.
Steps up to bat, hits it for 6. Great insight!
Title: Re: Difference between Melbourne JD and Monash Undergrad Law?
Post by: clarke54321 on June 18, 2017, 12:00:54 pm
Hi guys, stepping up to bat on behalf of the Melbourne JD over the Monash undergrad...

Personally, the main reason I chose to study undergrad and then the Melbourne JD was firstly that it gave me a few years breathing space. To study something like law, you need to have the fire for knowledge in that area, and you need to be incredibly passionate about it, in order to be able to dedicate the necessary time to the study without burning out. A lot of people go into law because they don't know what else to do, and it's not the best reason to choose the degree.

Doing undergrad and then the JD meant a couple of things:
- I had the maturity and the previous experience of studying at a tertiary level when I started law, which was a godsend in helping me through my first semester.
- I had the concrete knowledge that it was exactly what I wanted to do, rather than thinking it was because of the pressure to make a choice in Year 12.

About the Melbourne JD:
- Everyone is so helpful and supportive, I think the fact that we are all a few years older means we have our feet on the ground and are comfortable with our knowledge and skills to the extent that there's no negative competition or nerves getting the better of us (not that Monash would have this in any way shape or form, I can't comment, it's just something I've come to like about the JD)
- The Melbourne Law Students Society are the most wonderful group of people I've ever come across, and the support services that are on campus are phenomenal. Yes, you're studying just law, and yes, 4 subjects of law a semester is a pain, but the support you receive is out of this world.
- That being said, most people don't actually complete the JD in three years. Most people (myself included) do 3 subjects per semester and end up completing the degree in 3.5 years, so there's absolutely no pressure to do it in 3 and burn yourself out.

Side note:
- I also would not have given up my 3 years doing an Arts degree at Melbourne for anything. I studied overseas, made some amazing friends, got involved with the students society, and did all of whilst still being able to relax a little bit on my study (obviously not so much that you don't do well, but still a little bit) which was an awesome feeling after VCE.

If I could go back, I wouldn't have made a different choice.

Conclusions: The Melbourne JD has its advantages in the fact that giving yourself a few more years to decide that law is what you want to do means that you're committed, you're passionate, and you're surrounded by people who are the same. You've also got the undergrad experience behind you to give you the skills and knowledge you need to tackle a postgrad course, and the Melbourne Law School has support coming out of its EARS, so even though a law degree is challenging, I've never felt more secure.

Thanks for providing this insight! This is the path that I want to take next year for exactly the reasons that you have outlined above. :)

I understand that the JD at Melbourne is extremely competitive. Were you accepted into the JD after your first attempt at the LSAT? Or did it take multiple attempts?
Title: Re: Difference between Melbourne JD and Monash Undergrad Law?
Post by: kbanks on June 18, 2017, 12:37:02 pm
Thanks for providing this insight! This is the path that I want to take next year for exactly the reasons that you have outlined above. :)

I understand that the JD at Melbourne is extremely competitive. Were you accepted into the JD after your first attempt at the LSAT? Or did it take multiple attempts?


Hi :)

The Melbourne JD is competitive, absolutely, but no more so than other postgrad courses. The CSP places are a bit harder to come by, so the level of competition then depends on whether you would be satisfied accepting a full fee place (which is still usually mostly, if not all, covered by government FEE-HELP).

I did get accepted into the JD after my first attempt at the LSAT, but I did accept what is referred to as a 'bursary spot' which is full fee-paying, with a scholarship to cover some of the fees.

So, long story short, it's not as competitive as people make out, as long as you're prepared to accept any place (giving you 300 chances) as opposed to a CSP (giving you 100 chances).

Karly
Title: Re: Difference between Melbourne JD and Monash Undergrad Law?
Post by: clarke54321 on June 18, 2017, 02:46:56 pm
Hi :)

The Melbourne JD is competitive, absolutely, but no more so than other postgrad courses. The CSP places are a bit harder to come by, so the level of competition then depends on whether you would be satisfied accepting a full fee place (which is still usually mostly, if not all, covered by government FEE-HELP).

I did get accepted into the JD after my first attempt at the LSAT, but I did accept what is referred to as a 'bursary spot' which is full fee-paying, with a scholarship to cover some of the fees.

So, long story short, it's not as competitive as people make out, as long as you're prepared to accept any place (giving you 300 chances) as opposed to a CSP (giving you 100 chances).

Karly

Thanks for the info! :)
Title: Re: Difference between Melbourne JD and Monash Undergrad Law?
Post by: Glasses on June 18, 2017, 04:02:49 pm
To study something like law, you need to have the fire for knowledge in that area, and you need to be incredibly passionate about it, in order to be able to dedicate the necessary time to the study without burning out. A lot of people go into law because they don't know what else to do, and it's not the best reason to choose the degree.

This is actually a really great point that I forgot to mention!! I wouldn't recommend law to anyone doing it for the sake of it, because they got a certain ATAR, because their parent(s) want them to study law or because they don't know what they want to do. Personally I am loving studying law and it's been what I've wanted to do for years; however I definitely can see why it wouldn't be for everyone. It can be quite stressful and intense at times, so without a passion and genuine interest in what you're studying (like any course) you're likely to find studying law very difficult and ultimately a waste of your time/life. If you think you might be interested in studying law, by all means do your research, talk to people and *maybe* give it a go - but do not force yourself through a law degree (or any course) if you don't feel passionate about it or enjoy it. On that note, I also wouldn't recommend law to anyone hoping to study it as a 'generalist' degree (which, in recent years, it is becoming perceived as).
Title: Re: Difference between Melbourne JD and Monash Undergrad Law?
Post by: Professor Polonsky on June 18, 2017, 07:44:36 pm
Both law schools are good. It comes down to the inherent differences between an LLB and a JD.

With the Monash LLB, you know you're going to get a CSP law place. This is a very real consideration, imho. To illustrate, even if you get a full-fee JD place (which is by no means guaranteed in itself), you may end up being $70,000 more in debt.

The downside of doing the LLB is that you're essentially locking yourself into a six-year degree, the vast majority of it being law subjects. You have very little space to explore the non-law side. With some degrees, you may get very few electives in your non-law side, and certainly no 'general' electives.

By doing a different degree first, then the JD, you have the chance to properly explore another area before deciding on whether you want to go down the law pathway. Getting yourself into a six-year degree at 18 isn't something one should do lightly, imo. Those extra three years can change your perspective on a lot of things - the world after school can be quite different to what you've experienced so far.

But ... If you know you want to do law, I don't think you can escape the certainty that the LLB gives you.
Title: Re: Difference between Melbourne JD and Monash Undergrad Law?
Post by: brenden on June 18, 2017, 10:30:08 pm
Both law schools are good. It comes down to the inherent differences between an LLB and a JD.

With the Monash LLB, you know you're going to get a CSP law place. This is a very real consideration, imho. To illustrate, even if you get a full-fee JD place (which is by no means guaranteed in itself), you may end up being $70,000 more in debt.

The downside of doing the LLB is that you're essentially locking yourself into a six-year degree, the vast majority of it being law subjects. You have very little space to explore the non-law side. With some degrees, you may get very few electives in your non-law side, and certainly no 'general' electives.

By doing a different degree first, then the JD, you have the chance to properly explore another area before deciding on whether you want to go down the law pathway. Getting yourself into a six-year degree at 18 isn't something one should do lightly, imo. Those extra three years can change your perspective on a lot of things - the world after school can be quite different to what you've experienced so far.

But ... If you know you want to do law, I don't think you can escape the certainty that the LLB gives you.
This perfectly sums up my position.

It's certainly not an easy choice for the conscientious student because, really, conscientiousness could pull you either way.

I'll also add that, you can always exit early from an LLB double degree anyway. A little bit more expensive but, you can still bail on uni after 3 years if you decide that's what you want to do. An appropriate amount of flexibility without an inappropriate cost.
Title: Re: Difference between Melbourne JD and Monash Undergrad Law?
Post by: Glasses on June 19, 2017, 12:09:43 pm
The downside of doing the LLB is that you're essentially locking yourself into a six-year degree, the vast majority of it being law subjects. You have very little space to explore the non-law side. With some degrees, you may get very few electives in your non-law side, and certainly no 'general' electives.

It obviously depends on the university and the specific course - but I just wanted to clarify that (at most, if not all Victorian universities), a standard LLB is 4 years; whilst most double degrees (e.g. Arts/Law, Commerce/Law, Science/Law) are 5 years.
Most students studying the LLB complete a double degree (over 90% starting at Monash law this year anyway) - meaning that most do get to experience and study non-law units; and even students doing the straight LLB at Monash have to complete 4 non-law units too.
Title: Re: Difference between Melbourne JD and Monash Undergrad Law?
Post by: Professor Polonsky on June 21, 2017, 03:09:01 pm
It obviously depends on the university and the specific course - but I just wanted to clarify that (at most, if not all Victorian universities), a standard LLB is 4 years; whilst most double degrees (e.g. Arts/Law, Commerce/Law, Science/Law) are 5 years.
Most students studying the LLB complete a double degree (over 90% starting at Monash law this year anyway) - meaning that most do get to experience and study non-law units; and even students doing the straight LLB at Monash have to complete 4 non-law units too.
I know of very few people who completed the Monash LLB (as a double degree) in less than 5.5 years, with more seem to be taking 6 than 5.5.

[edit] Also I should clarify that my post was directed at comparing the double with a generalist degree followed by the JD. The point is that when you do the double, you're essentially locking yourself into a six-year law degree, and you don't get to experience the non-law side as much as you would have had you taken a degree in it first.
Title: Re: Difference between Melbourne JD and Monash Undergrad Law?
Post by: Glasses on June 21, 2017, 09:44:45 pm
I know of very few people who completed the Monash LLB (as a double degree) in less than 5.5 years, with more seem to be taking 6 than 5.5.

There are definitely some people (especially members on the LSS committee) who underload in some years and therefore take longer; however depending on your non-uni commitments, in my opinion, it is definitely possible to complete the double degree in 5 years.
I'll also note to those reading this that whilst the double degree is a 5.25 year workload, Monash structure the course so that students overload two units at some point or complete two summer units; resulting in the course being completed in 5 years.

The main difference re: time between the two paths is therefore that the Monash path can be completed in a minimum of 5 years; whilst the minimum is 6 years for Melbourne.
Title: Re: Difference between Melbourne JD and Monash Undergrad Law?
Post by: spectroscopy on June 22, 2017, 06:07:55 am
There are some people (especially members on the LSS committee) who underload in some years and therefore take longer; however depending on your non-uni commitments it is definitely possible to complete the double degree in 5 years.
I'll also note to those reading this that whilst the double degree is a 5.5 year workload, Monash structure the course so that students overload two units at some point or complete two summer units (generally arts units); resulting in the course being completed in 5 years.

The main difference re: time between the two paths is therefore that the Monash path can be completed in a minimum of 5 years; whilst the minimum is 6 years for Melbourne.
I mean talking about minimum times gets messy because if you really wanna overload you can do the melbourne uni combo 4.5 years (2+2.5).

you can do your melbourne uni undergrad in 2 years if you overload after your first year and do: 4+1(winter)+4+3(summer overload)+5+2(study abroad/winter subjects)+5 = 24 and it's not even that difficult to pull off (3 in the summer is nowhere near as scary as it sounds) then you can go straight to law the next year and do that in 2.5.   
but the thing is i think the focus on time to complete the degree is irrelevant in most cases anyway. most people don't finish as soon as possible because people enjoy university and like their time there. especially if you spend it doing things like joining clubs/going on exchange/volunteering/joining sports teams/travelling/etc. so if you really wanna overload you can do it in 4.5 but to be honest the argument of time is immaterial in the grand scheme of things. 1 extra year in a 40 odd year career will not mean too much and I think you would be better served enjoying your time at university and just picking the university and degree structure you want more.
I was considering law/commerce double degree as an undergrad but didnt like the fact you can only do subjects from those 2 areas in your degree. at melbourne you can do undergrad commerce with arts/science/anything breadth and then if i wanna do law later i can (but i've changed my mind which is another great thing about 3+3 model).

i really think you should just pick whichever uni you want to go to more/weigh the risks& benefits of going straight to CSP vs not locking yourself in
Title: Re: Difference between Melbourne JD and Monash Undergrad Law?
Post by: Jigsaw on June 24, 2017, 11:35:21 pm
In terms of the Monash JD and UoM JD, are they relatively viewed the same/similarly by potential employers in terms of prestige?
Title: Re: Difference between Melbourne JD and Monash Undergrad Law?
Post by: forbiddensoulxx on July 17, 2017, 06:50:40 pm
Hey guys, just a bit off a tangent. Suppose you don't meet the ATAR for the Monash double degree for law, what would be the best course of option if you still wanted to do law? Would it be to do an internal transfer after a semester or go to another university to do undergrad law or do an undergrad degree, then a JD at either Monash or Melbourne?
Title: Re: Difference between Melbourne JD and Monash Undergrad Law?
Post by: Jigsaw on July 17, 2017, 09:34:22 pm
Hey guys, just a bit off a tangent. Suppose you don't meet the ATAR for the Monash double degree for law, what would be the best course of option if you still wanted to do law? Would it be to do an internal transfer after a semester or go to another university to do undergrad law or do an undergrad degree, then a JD at either Monash or Melbourne?

Adding onto this, will certain employers strictly consider applicants from respectable universities (such as Monash and Melbourne), over courses whereby it is somewhat easier to gain admission into?
Title: Re: Difference between Melbourne JD and Monash Undergrad Law?
Post by: The Raven on July 17, 2017, 11:19:27 pm
Hey guys, just a bit off a tangent. Suppose you don't meet the ATAR for the Monash double degree for law, what would be the best course of option if you still wanted to do law? Would it be to do an internal transfer after a semester or go to another university to do undergrad law or do an undergrad degree, then a JD at either Monash or Melbourne?

This is a tricky question to answer as it depends on your performance in first year uni to be able to get a transfer. If you don't end up doing well enough, you'll be stuck doing a degree you don't want to do. Whereas if you were to do an undergrad and then apply for the postgraduate JD, you will have more time to prepare. It also might help you decide if you really want to do Law. Doing law at another university with a lower entry requirement is also a possibility, however it could restrict your immediate career prospects.
Law is a pretty prestige focused area and depending on what type of law you want to practice, there is a large advantage to going to a Group of 8 Uni like Monash or Melbourne Uni. This is especially the case with high paying corporate law firms.
Title: Re: Difference between Melbourne JD and Monash Undergrad Law?
Post by: brenden on July 18, 2017, 01:47:15 pm
Hey guys, just a bit off a tangent. Suppose you don't meet the ATAR for the Monash double degree for law, what would be the best course of option if you still wanted to do law? Would it be to do an internal transfer after a semester or go to another university to do undergrad law or do an undergrad degree, then a JD at either Monash or Melbourne?
The way I see it, finishing an undergraduate degree with good marks enough to do the JD requires you to do well for three years, consistently.

If you plan to transfer in - you can go HARD in your first year of Uni working for an HD average (which would basically guarantee you entry from Monash undergrad law internal transfer), and then be done with it. IF you have the option - take it. Because it's guaranteed. (Also, getting the option is basically 1 year of work instead of 3 years of work).

Better to transfer internally imo.

Also - better to go to a Go8 uni for Law imo :)
Title: Re: Difference between Melbourne JD and Monash Undergrad Law?
Post by: Glasses on July 18, 2017, 04:13:27 pm
Just to reinforce the above, given how elitist some law employers can be, your employment prospects will almost definitely be better if you attend a G08 uni (in my opinion).

:)
Title: Re: Difference between Melbourne JD and Monash Undergrad Law?
Post by: MathsQuestIsBad on December 06, 2017, 10:05:22 am
Can I get confirmation that guaranteed admission into UoM JD is a >99 ATAR and an undergraduate degree in Melbourne? Cheers!