ATAR Notes: Forum

VCE Stuff => VCE English Studies => VCE Subjects + Help => VCE English Language => Topic started by: The Usual Student on August 02, 2016, 07:37:31 pm

Title: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: The Usual Student on August 02, 2016, 07:37:31 pm
VCE ENGLISH LANGUAGE Q&A THREAD

To go straight to posts from 2018, click here.

What is this thread for?
If you have general questions about the VCE English Language course or how to improve in certain areas, this is the place to ask! 👌

If you're looking for essay marking and feedback, go to the English Language Marking board.


Who can/will answer questions?
Everyone is welcome to contribute; even if you're unsure of yourself, providing different perspectives is incredibly valuable.

Please don't be dissuaded by the fact that you haven't finished Year 12, or didn't score as highly as others, or your advice contradicts something else you've seen on this thread, or whatever; none of this disqualifies you from helping others. And if you're worried you do have some sort of misconception, put it out there and someone else can clarify and modify your understanding! 

There'll be a whole bunch of other high-scoring students with their own wealths of wisdom to share with you, including TuteSmart tutors! So you may even get multiple answers from different people offering their insights - very cool.


To ask a question or make a post, you will first need an ATAR Notes account. You probably already have one, but if you don't, it takes about four seconds to sign up - and completely free!


OTHER ENGLISH LANGUAGE RESOURCES


Original post.
Hey guys,
In an effort to get people talking more I decided to make a question thread. I don't even know why we don't have one yet considering the difficulty of this subject.

Feel free to post questions regarding metalanguage, grammar and general EL stuff here but if you want us to look at an essay we already have a thread for that English Language essay submission and marking

Have fun! If this thread takes off I will sticky it for future reference

---

NOTE: To post in this thread, you'll first need to register an ATAR Notes account. It's free, and should take like four seconds! Then, just scroll down to the bottom of this thread, and ask your questions in the "Quick Reply" box, as shown below. :)

(http://i.imgur.com/1rD8v2V.png)
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: The Usual Student on August 02, 2016, 07:38:38 pm
Just to start off,
Can anyone explain the difference between a dialect and a variety of language? Or are they one in the same?
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: literally lauren on August 03, 2016, 03:35:43 pm
Just to start off,
Can anyone explain the difference between a dialect and a variety of language? Or are they one in the same?
I'll give you the definitions I'm familiar with at a tertiary level, though keep in mind that I didn't do Englang and there are some things that this subject modifies for the sake of clarity.

Broadly speaking, varieties of language are mutually intelligible. For example, the variety of language that you use to address your friends in informal settings is something that your grandparents could understand, even if they don't really speak that variety. Likewise, you could listen to AAVE and you'd get the general gist of it.

Dialects on the other hand, are more distinct varieties that (cross-linguistically) may or may not be mutually intelligible.

Unfortunately, English doesn't really have as clear a distinction between dialects and variants, which is why you will probably see the terms used interchangeably in textbooks or analyses. The best way to think about it is like this:

(http://i.imgur.com/hDccYRM.png)

Let's say there are five different language clusters, represented as A-E. Now, each of these communities are fairly shy, and they don't like fraternising outside of their immediate area. As such:
 • A tribe only converses with B tribe
 • B tribe converses with A and C tribes
 • C tribe converses with B and D tribes
 • D tribe converses with C and E tribes
 • E tribe only converses with D tribe

However, once in a blue moon, all the tribes meet up for an inter-valley market or something, and all the tribes get a chance to mingle. BUT
 • A tribe can't understand C, D, or E tribes
 • B tribe can't understand D or E tribes
 • C tribe can't understand A or E tribes
 • D tribe can't understand A or B tribes
 • E tribe can't understand A, B, or C tribes

Suppose you're a linguist tasked with classifying this/these language(s) - what do you do? Are they all speaking different languages? If so, why can C tribe understand D tribe? Or are they dialects of the same language? In that case, why can't A tribe understand E tribe?

This is a problem English doesn't really have to face, as you could gather up a Australian, New Zealander, Scottish, British, and American speaker, and outside of the really outrageous accents, they'd probably be able to understand one another. But in other languages, the differences are such that if you take one speaker (from 'tribe A') and another (from 'tribe E') they'd have no idea what the other person was saying. For example, if you took someone from Sicily in the south of Italy and made them listen to a speaker from Vincenza in the north (and the Vincenzan speaker was talking as they would with their Vincenzan pals rather than in 'Standard Italian') then the Sicilian would have a fairly tough time working out what was going on.

Both 'dialect' and 'variety' are kind of umbrella terms used to capture some highly diverse kinds of language contrasts, though, so the use of those terms is sometimes a bit idiosyncratic... I've had two lecturers within the one subject take completely different stances on what constitutes a 'dialect' as opposed to a 'variety,' so there's not a lot of consensus here, in my experience :P

tldr: varieties are more socially determined language clusters that are used amongst speaking communities; dialects tend to be more historically/geographically/politically determined distinctions. Tbh my impression is that whilst one is often more appropriate (and you'll probably look at varieties more often than dialects, so I'm guessing it's the former), an Englang assessor wouldn't be confused if you were using the other :)
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: The Usual Student on August 04, 2016, 08:03:28 pm
I'll give you the definitions I'm familiar with at a tertiary level, though keep in mind that I didn't do Englang and there are some things that this subject modifies for the sake of clarity.

Broadly speaking, varieties of language are mutually intelligible. For example, the variety of language that you use to address your friends in informal settings is something that your grandparents could understand, even if they don't really speak that variety. Likewise, you could listen to AAVE and you'd get the general gist of it.

Dialects on the other hand, are more distinct varieties that (cross-linguistically) may or may not be mutually intelligible.

Unfortunately, English doesn't really have as clear a distinction between dialects and variants, which is why you will probably see the terms used interchangeably in textbooks or analyses. The best way to think about it is like this:

(http://i.imgur.com/hDccYRM.png)

Let's say there are five different language clusters, represented as A-E. Now, each of these communities are fairly shy, and they don't like fraternising outside of their immediate area. As such:
 • A tribe only converses with B tribe
 • B tribe converses with A and C tribes
 • C tribe converses with B and D tribes
 • D tribe converses with C and E tribes
 • E tribe only converses with D tribe

However, once in a blue moon, all the tribes meet up for an inter-valley market or something, and all the tribes get a chance to mingle. BUT
 • A tribe can't understand C, D, or E tribes
 • B tribe can't understand D or E tribes
 • C tribe can't understand A or E tribes
 • D tribe can't understand A or B tribes
 • E tribe can't understand A, B, or C tribes

Suppose you're a linguist tasked with classifying this/these language(s) - what do you do? Are they all speaking different languages? If so, why can C tribe understand D tribe? Or are they dialects of the same language? In that case, why can't A tribe understand E tribe?

This is a problem English doesn't really have to face, as you could gather up a Australian, New Zealander, Scottish, British, and American speaker, and outside of the really outrageous accents, they'd probably be able to understand one another. But in other languages, the differences are such that if you take one speaker (from 'tribe A') and another (from 'tribe E') they'd have no idea what the other person was saying. For example, if you took someone from Sicily in the south of Italy and made them listen to a speaker from Vincenza in the north (and the Vincenzan speaker was talking as they would with their Vincenzan pals rather than in 'Standard Italian') then the Sicilian would have a fairly tough time working out what was going on.

Both 'dialect' and 'variety' are kind of umbrella terms used to capture some highly diverse kinds of language contrasts, though, so the use of those terms is sometimes a bit idiosyncratic... I've had two lecturers within the one subject take completely different stances on what constitutes a 'dialect' as opposed to a 'variety,' so there's not a lot of consensus here, in my experience :P

tldr: varieties are more socially determined language clusters that are used amongst speaking communities; dialects tend to be more historically/geographically/politically determined distinctions. Tbh my impression is that whilst one is often more appropriate (and you'll probably look at varieties more often than dialects, so I'm guessing it's the former), an Englang assessor wouldn't be confused if you were using the other :)

WOW, stellar answer Lauren!
Thanks so much!

EDIT: Decided to stick this thread anyway, just so its more convenient for people to use.
COME ON GUYS! I am not the only EL kid out there :P
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: MB_ on October 03, 2016, 09:08:31 pm
Does anyone have any tips for getting better at analysing texts? I've got back into doing ACs but didn't realise how difficult it was to find the best and most relevant key features of a text under time pressure. Also would someone be able to help in identifying key features of this text. This text is from the travel blog 'Happiness and Things' which is authored and maintained by Silke Elzner. Silke is a German born, Sydney resident who is a travel enthusiast and the mother of two. Her travel blogs are about quick getaways for families and couples,

Any help is much appreciated!

Text
Spoiler
Australia’s Gold Digging Past at Sovereign Hill

I love history! There, I said it. I am officially a history nerd. So when my Melburnian friend asked me whether I would like to see Sovereign Hill I naturally jumped at the opportunity. Little did I know how fantastic a place this would be.

Sovereign Hill is an outdoor museum about Australia’s days during the famous gold rush. It’s a replica frontier town complete with main street, shops, an industrial complex, civic buildings, a theatre, a slum, and of course a mine. It’s huge. It’s like a Disneyland for history lovers – the size really surprised me.

But not just the size is exceptional for an outdoor museum like this – it’s the many, many details that are truly astounding. Just take a self-guided tour through the many shops along the main street – all of them open for business – where you can look at the pharmacy’s inventory, or check out what the sweets shop has on offer… the interiors are just lovely up to the very detail, polished wooden surfaces, lots and lots of drawers, handwritten labels, old-fashioned packaging. Shop assistants are, of course, in costume and sometimes in character. And all of them extremely knowledgable about their specific trade and the history of nearby Ballarat.

There’s the sweets shop and the soap shop, the jeweller, the photographer and lots lots more! Expect to spend some money here to purchase some traditional candy or other beautifully packed souvenirs. What I really loved was that the bakery for example would only sell “old-fashioned” soft drinks like ginger beer and not coca-cola.

Then there is the whole industrial complex awaiting you. Again, I was totally surprised by the size of the whole area – you can watch the artisans and craftspeople at work, working metal, making candles, boiling sweets. The most impressive bit is probably the wheelwright, with the hole shed used up by a massive original-looking machine that would noisily do its work of making wheels. Or the lovely girls at the candle works who would show you the painstakingly slow art of candle making.

Residential areas encompass a whole village with workers’ huts (where you can see a meat safe, something I never knew existed), and the picket-fenced white houses of the richer residents, plus a whole Chinese community complete with makeshift tents and a Buddhist temple (where you can light an incense stick, if you like). This is also where the kids can try their luck panning for gold in the little river that flows alongside the camp.

Speaking of gold – this is of course the main reason this part of Australia was populated in the first place. The little town of Ballarat next door is a prime example of the endeavours of the first settlers and pioneers. Sovereign Hill has its very own mine where you can learn everything about the business of gold mining. However, this is an attraction that will set you back some extra dollars, so in the end we decided to take the smaller mining tour which is included in the regular ticket price. It is a bit corny… with voices coming from a tape and the group being guided through a network of underground tunnels that take turns in telling you a story about the dangers and rewards of gold digging, but at the end of the day I am sure the kids in particular will love it.

Museum staff (and I am sure many of them volunteers) are all wearing traditional dresses, and there are many smaller, random acts that you can witness. There’s the hobo lady and the policeman, the theatre director and so many other characters who ensure that these buildings are not just a scene but also a place with lots and lots of stories to tell. Their interactions and conversations happen in the main street rather spontaneously, something that delights not just the children but also the grown-ups.

It is probably not the cheapest attraction in Australia but the scale of the operations and the love for detail justifies the price you will pay. In my view a great experience not just for the kids (besides, very educational, too!) but also for the adults. I certainly had a blast exploring the different areas of Sovereign Hill and chatting to the people who work the stores and the workshops. Unfortunately, I didn’t bring the kids but Sovereign Hill is definitely a museum that I will make sure they will visit before they have grown up. Highly recommended!

Sovereign Hill, Bradshaw Street, Ballarat VIC. http://www.sovereignhill.com.au/
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: The Usual Student on October 11, 2016, 05:10:56 pm
Anyone know if "soccer in soccer oval" is a noun modifier or a adjective? So is it a noun or an adjective
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Ahmad_A_1999 on March 28, 2017, 07:49:37 pm
This was a question that came up on my informal language SAC and was worth 1 mark, it asked for what type of phrase is this, (the phrase is highlighted in the attached image), I said it was a prepositional phrase, the teacher was looking for 'adverbial', why am I incorrect? Please help  :)
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: cookiedream on March 28, 2017, 09:35:13 pm
Does anyone have any tips for getting better at analysing texts? I've got back into doing ACs but didn't realise how difficult it was to find the best and most relevant key features of a text under time pressure. Also would someone be able to help in identifying key features of this text. This text is from the travel blog 'Happiness and Things' which is authored and maintained by Silke Elzner. Silke is a German born, Sydney resident who is a travel enthusiast and the mother of two. Her travel blogs are about quick getaways for families and couples,

Any help is much appreciated!

Text
Spoiler
Australia’s Gold Digging Past at Sovereign Hill

I love history! There, I said it. I am officially a history nerd. So when my Melburnian friend asked me whether I would like to see Sovereign Hill I naturally jumped at the opportunity. Little did I know how fantastic a place this would be.

Sovereign Hill is an outdoor museum about Australia’s days during the famous gold rush. It’s a replica frontier town complete with main street, shops, an industrial complex, civic buildings, a theatre, a slum, and of course a mine. It’s huge. It’s like a Disneyland for history lovers – the size really surprised me.

But not just the size is exceptional for an outdoor museum like this – it’s the many, many details that are truly astounding. Just take a self-guided tour through the many shops along the main street – all of them open for business – where you can look at the pharmacy’s inventory, or check out what the sweets shop has on offer… the interiors are just lovely up to the very detail, polished wooden surfaces, lots and lots of drawers, handwritten labels, old-fashioned packaging. Shop assistants are, of course, in costume and sometimes in character. And all of them extremely knowledgable about their specific trade and the history of nearby Ballarat.

There’s the sweets shop and the soap shop, the jeweller, the photographer and lots lots more! Expect to spend some money here to purchase some traditional candy or other beautifully packed souvenirs. What I really loved was that the bakery for example would only sell “old-fashioned” soft drinks like ginger beer and not coca-cola.

Then there is the whole industrial complex awaiting you. Again, I was totally surprised by the size of the whole area – you can watch the artisans and craftspeople at work, working metal, making candles, boiling sweets. The most impressive bit is probably the wheelwright, with the hole shed used up by a massive original-looking machine that would noisily do its work of making wheels. Or the lovely girls at the candle works who would show you the painstakingly slow art of candle making.

Residential areas encompass a whole village with workers’ huts (where you can see a meat safe, something I never knew existed), and the picket-fenced white houses of the richer residents, plus a whole Chinese community complete with makeshift tents and a Buddhist temple (where you can light an incense stick, if you like). This is also where the kids can try their luck panning for gold in the little river that flows alongside the camp.

Speaking of gold – this is of course the main reason this part of Australia was populated in the first place. The little town of Ballarat next door is a prime example of the endeavours of the first settlers and pioneers. Sovereign Hill has its very own mine where you can learn everything about the business of gold mining. However, this is an attraction that will set you back some extra dollars, so in the end we decided to take the smaller mining tour which is included in the regular ticket price. It is a bit corny… with voices coming from a tape and the group being guided through a network of underground tunnels that take turns in telling you a story about the dangers and rewards of gold digging, but at the end of the day I am sure the kids in particular will love it.

Museum staff (and I am sure many of them volunteers) are all wearing traditional dresses, and there are many smaller, random acts that you can witness. There’s the hobo lady and the policeman, the theatre director and so many other characters who ensure that these buildings are not just a scene but also a place with lots and lots of stories to tell. Their interactions and conversations happen in the main street rather spontaneously, something that delights not just the children but also the grown-ups.

It is probably not the cheapest attraction in Australia but the scale of the operations and the love for detail justifies the price you will pay. In my view a great experience not just for the kids (besides, very educational, too!) but also for the adults. I certainly had a blast exploring the different areas of Sovereign Hill and chatting to the people who work the stores and the workshops. Unfortunately, I didn’t bring the kids but Sovereign Hill is definitely a museum that I will make sure they will visit before they have grown up. Highly recommended!

Sovereign Hill, Bradshaw Street, Ballarat VIC. http://www.sovereignhill.com.au/
(EDIT: Just realised that this post and the post after is quite old. But I'll put up my answers anyway for everyone else ^^)
Well, what I do when I'm analysing texts is that I look for any language choices which may support the sociolinguistic variables relevant to the text. I ask myself: "Why does the writer/speaker use this? Why does this exist??" So for this one, I'll list some:
- "it" in "There, I said it" is an example of anaphoric referencing, which supports the cohesion of the text
- Abundance of declaratives is indicative of its informative function to the blog readers
- "But" (para 3) : Starting a sentence with a co-ordinating conjunction contributes to informality
- Contractions like "it's" support informality
- Listing, such as in "working metal, making candles, boiling sweets" allows Silke to expand on the characteristics of the artisans and craftspeople, further supporting the informative function
etc etc

Anyone know if "soccer in soccer oval" is a noun modifier or a adjective? So is it a noun or an adjective

"In soccer oval" is a prepositional phrase specifically, as it describes where soccer is occurring. So technically you could say it's modifying the noun "soccer". An adjective would be something like "amazing" soccer or "grueling" soccer. So "in soccer oval" is not an adjective, it's a phrase.

This was a question that came up on my informal language SAC and was worth 1 mark, it asked for what type of phrase is this, (the phrase is highlighted in the attached image), I said it was a prepositional phrase, the teacher was looking for 'adverbial', why am I incorrect? Please help  :)

Prepositional phrases describe the position of something; where exactly something is occurring (e.g. in the oval, under the table, beside the bed). So in this instance it's more appropriate to describe it as an adverbial. Adverbials cover things like time, place and manner (e.g. after dinner, over the mountain). So because "this time around" describes that now in this version of 'Beauty and the Beast' Belle is a stronger heroine, it's an adverbial.

I suggest that for future questions, go to this thread: Looking toward 2017: ask your English Language questions here
It's more active than this one, at the moment anyway :)
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Ssuper_19 on April 22, 2017, 02:31:24 pm
Hi guys,
I was just wondering if anyone could give a list of essay topics for Unit 1/2 of English Language. I've looked everywhere but I don't really seem to find essay topics for unit 1/2.
Thanks.
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: QueenSmarty on April 22, 2017, 04:56:47 pm
Would the phrase "in the wake of" in the sentence "This decision comes in the wake of two years of frustrating experience with this department" be an idiom or a metaphor?
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: lilhoo on April 23, 2017, 02:38:28 pm
Hey guys,
In an effort to get people talking more I decided to make a question thread. I don't even know why we don't have one yet considering the difficulty of this subject.

Feel free to post questions regarding metalanguage, grammar and general EL stuff here but if you want us to look at an essay we already have a thread for that English Language essay submission and marking

Have fun! If this thread takes off I will sticky it for future reference

Hi all,
Does anyone have any advice for remembering the IPA in preparation of an outcome (Unit 1, AOS 1) since I'm finding it pretty difficult to transcribe the words as well as remembering the symbols?
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Joseph41 on April 24, 2017, 10:16:43 am
Hi guys,
I was just wondering if anyone could give a list of essay topics for Unit 1/2 of English Language. I've looked everywhere but I don't really seem to find essay topics for unit 1/2.
Thanks.

Hey Ssuper_19! ;D

Great question - 1/2 subjects are often under-resourced. Unfortunately, EngLang 1/2 for me was six years ago, and my little ol' noggin' is struggling to remember the key concepts covered haha. But if you list the topics you've covered thus far, I can create you some essay topics. :) I'm not aware of any collection of 1/2 essay topics at this stage.

Would the phrase "in the wake of" in the sentence "This decision comes in the wake of two years of frustrating experience with this department" be an idiom or a metaphor?

I'd be arguing idiom, but I'm honestly not 100% sure on this one.

Hi all,
Does anyone have any advice for remembering the IPA in preparation of an outcome (Unit 1, AOS 1) since I'm finding it pretty difficult to transcribe the words as well as remembering the symbols?

The IPA is hard - I feel you. My best advice is simply to play around with an interactive IPA. :) Click the symbol, and it plays the relevant sound.

Most symbols you'll be familiar with already, and there are realistically not that many more you'll need to know (as English has finite sounds). :)
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: lilhoo on April 25, 2017, 01:08:46 pm
Hey guys,
In an effort to get people talking more I decided to make a question thread. I don't even know why we don't have one yet considering the difficulty of this subject.
Does anyone have any practice outcomes for Unit 1: AOS 1 (Subsystems and nature and functions of language)? Outcome-style questions would also be appreciated as I have no experience in tackling such questions. Thank you so much,
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: lillianmaher on April 25, 2017, 01:21:14 pm
Hi guys,
My teacher is focusing alot on cohesion and coherence, and we have to write a 300-450 word commentary on just cohesion. I was wondering if someone is able to show me an example of a paragraph or a couple of sentences which analyse cohesion to give me an idea of how and what I should be writing please?
Thanks in advance!
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Joseph41 on April 25, 2017, 01:27:08 pm
Hi guys,
My teacher is focusing alot on cohesion and coherence, and we have to write a 300-450 word commentary on just cohesion. I was wondering if someone is able to show me an example of a paragraph or a couple of sentences which analyse cohesion to give me an idea of how and what I should be writing please?
Thanks in advance!

Hey, lillianmaher! Welcome to the forums. ;D

Is this on a particular text? :)
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: lillianmaher on April 25, 2017, 01:53:32 pm
Hey, lillianmaher! Welcome to the forums. ;D

Is this on a particular text? :)

Hi, thank you!
This is on Tony Abbot's 2014 Anzac Day Reflection.
We have gone through and identified the features which make it cohesive, however, I am unsure of how to put it all together into a commentary!
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Joseph41 on April 30, 2017, 04:28:28 pm
Hi, thank you!
This is on Tony Abbot's 2014 Anzac Day Reflection.
We have gone through and identified the features which make it cohesive, however, I am unsure of how to put it all together into a commentary!

Cool! Why don't you have a go at it first? That way, we can sort of work through it together. :3

P.S. Coherence and cohesion are hard - I never liked them lol.
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Ahmad_A_1999 on May 03, 2017, 12:15:03 pm
Hey guys! I was just wondering what textbook other schools use for English Language?
Thanks in advance.
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: cookiedream on May 03, 2017, 11:46:26 pm
Hey guys! I was just wondering what textbook other schools use for English Language?
Thanks in advance.
Hello!
Our school uses the Living Lingo textbook, where one of the authors is the chief examiner (I'm pretty sure!)
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Joseph41 on May 04, 2017, 07:32:17 am
Hello!
Our school uses the Living Lingo textbook, where one of the authors is the chief examiner (I'm pretty sure!)

Which co-author are you referring to, out of interest?
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: cookiedream on May 04, 2017, 07:55:20 am
Which co-author are you referring to, out of interest?

Pretty sure it says at the start that Debbie de Laps is the chief assessor. But I might be wrong, or I might have read it wrong..
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Joseph41 on May 04, 2017, 08:07:55 am
Pretty sure it says at the start that Debbie de Laps is the chief assessor. But I might be wrong, or I might have read it wrong..

Really interesting! I also used that textbook, but I never knew that - clearly I didn't read it much hahaha. ;D
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: QueenSmarty on May 05, 2017, 08:39:48 pm
Hello everyone!
Does anyone know how antonymy can be used to create lexical cohesion in a text?
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: cookiedream on May 06, 2017, 01:30:11 pm
Hello everyone!
Does anyone know how antonymy can be used to create lexical cohesion in a text?

As far as I know, antonymy generally allows linkage and emphasis through contrast. It can also help clarify something and help readers/listeners in making sense of a discourse. It depends on context (like pretty much everything in Eng Lang)
So for example: Antonymy is employed in "I like soft pillows, not hard ones" (insert random line number), where the antonyms "soft" and "hard" are employed to reinforce and emphasise the message that the writer desires soft pillows.

EDIT: VCAA 2008 question 5 was on antonymy and cohesion. The examination report said this for antonymy:

Spoiler
Antonymy in this text creates cohesion by providing a contrast and providing a link between opposing ideas. For example, "little" contrasts with "giant", "huge" and "great".
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: lillianmaher on June 03, 2017, 07:48:45 pm
Hello,
Could you please help me with the different possible functions of texts?
I'm currently writing an analytical commentary on the transcript of Quentin Bryce's Swearing in ceremony as Governor General, but I'm not sure what the function would be.
Thanks
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: exit on June 03, 2017, 08:36:41 pm
Pretty sure it says at the start that Debbie de Laps is the chief assessor. But I might be wrong, or I might have read it wrong..

That doesn't seem right. Are you sure?
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Joseph41 on June 04, 2017, 10:06:19 am
Hello,
Could you please help me with the different possible functions of texts?
I'm currently writing an analytical commentary on the transcript of Quentin Bryce's Swearing in ceremony as Governor General, but I'm not sure what the function would be.
Thanks

What's your best guess at the moment? :)
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: lillianmaher on June 04, 2017, 07:04:06 pm
What's your best guess at the moment? :)

Because it is a television broadcast of the ceremony (we have the written transcript) would the function be 'to inform' the viewers of the proceedings? I'm unsure if I were to mention the function of the ceremony, what it would be in simple terms, because obviously the purpose is to swear her in as governor general, but I'm unsure of the simple function of this.
Thanks for your help
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Joseph41 on June 05, 2017, 05:28:33 pm
Because it is a television broadcast of the ceremony (we have the written transcript) would the function be 'to inform' the viewers of the proceedings? I'm unsure if I were to mention the function of the ceremony, what it would be in simple terms, because obviously the purpose is to swear her in as governor general, but I'm unsure of the simple function of this.
Thanks for your help

Hmm that's actually a bit tricky. On the assumption that you're analysing the broadcast rather than the event itself (which I assume you are), I think I agree with "to inform". :) You're right, though - it's certainly the case that the actual function is to swear in Quentin Bryce haha.

Good question - would be interested in others' opinions! :)
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Ssuper_19 on June 20, 2017, 12:10:57 pm
Hey guys
I just have a question and was hoping if someone would help me.
I was wondering what type of sentence this is.
"Children who are never spoken to will not acquire language."
I thought it was simple but my teacher says because there are two verb that it is compound or complex with the sentence being ellipsed.
Thanks,
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: exit on June 20, 2017, 06:43:37 pm
Hey guys
I just have a question and was hoping if someone would help me.
I was wondering what type of sentence this is.
"Children who are never spoken to will not acquire language."
I thought it was simple but my teacher says because there are two verb that it is compound or complex with the sentence being ellipsed.
Thanks,

It should be complex due to the relative clause and the 'conjunction' here is who.

Don't quote me though. Wouldn't your teacher know?
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Mimosa on July 02, 2017, 01:06:59 am
How do you define lexical patterning? I'm a bit unsure of what it exactly means, any help would be really appreciated.
Thanks in advance! :D
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: cookiedream on July 02, 2017, 08:50:19 am
How do you define lexical patterning? I'm a bit unsure of what it exactly means, any help would be really appreciated.
Thanks in advance! :D

Well, patterning itself is always deliberate and serves the purpose of emphasis or other specific effects (they're pretty much stylistic features). As far as I know, the only lexical patterning defined in the study design is lexical repetition.
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Mimosa on July 02, 2017, 12:18:10 pm
Well, patterning itself is always deliberate and serves the purpose of emphasis or other specific effects (they're pretty much stylistic features). As far as I know, the only lexical patterning defined in the study design is lexical repetition.
Thank you! That makes sense, I think I got it now.
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Caitae on July 11, 2017, 06:23:22 pm
Not sure if relevant or not but here goes anyways:
I am currently undertaking Legal Studies 1/2, however, I have never planned on continuing it into 3/4 and had always planned on undertaking English Language 3/4 by distance instead (we don't have it as an option at my school and the distance education centre near me only offered it for units 3/4). I'm starting to reconsider my decision as many have said its a really hard subject... Would you recommend still doing the subject? Keep in mind I have not done units 1/2 and I would be doing the subject by distance. Am I just setting myself up for failure or is it possible??
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: strawberry7898 on July 11, 2017, 09:06:44 pm
Not sure if relevant or not but here goes anyways:
I am currently undertaking Legal Studies 1/2, however, I have never planned on continuing it into 3/4 and had always planned on undertaking English Language 3/4 by distance instead (we don't have it as an option at my school and the distance education centre near me only offered it for units 3/4). I'm starting to reconsider my decision as many have said its a really hard subject... Would you recommend still doing the subject? Keep in mind I have not done units 1/2 and I would be doing the subject by distance. Am I just setting myself up for failure or is it possible??

I know someone who has not done 1/2 and is doing 3/4 by distance, and it definitely can be done. The only real relevant part of 1/2 for 3/4 is the grammar bit we did at the start (Just grab the study design, go to the "metalanguage" section for Units 1/2 and use the internet to make sure you understand all the terms that overlap with the metalanguage list for Units 3/4, get a book that covers grammar to help you out if you feel like you need a resource)- you can cover this on your own and will be covered in some detail in 3/4 anyways. As for the distance education bit, English Language involves a large amount of self study anyways imo. Look into the subject a bit more and see if you definitely want to do it. As long as you have an interest in the subject and are decent in essay writing I'd say you're set. Hope that makes your decision a little easier.
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Bri MT on July 12, 2017, 08:56:39 am
I am currently doing 3/4 EL by distance and didn't do units 1&2. I assure you it is definitely possible, and I do not regret my decision. You will need to be prepared for the fact that it may take you a long time to get feedback and you WILL need to self-motivate. I would wholly recommend reading some of the exemplar ACs and essays so you can get a feel for the writing style and type of content before making this decision. There are some people in my class who do regret making this decision so there is an element of risk involved, and you need to be aware of that. 
Over the summer holidays I studied and got to a stage where I knew the metalanguage better than most people who studied units 1&2 which was very useful, and I would recommend that you do the same if you decide to follow this path.
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Sine on July 12, 2017, 11:20:46 am
Not sure if relevant or not but here goes anyways:
I am currently undertaking Legal Studies 1/2, however, I have never planned on continuing it into 3/4 and had always planned on undertaking English Language 3/4 by distance instead (we don't have it as an option at my school and the distance education centre near me only offered it for units 3/4). I'm starting to reconsider my decision as many have said its a really hard subject... Would you recommend still doing the subject? Keep in mind I have not done units 1/2 and I would be doing the subject by distance. Am I just setting myself up for failure or is it possible??
Definitely possible to do well imo if you are focused and motivated enough anyone has the chance to succeed.

Some anecdotal evidence - one of my friends did english language (having not done 1/2) by distance and they did extremely well ending up getting a study score of 45+
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Caitae on July 12, 2017, 12:51:29 pm
I know someone who has not done 1/2 and is doing 3/4 by distance, and it definitely can be done. The only real relevant part of 1/2 for 3/4 is the grammar bit we did at the start (Just grab the study design, go to the "metalanguage" section for Units 1/2 and use the internet to make sure you understand all the terms that overlap with the metalanguage list for Units 3/4, get a book that covers grammar to help you out if you feel like you need a resource)- you can cover this on your own and will be covered in some detail in 3/4 anyways. As for the distance education bit, English Language involves a large amount of self study anyways imo. Look into the subject a bit more and see if you definitely want to do it. As long as you have an interest in the subject and are decent in essay writing I'd say you're set. Hope that makes your decision a little easier.

Thanks for replying.... From the responses I've got I think I'm going to still pursue English Language. Its an interesting subject and will prepare me really well for what I want to do for my tertiary studies.  Plus, if I just study my butt off during the summer holidays I think I might get a good head start ; ) 
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: -273.15 on July 28, 2017, 12:11:53 pm
Hello :)
Could someone please give some me names of some good websites/resources that outline the history of Australian English?
(have already seen sounds of Oz)

Thanks!
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: koreaboo99 on August 01, 2017, 10:06:57 pm
Hey guys,
This is a very dumb question, but the more I study it, the more I get confused over the difference between morphology and lexicology, and lexicology and semantics.  So yeah, what is the difference between morphology and lexicology, and lexicology and semantics? 

Also, my book lists the metalang of morphology and lexicology under one heading basically, so I've tried to separate out the terms (I've sorted them out into categories, because there are like 1048567 individual terms) into each respective subsystem - am I correct?
Affixation - morphology
word classes - morphology
function and content words - lexicology
word formation processes - morphology
word loss - ???
(gosh now looking at it, where is all my metalang for lexicology?)

Thank you :)
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: eru on August 01, 2017, 11:06:18 pm
Hey guys,
This is a very dumb question, but the more I study it, the more I get confused over the difference between morphology and lexicology, and lexicology and semantics.  So yeah, what is the difference between morphology and lexicology, and lexicology and semantics? 

Also, my book lists the metalang of morphology and lexicology under one heading basically, so I've tried to separate out the terms (I've sorted them out into categories, because there are like 1048567 individual terms) into each respective subsystem - am I correct?
Affixation - morphology
word classes - morphology
function and content words - lexicology
word formation processes - morphology
word loss - ???
(gosh now looking at it, where is all my metalang for lexicology?)

Thank you :)

Hi there,
To put it simply, lexicology is the study of words (e.g. biology). Morphology is the study of morphemes, aka the components that make up a word. When studying morphology you’d look at ‘bio’ and ‘-logy’ as separate morphemes. Semantics is the study of meaning, so you’d be looking at things like what biology means in the dictionary, and the connotations of biology.
 
Another way you could think of it is:
Morphology - study of bricks
These bricks are put together to build a house (aka a word)
Lexicology – study of the house

In regards to your categorisation:
Word classes would be under lexicology. If you’re studying a word itself, such as ‘quick’, and categorizing it as an adjective, then it’d be lexicology. I’d say word loss goes under lexicology, because you’re focusing on words and not the meaning or the morphemes. Basically, what you are specifically analysing / focusing on determines the subsystem.

Looking at words? Lexicology. Looking at morphemes? Morphology. Looking at word meaning? Semantics.

Everything else looks right!  :)
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: koreaboo99 on August 02, 2017, 12:59:01 am
Hi there,
To put it simply, lexicology is the study of words (e.g. biology). Morphology is the study of morphemes, aka the components that make up a word. When studying morphology you’d look at ‘bio’ and ‘-logy’ as separate morphemes. Semantics is the study of meaning, so you’d be looking at things like what biology means in the dictionary, and the connotations of biology.
 
Another way you could think of it is:
Morphology - study of bricks
These bricks are put together to build a house (aka a word)
Lexicology – study of the house

In regards to your categorisation:
Word classes would be under lexicology. If you’re studying a word itself, such as ‘quick’, and categorizing it as an adjective, then it’d be lexicology. I’d say word loss goes under lexicology, because you’re focusing on words and not the meaning or the morphemes. Basically, what you are specifically analysing / focusing on determines the subsystem.

Looking at words? Lexicology. Looking at morphemes? Morphology. Looking at word meaning? Semantics.

Everything else looks right!  :)


YOU ARE A LIFE SAVER!!! Thank you so so so much.  Your explanations made so much sense, (why aren't you my teacher?).  Thanks so much ^__^
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: mtDNA on August 25, 2017, 09:09:44 pm
Given a prompt which requires reference to the ‘contemporary Australian context’, how would one go about discussing teenspeak (in an identity essay), particularly with respect to e-com? For instance, slang terms like ‘thicc’ aren’t really Australian, and neither would I identify it as being American; rather, 'a lexeme with no home’.

Thanks in advance  :)
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: EulerFan102 on August 25, 2017, 09:49:09 pm
Given a prompt which requires reference to the ‘contemporary Australian context’, how would one go about discussing teenspeak (in an identity essay), particularly with respect to e-com? For instance, slang terms like ‘thicc’ aren’t really Australian, and neither would I identify it as being American; rather, 'a lexeme with no home’.

Yes, it is a difficult one. Terms of Internet-speak aren't tied to a particular country, instead existing on the globally shared Net. Perhaps that is a point that could be discussed in your essay: has the international nature of the Internet affected or dimished the abundance of Oz-centric slang? If so, has this had future effects on national pride and Australian identity amongst the youth of this country?

In terms of finding examples of Aussie teenspeak, there are a few different sources you could try. A good place to start would be listening to certain Aussie radio stations (particularly Triple J, as they're aiming for a 'young' 'cool' audience). For instance, a quick listen to the podcast of Ben and Liam's show from 24 August 2017 gives plenty of terms like "buck fiddy", "meme" and "rocking" (as in wearing), as well as a discussion of the phrase "sliding into someone's DMs".

If only fb meme pages were more widely accepted as evidence in exam essays... Perhaps Clive Palmer's page is a possible source, given he's got a fair profile, and now he's churning our some dank memes on a regular schedule (such as the one below, from 19 August 2017)

(https://scontent.fmel1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/20882121_1620192381333626_8920794813988790833_n.jpg?oh=0258cf9ac8a14c08645f98155d4763c7&oe=5A229D11)
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: RubyH on September 05, 2017, 11:07:32 am
This is my first anything so I don't even know if I'll get an answer but anyway...
My school has a problem with english language, well actually it's not even the school it's just the principal. I've worked my arse off to try and get it to go ahead (rounding up students and getting support from teachers, the head of english is all for it), but the other day I was talking to my principal around the school and he said 'I can't understand why you want to do it and why you're trying so hard to make it go ahead.' I'm very annoyed and stressed because I don't think it will go ahead and I don't think I could get a decent score in standard english. The decision lies with him but he doesn't believe that anyone would get a good score in it because we're not a top school. It went ahead in past years and been fine but they refuse to run it anymore because a group of students one year treated it as a complete bludge.
My older sister does english language at another school and absolutely loves it. I have a general idea of what it's about but could someone please tell me more about the subject? I understand that it can be quite hard but the students I rounded up are more than capable. Can you tell me all the good things about it so that I can use them against my principal? :)
Thanks, Ruby
Year 10 
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Joseph41 on September 05, 2017, 12:18:34 pm
This is my first anything so I don't even know if I'll get an answer but anyway...
My school has a problem with english language, well actually it's not even the school it's just the principal. I've worked my arse off to try and get it to go ahead (rounding up students and getting support from teachers, the head of english is all for it), but the other day I was talking to my principal around the school and he said 'I can't understand why you want to do it and why you're trying so hard to make it go ahead.' I'm very annoyed and stressed because I don't think it will go ahead and I don't think I could get a decent score in standard english. The decision lies with him but he doesn't believe that anyone would get a good score in it because we're not a top school. It went ahead in past years and been fine but they refuse to run it anymore because a group of students one year treated it as a complete bludge.
My older sister does english language at another school and absolutely loves it. I have a general idea of what it's about but could someone please tell me more about the subject? I understand that it can be quite hard but the students I rounded up are more than capable. Can you tell me all the good things about it so that I can use them against my principal? :)
Thanks, Ruby
Year 10 

Hey Ruby,

Welcome to ATAR Notes! Great to have you here. :)

That sucks about your situation. I think it's pretty common; a lot of schools are hesitant toward EngLang (and Lit). :-\

How many students do you have who are interested at the moment? I really applaud you for working hard for it.

Regarding what English Language actually is, here's a brief overview. For context, I went through English Language 1/2 and 3/4, and then went on to major in Linguistics at uni. The reason I say that is that English Language should really be called Linguistics, because that's what it is. For that reason, English Language is, perhaps, the most relevant subject of them all; language is all around us every single day.

English Language Units 1/2 (Year 11)
Unit 1
In Unit 1 AOS 1, you consider that nature of language, and what differentiates human communication systems from those of other animals. You look at how language results in meaning (super interesting IMO), how language is used for different purposes and in different ways (such as spoken, written, or signed), and how context impacts our language choices. You'll also be introduced to some "metalanguage" (language we use to talk about language): terms like morpheme and lexeme. This type of metalanguage is really important (particularly if you go on to study Linguistics), and is excellent if ever you want to teach English.

In Unit 1 AOS 2, the focus is mostly on language acquisition; that is, how we develop language proficiency. There are stages of child language acquisition, which you'll consider in some depth (again, super interesting). Development can vary between "subsystems" of language, too (basically, the five main areas of language) - and you'll learn about this in terms of phonology, morphology, lexicology, syntax and semantics. There'll further be discussion centred on differences between learning language as a child and an adult, and also differences between monolingualism, bilingualism and multi-lingualism. In an ever-globalised world, this last point is surely of particular importance.

Unit 2
IMO Unit 2 is absolutely fascinating. There's a big emphasis here on the nature of language change, and how English has developed as a language over time. In AOS 1, you look at the development of the language from Old English to contemporary English. This includes things like why the language changed, and what influence it's had on us as citizens. There's also a section on the relationship between English and other languages, and how they may have diverted from the same roots in the past. Further, there's a bunch of stuff on the concept of "Standard English" (very important in Linguistics), plus attitudes toward language, word addition and word loss.

Unit 2 AOS 2 sees more of a focus on the impact of language contact; that is, when languages "collide". Particularly relevant is how English is becoming one of if not the world's most dominant language, and the impact that that will have on us. You will also consider how new languages are formed, including pidgins and creoles. The relationship between language and culture is also considered, which, as you can imagine, is pretty important in today's world.

English Language Units 3/4 (Year 12)
Unit 3
Unit 3 is split in halves, with those halves basically considering informal and formal language. AOS 1 looks at informal language, including key characteristics, the impact of context, stylistic features, and how and why informal language is used.

AOS 2 is essentially the same, but for formal language.

Unit 4
Unit 4 AOS 1 looks more at language variation within the Australian context, including variation along geographical, national, regional and cultural axes. Standard and non-Standard English is again important, and you also consider the nature of accents.

Finally, Unit 4 AOS 2 considers the inherently intertwined (at least IMO) relationship between language and identities: both individual and group. Language variation is again a factor, this time due to personal factors (age, gender, occupation, interests, aspirations, education etc.). The concept of prestige also arises.

P.S. You can find a lot of this information in the English Language study design. :) Please keep us updated with how you get on; I'm really passionate about this!
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: EulerFan102 on September 05, 2017, 12:36:02 pm
[ dang J41, you beat me to it, but I'll just post my response anyway... :P ]

Hey Ruby!
First of all, welcome to the forums :)

Yeah, English Language seems to have a tough time getting into some schools. At my school, it had only been done for a year or two before I did it, and it only got into the school because there was one teacher who was very passionate about spreading the joys of EngLang.

First of all, I applaud you for the effort you've put in thus far. I think EngLang is a really awesome subject, and definitely worth doing. It seems crazy that your principal is against it, especially since you've got the support from students and teachers. Surely the principal of a school should be encouraging passion and enthusiasm for learning. And it's strange that he doesn't think that you'll get a high score, because (a) he should really be supportive and trying to raise his students up, and (b) surely the effort you've put in simply trying to do the subject is very reflective of the effort you'll put in actually studying the subject.

... could someone please tell me more about the subject? I understand that it can be quite hard but the students I rounded up are more than capable.
I was going to write a long spiel but Joseph41's done a beautiful job  ;D

What I will say is that, in my opinion, EngLang is a really powerful subject, and can change the way you look at language. Obviously we use English every day, and studying EngLang (and now linguistics at uni) has made me super aware of all the fascinating uses of language that I see and hear everyday. And besides that, EngLang is just a really fun subject  :D

Best of luck!  ;D
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Bri MT on September 05, 2017, 06:07:38 pm

This is my first anything so I don't even know if I'll get an answer but anyway...
My school has a problem with english language, well actually it's not even the school it's just the principal. I've worked my arse off to try and get it to go ahead (rounding up students and getting support from teachers, the head of english is all for it), but the other day I was talking to my principal around the school and he said 'I can't understand why you want to do it and why you're trying so hard to make it go ahead.' I'm very annoyed and stressed because I don't think it will go ahead and I don't think I could get a decent score in standard english. The decision lies with him but he doesn't believe that anyone would get a good score in it because we're not a top school. It went ahead in past years and been fine but they refuse to run it anymore because a group of students one year treated it as a complete bludge.
My older sister does english language at another school and absolutely loves it. I have a general idea of what it's about but could someone please tell me more about the subject? I understand that it can be quite hard but the students I rounded up are more than capable. Can you tell me all the good things about it so that I can use them against my principal? :)
Thanks, Ruby
Year 10

My school doesn't run it so I'm doing it by distance ed (it took me a year to convince them to let me but now I'm studying the subject I want). If you really want to do eng Lang, consider distance ed if your school won't run it. Distance isn't easy, but I don't regret my decision and if you're as self motivated as you seem I don't think you would either.
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: RubyH on September 06, 2017, 09:36:23 am
First of all, thankyou all so much for replying!!!
This subject sounds amazing and your comments make it even better.

I have rounded up 14, not many but they said we need 12 to have a class... now they're saying it's not based on numbers. I could tear someones head of for this because I actually worked up the guts to send an email to the 200 kids in my year level saying 'hey there's this magical subject they don't tell you about. We should all do it!' We got 14 because our school has this stupid rule that you have to do standard english with english language to help us with pr grammar. Proof that my principal has no idea what we normally do in english. I am an exception because I do french, as well as a few others. I had about 20 replies from people who said they would do it if they didn't have to do 2 englishes. It really sucks.

Anyway, I will keep you all updated. I think it will go ahead based on the fact that I think my principal fears what I will do if it doesn't. Everyone's just kind of waiting to see what I'll do next, hopefully this works in my favour. :)
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: mtDNA on September 08, 2017, 09:23:14 pm
First of all, thankyou all so much for replying!!!
This subject sounds amazing and your comments make it even better.

I have rounded up 14, not many but they said we need 12 to have a class... now they're saying it's not based on numbers. I could tear someones head of for this because I actually worked up the guts to send an email to the 200 kids in my year level saying 'hey there's this magical subject they don't tell you about. We should all do it!' We got 14 because our school has this stupid rule that you have to do standard english with english language to help us with pr grammar. Proof that my principal has no idea what we normally do in english. I am an exception because I do french, as well as a few others. I had about 20 replies from people who said they would do it if they didn't have to do 2 englishes. It really sucks.

Anyway, I will keep you all updated. I think it will go ahead based on the fact that I think my principal fears what I will do if it doesn't. Everyone's just kind of waiting to see what I'll do next, hopefully this works in my favour. :)

Hey RubyH,

Just to add my two cents: generally, schools are a lot more receptive to parents’ concerns than students. As such, it would be wise for you to seek some sort of parental intervention, given the school declines your request. However, in terms of promoting your case, I would perhaps juxtapose your school’s limitations in subject choices to other (successful) schools as a means of persuading him/her, as well as reinforcing the sense of enthusiasm from the cohort. In this circumstance though, you can understand your school’s reluctance to let this pass due to the mistakes of previous classes, so I would sort of negotiate a way for letting your principal to accept your request - whether that be to restrict the students in applying (so students must take english + english language, or perhaps students who do a LOTE or science subjects are preferentially picked) or some other means. Finally, another (sorta cheap but who cares lmao  ;) ) selling point is the fact that eng-lang is the highest scaling English subject, so it would be silly for your school to neglect the subject, particularly due to the rewards one may reap from it.
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: QueenSmarty on September 16, 2017, 10:14:19 am
Would AAE be considered an ethnolect?
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: EulerFan102 on September 16, 2017, 10:53:41 am
Would AAE be considered an ethnolect?

Yes, Australian Aboriginal English would be considered an ethnolect. An ethnolect is a variety associated with a particular cultural or ethnic group, and this is true of AAE. However, keep in mind that there are a number of varieties within AAE.
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: peanut on September 16, 2017, 02:27:33 pm
Is Broad, General and Cultivated Australian English examples of accents or varieties of English?
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Bri MT on September 16, 2017, 02:29:19 pm
Is Broad, General and Cultivated Australian English examples of accents or varieties of English?
Accents
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: CoreyW on September 20, 2017, 07:47:22 pm
Hi All!
Does anyone happen to have any specific Australian examples on doublespeak for the Exam? Anything will be much appreciated.
Thank you!
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: DailyInsanity on September 24, 2017, 01:07:59 am
Hi everyone,

How much emphasis should be placed on studying and preparing (quotes, examples etc...) for essays prompts not linked to identity (assuming that I want to write about identity and language in the exam essay given the chance)? Seeing as that the exam basically always has at least one prompt relating to that area. It seems distracting to focus on other areas, but also extremely risk - any advice?
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: babushka818 on September 24, 2017, 06:04:54 am
Hi everyone,

How much emphasis should be placed on studying and preparing (quotes, examples etc...) for essays prompts not linked to identity (assuming that I want to write about identity and language in the exam essay given the chance)? Seeing as that the exam basically always has at least one prompt relating to that area. It seems distracting to focus on other areas, but also extremely risk - any advice?

It's never possible to predict what you're going to get in the exam. Often all prompts will ask you to relate your response to the Australian context or use Australian examples, but the topics will largely vary. I think you'd make a wise decision to prepare more for identity than formal and informal language, since these areas are already assessed in short answer and AC. You can pretty much count on having at least 1 or 2 essay topics from unit 4 though. Definitely have some examples in mind for all topics, quotes probably not so relevant, as you will still get some examples and quotes from the context provided and the examples are what really makes the foundation of your essay, while quotes more so tie things together which you can do on your own with linking sentences if you don't have quotes for the topic. :)
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Mapleflame on September 28, 2017, 03:46:52 pm
So our teacher gave us a massive metalanguage list, and I'm concerned about one of the examples; I've attached it below. I'm not sure that 'blue' is an abstract noun?
Could someone explain why it is/isn't for me please?
~A.E.H
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Bri MT on September 28, 2017, 05:53:13 pm
So our teacher gave us a massive metalanguage list, and I'm concerned about one of the examples; I've attached it below. I'm not sure that 'blue' is an abstract noun?
Could someone explain why it is/isn't for me please?
~A.E.H

Colour doesn't physically exist, it's just the way that we percieve certain frequencies of light.
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: QueenSmarty on October 01, 2017, 04:58:03 pm
Do euphemisms help to meet positive face needs or negative face needs?
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Bri MT on October 01, 2017, 07:05:02 pm
Do euphemisms help to meet positive face needs or negative face needs?

Positive face needs.
Negative face needs are about having the freedom to say as you wish
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: EulerFan102 on October 01, 2017, 07:07:46 pm
So our teacher gave us a massive metalanguage list, and I'm concerned about one of the examples; I've attached it below. I'm not sure that 'blue' is an abstract noun?
Could someone explain why it is/isn't for me please?
~A.E.H

Hey there!  ;D

So you're right to be a bit suspicious of the label "abstract noun" for "blue" in this instance. That's because it's an adjective in the example sentence. We can rearrange it into the noun phrase "the blue sky", where "blue" is in the classic adjective position between a determiner and a noun. We can also substitute in some very adjective-y adjectives ("as beautiful as the sky", "as big as the sky", "as deceitful as the sky") and these all work, whereas substituting in a noun sounds super weird ("as table as the sky", "as mushroom as the sky"). So it really looks like "blue" is an adjective in this sentence.

Okay, well let's look at this new sentence: "I love the blue of that car." Now this is different. We've still got a determiner before the "blue", but this time it appears to be in the noun position. We can do similar substitutions to before, and this time it's looking like a noun.

So "blue" can be an adjective or a noun. In the example sentence, it's an adjective. As to whether it's an abstract or concrete noun, I guess that depends on your definitions. You can still see blue, but it's not a concrete object. I'd say it's probably more on the abstract noun side of things, but no doubt some linguists would disagree.
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Mapleflame on October 01, 2017, 07:09:48 pm
Hey there!  ;D

So you're right to be a bit suspicious of the label "abstract noun" for "blue" in this instance. That's because it's an adjective in the example sentence. We can rearrange it into the noun phrase "the blue sky", where "blue" is in the classic adjective position between a determiner and a noun. We can also substitute in some very adjective-y adjectives ("as beautiful as the sky", "as big as the sky", "as deceitful as the sky") and these all work, whereas substituting in a noun sounds super weird ("as table as the sky", "as mushroom as the sky"). So it really looks like "blue" is an adjective in this sentence.

Okay, well let's look at this new sentence: "I love the blue of that car." Now this is different. We've still got a determiner before the "blue", but this time it appears to be in the noun position. We can do similar substitutions to before, and this time it's looking like a noun.

So "blue" can be an adjective or a noun. In the example sentence, it's an adjective. As to whether it's an abstract or concrete noun, I guess that depends on your definitions. You can still see blue, but it's not a concrete object. I'd say it's probably more on the abstract noun side of things, but no doubt some linguists would disagree.

Thanks, that helps a lot :)
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: EulerFan102 on October 01, 2017, 07:24:31 pm
Do euphemisms help to meet positive face needs or negative face needs?

In my books, euphemism and face needs are not super related. Euphemisms are closely related to the topic of taboo (to quote the study design: "Students learn that formal language enables users to carefully negotiate social taboos through the employment of euphemisms, non-discriminatory language, and political correctness."). Euphemisms are used to avoid taboo terms. Want to talk about taking a shit? "Going to the bathroom" is a nicer way to discuss that action. Euphemisms can also be used to obscure the truth; politicians do this a lot. These sort of euphemisms are not closely related to face needs.

That being said, there may be some overlap between euphemism and face needs. You could possibly say that using euphemisms maintains a listener's positive face needs, as you could be showing that they're respected/liked enough that you are careful with your language. On the other hand, using taboo terms in close-knit social circles could have a similar effect.
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: RubyH on October 05, 2017, 01:35:46 pm
This is my first anything so I don't even know if I'll get an answer but anyway...
My school has a problem with english language, well actually it's not even the school it's just the principal. I've worked my arse off to try and get it to go ahead (rounding up students and getting support from teachers, the head of english is all for it), but the other day I was talking to my principal around the school and he said 'I can't understand why you want to do it and why you're trying so hard to make it go ahead.' I'm very annoyed and stressed because I don't think it will go ahead and I don't think I could get a decent score in standard english. The decision lies with him but he doesn't believe that anyone would get a good score in it because we're not a top school. It went ahead in past years and been fine but they refuse to run it anymore because a group of students one year treated it as a complete bludge.
My older sister does english language at another school and absolutely loves it. I have a general idea of what it's about but could someone please tell me more about the subject? I understand that it can be quite hard but the students I rounded up are more than capable. Can you tell me all the good things about it so that I can use them against my principal? :)
Thanks, Ruby
Year 10
I have recieved my blocking for next year and english language is going ahead. We also have rumours of the school trying to find a teacher who has taught it successfully somewhere else too. Very happy day. :)
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Joseph41 on October 05, 2017, 01:44:53 pm
I have recieved my blocking for next year and english language is going ahead. We also have rumours of the school trying to find a teacher who has taught it successfully somewhere else too. Very happy day. :)

That's amazing news, Ruby. Seriously stoked to hear that - congratulations!

You're going to love it. Your hard work here will pay off. Let us know if you have any EngLang questions! :D :D :D
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: EulerFan102 on October 05, 2017, 01:52:41 pm
I have recieved my blocking for next year and english language is going ahead. We also have rumours of the school trying to find a teacher who has taught it successfully somewhere else too. Very happy day. :)

Wooohoooo!! That's fantastic news!  ;D ;D ;D ;D
Great to see your efforts have been worth it. Hope you love EngLang  ;D
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: exit on October 15, 2017, 06:01:53 pm
Hi guys. Some things that are terribly confusing me when reading essay topics.. if you could answer that would be super helpful!~:

1. Hows does something qualify as a 'variety' of Australian English?
2. What exactly is Standard Australian English and how does it differ from other varieties?
3. What draws the line between non-Standard English and Standard English?
4. In an essay talking about Standard Australian English and its uses what sort of examples do I use to demonstrate this? Do colloquialisms/shortenings fall within the ambit of SAE?

Much appreciated.
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: EulerFan102 on October 15, 2017, 06:50:37 pm
Hi guys. Some things that are terribly confusing me when reading essay topics.. if you could answer that would be super helpful!~:

1. Hows does something qualify as a 'variety' of Australian English?
2. What exactly is Standard Australian English and how does it differ from other varieties?
3. What draws the line between non-Standard English and Standard English?
4. In an essay talking about Standard Australian English and its uses what sort of examples do I use to demonstrate this? Do colloquialisms/shortenings fall within the ambit of SAE?

Much appreciated.

Hey there!
Great questions  ;D

1. Hmm, interesting one to define. I would say that a 'variety' is a kind of Australian English spoken by a group of people. Obviously a very broad definition, but 'variety' is a very broad term. Often you can label 'varieties' with a more specific bit of metalanguage, like dialect, sociolect and ethnolect. For instance, Lebanese Australian English is a variety of Australian English, more specifically an ethnolect.
2. Standard Australian English is a variety of Australian English that is most often used in formal settings, like parliament and court. It differs from more informal language in many ways. It often has more complex syntactic structures, more jargon, more elevated lexis, more nominalisation and high levels of cohesion and coherence, as well as a lack of sentence fragments, slang and colloquialisms.
3. There is no line between non-Standard and Standard English. Instead, there is a continuum of 'Standard-ness'. For instance, a legal document and a newspaper may both use Standard English, but the legal document was probably 'more' Standard.
4. There are plenty of examples that would be great to use. Parliamentary speeches, legal documents, eulogies and government brochures will all (most likely) be in Standard English. A nice one that I found recently would be Malcolm Turnbull's response to the Manchester bombings earlier this year (video link here). Turnbull's language was very formal and highly standard, as was appropriate for such a serious speech.

Hope these answers help  ;D ;D
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: exit on October 16, 2017, 10:44:35 am
Hey there!
Great questions  ;D

1. Hmm, interesting one to define. I would say that a 'variety' is a kind of Australian English spoken by a group of people. Obviously a very broad definition, but 'variety' is a very broad term. Often you can label 'varieties' with a more specific bit of metalanguage, like dialect, sociolect and ethnolect. For instance, Lebanese Australian English is a variety of Australian English, more specifically an ethnolect.
2. Standard Australian English is a variety of Australian English that is most often used in formal settings, like parliament and court. It differs from more informal language in many ways. It often has more complex syntactic structures, more jargon, more elevated lexis, more nominalisation and high levels of cohesion and coherence, as well as a lack of sentence fragments, slang and colloquialisms.
3. There is no line between non-Standard and Standard English. Instead, there is a continuum of 'Standard-ness'. For instance, a legal document and a newspaper may both use Standard English, but the legal document was probably 'more' Standard.
4. There are plenty of examples that would be great to use. Parliamentary speeches, legal documents, eulogies and government brochures will all (most likely) be in Standard English. A nice one that I found recently would be Malcolm Turnbull's response to the Manchester bombings earlier this year (video link here). Turnbull's language was very formal and highly standard, as was appropriate for such a serious speech.

Hope these answers help  ;D ;D

Amazing and clear answer. Thanks so much :D :D :D
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: mtDNA on October 18, 2017, 10:24:47 pm
Just a quick question:

With respect to the non-metalanguage based AC structure, what would you exactly base your paragraphs on?

For my AC SAC, we got a persuasive text, whereby the function was quite distinct from the social purpose, so I was able to do a Function/Social Purpose/Register structure. However, I’ve found that some texts lack that ulterior motive, particularly if it’s just a plain conversation. In such a situation where the function is essentially the social purpose, what structure could you use?

Thanks in advance!
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: EulerFan102 on October 18, 2017, 10:37:07 pm
Just a quick question:

With respect to the non-metalanguage based AC structure, what would you exactly base your paragraphs on?

For my AC SAC, we got a persuasive text, whereby the function was quite distinct from the social purpose, so I was able to do a Function/Social Purpose/Register structure. However, I’ve found that some texts lack that ulterior motive, particularly if it’s just a plain conversation. In such a situation where the function is essentially the social purpose, what structure could you use?

Thanks in advance!

Hey mtDNA,

I always structured my essay with the method you're mentioning, and personally I think it's the best way to do it. The base for each paragraphs depends a lot on the particular text, but I often chose from function/social purpose/register/relationship between participants. One of the sample ACs from the 2015 exam (p5-6, link here) is a nice example of an AC featuring paragraphs on all four.

I think that this is a great way to structure, no matter what the text is. You'll always be able to differentiate the function from the social purpose, even for a "plain conversation". For instance, the previous AC I mentioned is about a conversation where the function is to tell a funny story and the social purpose is to build rapport.
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: elaine18 on October 29, 2017, 07:34:13 pm
Hello. I am seriously struggling with English language. Could someone please give me advice on how I could study for section a, the analytical commentary and the essay?
 The only essay I feel comfortable with writing on is on individual identity... I haven't been able to write another essay on other topics such as informal vs formal....as I don't feel comfortable with them, plus I can't think of what to write. I'm worried about not getting a decent score on the exam , I really want to get at least 30+ for eng Lang.

could someone please explain to me the difference between positive and negative face needs, colloquialism vs slang, the difference between function and social purpose, and what is 'contextual factors' .

How should I structure an analytical commentary?
What is the best way for me to consolidate the meta language for English language?

Thank you 😊
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Bri MT on October 30, 2017, 07:44:25 am
Hello. I am seriously struggling with English language. Could someone please give me advice on how I could study for section a, the analytical commentary and the essay?
 The only essay I feel comfortable with writing on is on individual identity... I haven't been able to write another essay on other topics such as informal vs formal....as I don't feel comfortable with them, plus I can't think of what to write. I'm worried about not getting a decent score on the exam , I really want to get at least 30+ for eng Lang.

could someone please explain to me the difference between positive and negative face needs, colloquialism vs slang, the difference between function and social purpose, and what is 'contextual factors' .

How should I structure an analytical commentary?
What is the best way for me to consolidate the meta language for English language?

Thank you 😊
Positive face needs: desire to be liked & respected
Negative face needs: desire to be able to speak freely without imposition
Function: this is generally more obvious, and is the "basic level" eg. To inform, to entertain, to persuade,
Social purpose: this is generally more hidden, and is "deeper" eg "to promote positive perception of ____",
So for instance, a meme may have the function to entertain and a social purpose of building rapport
The level crossing removal ads have a function of informing, and a social purpose of portraying the government as making good decisions and improving Victoria

Contextual factors: These are influences from our environment that affect language use
Eg.
-Where are you? The same person would talk different at the MCG, school, home & parliament (likewise for different places on the Internet)
-What's happened/happening? A crisis and celebration demand different communication

How you structure an analytical commentary will depend on the text, but generally: intro, BP1, BP 2, BP 3
Examples of body paragraph topics  include: function & social purpose, social purpose, coherence & cohesion, prosodics, lexicology, register,

At this point, I would use Quizlet or something similar to memorise metalanguage
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: exit on October 30, 2017, 05:26:00 pm
Does anyone have any examples of where dysphemisms or taboo language is a good thing? (preferably recent) Preferably pm me it because my teacher specifically saud  not to use examples on atarnotes lul :/ but you can post here if you want
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: eru on November 06, 2017, 10:34:36 am
Hey guys, I have a few questions:
1. How can I add depth to my essays without writing more? I'm struggling to finish the exam on time so I can't afford to write more but I still want to write a high quality essay. Any advice?
2. My ACs get really repetitive and boring to write after a while. If it the text is informal it'll just be like 'Feature X contributes to the text's informality. Feature Y also lowers the register. A lowered register helps the author to establish themselves as relatable and friendly, and thus they can maintain the audience's interest'. Is there any way I can make it more interesting/specific? What do examiners like to see?
3. Is it possible to do well even though you've made up some examples? I'm pretty nervous about not having relevant examples for the essay.
Thanks!
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: ameeria1002 on November 06, 2017, 05:22:01 pm
Hey everyone,
I am a bit stressing out since I just saw a company practice exam that has 2 texts for section b (the analytical commentary!)
I haven't seen this ever in the VCAA papers but I am a bit nervous if it comes up this year
Does anyone know if it could?? Because I have no idea how to write a AC comparing 2 texts
Thank you!
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: EulerFan102 on November 06, 2017, 06:22:41 pm
Hey guys, I have a few questions:
1. How can I add depth to my essays without writing more? I'm struggling to finish the exam on time so I can't afford to write more but I still want to write a high quality essay. Any advice?
2. My ACs get really repetitive and boring to write after a while. If it the text is informal it'll just be like 'Feature X contributes to the text's informality. Feature Y also lowers the register. A lowered register helps the author to establish themselves as relatable and friendly, and thus they can maintain the audience's interest'. Is there any way I can make it more interesting/specific? What do examiners like to see?
3. Is it possible to do well even though you've made up some examples? I'm pretty nervous about not having relevant examples for the essay.
Thanks!

Hey, great questions btw! Here are my thoughts on them ;D

1. A great way to add depth to essays is to find conflicts or complexities within the topic. Can you think a contrasting example? Can you challenge the essay topic in a particular way? Here's an example: imagine the essay topic was simply "Language reflects the context." A more straight-forward essay may talk only about how different contextual factors influence a text. So how do you talk about complexities and conflicts? Well, how do multiple contextual factors interact and influence language? What if there are conflicting contextual factors? Can people go against the context and use language that doesn't quite 'fit'? (e.g. swear in a job interview, use slang in parliament) Why do people do this?
2. My answer is very similar to the previous one, really. Finding areas of conflict and complexities are always interesting to analyse, and will always add a whole lot of depth to ACs. Conflicting social purposes, a mixed register, conflicting functions, the power balance between interlocutors; all of these are really great to analyse in detail.
3. VCAA mentions every year how good it is to use contemporary Australian examples, and it's great for a whole range of reasons. That being said, there's no need to stress if you're struggling to find enough examples, because: a) there's still plenty of time before the exam, and so plenty of time to gather some more examples; b) your analysis and discussion is in many ways more important than the examples you use; and c) it's often hard to find 2017 Aussie examples for particular essay prompts, e.g. language change, internet language, as the changes and trends have not yet filtered up into the media where we tend to get all our examples, and I think VCAA recognises this difficulty.

Hope this helps, best of luck!  ;D
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: EulerFan102 on November 06, 2017, 06:33:46 pm
Hey everyone,
I am a bit stressing out since I just saw a company practice exam that has 2 texts for section b (the analytical commentary!)
I haven't seen this ever in the VCAA papers but I am a bit nervous if it comes up this year
Does anyone know if it could?? Because I have no idea how to write a AC comparing 2 texts
Thank you!

Hey there!
Technically it is possible. VCAA has specified that "Section B will consist of an analytical commentary on the language in one or more texts" (quote from here). Two texts for a short answer sections used to be fairly common with one of the older study designs, but it's something that I don't think has happened for a few years now. As such, I wouldn't stress too much about getting 2 texts for the AC, but it is possible.
An AC on 2 texts would probably differ somewhat from the standard. It would still be important to analyse each text's language and relate back to function/social purpose/register as is standard. However, for a 2-text AC it would be interesting to then discuss the similarities and differences in the texts' language, and relate this back to the differing functions/social purpose etc.
Hope this helps  ;D
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Alexicology on November 07, 2017, 12:57:07 pm
Hi guys,

For AC, can I structure my paragraphs using subsystems or do I have to structure them by register/social purpose/ context etc.?


Thanks,
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Bri MT on November 07, 2017, 01:11:10 pm
Hi guys,

For AC, can I structure my paragraphs using subsystems or do I have to structure them by register/social purpose/ context etc.?


Thanks,

Structure it in the best way for that text, there is no set structure that you HAVE to follow

Just make sure that when you discuss the meta-lang you relate to it to function social purpose etc
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Alexicology on November 07, 2017, 01:15:59 pm
Structure it in the best way for that text, there is no set structure that you HAVE to follow

Just make sure that when you discuss the meta-lang you relate to it to function social purpose etc


Thank you so much :)
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: jh;) on November 08, 2017, 11:21:47 am
For the AC, do you need to have a topic sentence at the start of each paragraph? Or can you just dive into it?
Also, if an example I'm analysing is repeated many times, do I just cite a few line references?
Thanks
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: ashlinholdsworth on November 08, 2017, 02:47:14 pm
What is included in information flow under discourse (contributing to text's cohesion)??? :D
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: ameeria1002 on November 08, 2017, 07:51:28 pm
Hi everyone!
I was just wondering that score for the exam do I need to get in order to achieve a raw study score of 35??
My sac marks for Unit 3 and 4 is 87%
Sorry, I am just stressing a bit as it is a prerequisite and I am not really good under exam conditions as much :(
Thank you!
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: ameeria1002 on November 08, 2017, 07:55:58 pm
Hey there!
Technically it is possible. VCAA has specified that "Section B will consist of an analytical commentary on the language in one or more texts" (quote from here). Two texts for a short answer sections used to be fairly common with one of the older study designs, but it's something that I don't think has happened for a few years now. As such, I wouldn't stress too much about getting 2 texts for the AC, but it is possible.
An AC on 2 texts would probably differ somewhat from the standard. It would still be important to analyse each text's language and relate back to function/social purpose/register as is standard. However, for a 2-text AC it would be interesting to then discuss the similarities and differences in the texts' language, and relate this back to the differing functions/social purpose etc.
Hope this helps  ;D
Thank you for your help!! I really hope it doesn't come up, but at least now I kinda know how to do it :)
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: QueenSmarty on November 10, 2017, 02:27:22 pm
What's a good length for an essay in the exam? Is 700 words too much or is that considered the norm?
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: EulerFan102 on November 10, 2017, 04:38:47 pm
For the AC, do you need to have a topic sentence at the start of each paragraph? Or can you just dive into it?
VCAA does not specify whether or not you need to have topic sentences. Personally, I'm a big fan of the topic sentence and think they're great to have in ACs. Also, the sample high-scoring ACs from the examination reports tend to have topic sentences, so they are probably worthwhile including.

Also, if an example I'm analysing is repeated many times, do I just cite a few line references?
Yeah, I'd just cite a few line numbers. No point wasting time with an extensive list that doesn't add much.
What is included in information flow under discourse (contributing to text's cohesion)??? :D
In the Study Design (link here), VCAA lists: "information flow including clefting, front focus and end focus"

What's a good length for an essay in the exam? Is 700 words too much or is that considered the norm?
I wouldn't say that's too much. VCAA sample high-scoring essays tend to be anywhere from 600 to 1000 words, so 700 words is comfortably within that ballpark. And of course, the quality of your essay is more important that its precise length.
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: QueenSmarty on November 11, 2017, 02:02:03 pm
Is it likely that we'll be given an extract from a short story to write an analytical commentary about? There doesn't seem to be much to write about for File 5 (A Double Buggy at Lahey's Creek) from the Lingofile workbook.
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: syubi on November 11, 2017, 11:12:43 pm
Is it likely that we'll be given an extract from a short story to write an analytical commentary about? There doesn't seem to be much to write about for File 5 (A Double Buggy at Lahey's Creek) from the Lingofile workbook.

Short stories are unlikely for Section B's (never seen them in a practice exam before), but you never know? I have seen some practice exams with short stories to analyse for Section A though.
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: QueenSmarty on November 14, 2017, 03:50:48 pm
Thanks syubi!

Any predictions for Thursday's essay topics?

I'm guessing there'll be one on taboo and swearing, positive and negative face needs, and how social changes have shaped Australian English. However, knowing the relative difficulty of the exams so far this year, I have a feeling the essay topics are going to be really specific and hard to write about. 
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: ameeria1002 on November 14, 2017, 06:29:07 pm
Hey everyone!
I am really nervous for the exam since my biggest issue (my teacher told me) is not being able to understand what the essay topic is asking of me and going off topic...Another issue of mine is that my clarity is not that great, English is my 2nd language :(
So does anyone please have any helpful tips for Thursday?
I would deeply appreciate the help! I really need to go well in this exam :(


Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: hk9191 on November 15, 2017, 01:32:28 am
are we allowed to use stimulus from other essay topics as quotes without being penalised?
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: cookiedream on November 15, 2017, 08:58:27 am
are we allowed to use stimulus from other essay topics as quotes without being penalised?

Yeah! I definitely do this sometimes and it's pretty sneaky ahaha
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: 1tonsmann1 on November 15, 2017, 01:24:45 pm
Hi does anyone know if it is essential to include linguist quotes? Will they penalise you if you do not include any?
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Bri MT on November 15, 2017, 01:49:25 pm
Hi does anyone know if it is essential to include linguist quotes? Will they penalise you if you do not include any?

I believe that to be high-scoring you need both quotes and examples 
(However I'm open to being corrected)
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Ahmad_A_1999 on November 15, 2017, 06:10:16 pm
Hey guys,

Does anyone have any sort of idea what grade II should be aiming for on the exam tomorrow to get a raw of 30, I'm really desperate and screwed for Section C :'(
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: exit on November 16, 2017, 10:51:22 pm
It's a bit late to say this but you definitely do not need linguist quotes to full mark an essay. It's not on the criteria unlike contemporary examples. I personally did not include linguist quotes because my essays were already long enough. However, linguist quotes definitely do add weight to your arguments in my opinion.
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on January 12, 2018, 11:43:41 am
Hi everyone,

Could I just ask, can we use contemporary examples from the American Context, obviously not for the essay topics that ask for the Australian context and identity, but what about for topics relating to swearing or taboo?
For example, could I talk about Trump swearing in a recent tweet or any media release?

Or does every single example have to be Australian?

Thanks a lot guys! :)
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: mtDNA on January 12, 2018, 12:47:08 pm
Hi everyone,

Could I just ask, can we use contemporary examples from the American Context, obviously not for the essay topics that ask for the Australian context and identity, but what about for topics relating to swearing or taboo?
For example, could I talk about Trump swearing in a recent tweet or any media release?

Or does every single example have to be Australian?

Thanks a lot guys! :)


Well if it says anywhere in the prompt, “in the contemporary Australian context”, then all your examples should be contemporary Australian examples, regardless of the essay topic. However, in some cases it can be quite challenging to find Australian examples, such as when you’re discussing teenspeak, which isn’t really confined to a nation as such. Therefore to weave around this issue, I just used a linguistic convention in an Australian context (e.g. ‘Clive Palmer is one thicc bih’ vs just stating ’thicc’ as your example).

Now, in the situation you have posted, the Trump thing wouldn’t work, and consequently would culminate in the loss of marks. So in this scenario, you simply need to find another (contemporary Australian) example, especially because it’s not too challenging to find one for swearing since dysphemistic language is quite prominent within Australian English. For example, the 'F*uck Fred Nile case’ or ‘CUintheNT’ are pretty good ones, but I think they’re a bit dated for you to use, so something similar which is more recent would work.

Hope this helps!  ;D
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: cookiedream on January 12, 2018, 12:54:33 pm
Hi everyone,

Could I just ask, can we use contemporary examples from the American Context, obviously not for the essay topics that ask for the Australian context and identity, but what about for topics relating to swearing or taboo?
For example, could I talk about Trump swearing in a recent tweet or any media release?

Or does every single example have to be Australian?

Thanks a lot guys! :)


Hello!

The best way to use these examples is when comparing them to usage in Australian English related to similar contexts. So for taboo, while American English has this, Australian English has this, or supports this, or has this idea. Remember, essay topics commonly ask you to write using 'contemporary Australian examples' or they imply it in the question stem through phrasings like 'In Australia today'. Although, if you see that your chosen question doesn't imply this, then I think it's safe to use relevant American English examples (maybe just avoid using them predominantly - Aus. examples are always the best).

For our school, it was highly recommended to stick to Australian examples, although many of those who scored highly got away with using American examples. It might be different for your school, so ask your teacher to confirm this.

Also, just like mtDNA, I often used linguistic examples with reference to the Australian context, even if their origins are in America. For example, an Australian Youtuber using a certain slang term or an Australian instagram account incorporating such and such.
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on January 12, 2018, 02:39:12 pm
Thanks a lot mtDNA and cookiedream ! :)
You've made it clear for me now! :)
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: peter.g15 on January 27, 2018, 05:07:17 pm
Hi guys!
Just wondering on how to properly structure/group together the body paragraphs for an analytical commentary. I'm not sure on the whole 'topic' for the whole body paragraph and what is appropriate to talk about. For example, is it okay to have a body paragraphs on the following points: spontaneity of the conversation, register of the conversation and then the relationship between interlocuters?

Thanks!
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: AngelWings on January 27, 2018, 05:55:49 pm
Hi guys!
Just wondering on how to properly structure/group together the body paragraphs for an analytical commentary. I'm not sure on the whole 'topic' for the whole body paragraph and what is appropriate to talk about. For example, is it okay to have a body paragraphs on the following points: spontaneity of the conversation, register of the conversation and then the relationship between interlocuters?

Thanks!
You will find that you will write essays your way in English Language. I suppose if you can find enough to discuss in the article in a quick amount of time, that is entirely possible. I used to go via the subsystems instead though, as that works for both written and spoken texts.
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: peter.g15 on January 27, 2018, 11:30:55 pm
You will find that you will write essays your way in English Language. I suppose if you can find enough to discuss in the article in a quick amount of time, that is entirely possible. I used to go via the subsystems instead though, as that works for both written and spoken texts.

Okay! Thanks :)
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: exit on January 28, 2018, 12:13:13 am
Okay! Thanks :)

I personally found it easier to have my paragraphs:

1. Function/social purpose
2. Register
3. Discourse features (turn taking/topic management mainly for spoken and coherence/cohesion for written). This works really well in my opinion as you dont have to think about what subsystems to write about. Also, if you pick a subsystem and can’t find enough features to analyse, it’s kind of ugly.
 I found my paragraph structure worked really well for both me and the people who used it. Super broad and customisable yet very specific and detailed.
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: tinkerbell101 on February 01, 2018, 12:01:53 pm
hey what is the difference between semantic field and domain?
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on February 01, 2018, 02:10:09 pm
hey what is the difference between semantic field and domain?
These are really really similar if not to a certain extent quite same!
But the major difference is that "semantic field" includes a series of words relating to a certain topic.
Whereas, the domain is just the one-worded topic. So you can say the range of words are a subset of the domain.

The definition of semantic field:
an area of meaning that is identified by a set of related lexical items; e.g. claret, rose, sangiovese, riesling, and so on are part fo the semantic field of wine.

The definition of domain:
a sphere of activity, concern, interest or field; for e.g. home, work, school, the law and government are all domains.

Do you see the parallels?

Hope this helps! :)

Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: TheAspiringDoc on February 09, 2018, 04:50:12 pm
/həˈləʊ̯/,

I am trying to make a flowchart/mindmap of all the areas of study and big ideas in English Language to show how they relate to each other. I was wondering if someone could give me some advice for what I should include?

So far I've got:
Social purpose + context + register --> language choice --> addresses many needs (face needs, PC, coherence/cohesion) + language innovation and varieties (neologisms, SAE)
I'm also trying to include all the conversational strategies (floor, turn-taking, minimal responses ...)

Any ideas?
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Bri MT on February 09, 2018, 04:59:10 pm
/həˈləʊ̯/,

I am trying to make a flowchart/mindmap of all the areas of study and big ideas in English Language to show how they relate to each other. I was wondering if someone could give me some advice for what I should include?

So far I've got:
Social purpose + context + register --> language choice --> addresses many needs (face needs, PC, coherence/cohesion) + language innovation and varieties (neologisms, SAE)
I'm also trying to include all the conversational strategies (floor, turn-taking, minimal responses ...)

Any ideas?

identity, culture, domain, medium, mode etc.  could all also work well :)
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: TheAspiringDoc on February 09, 2018, 05:04:55 pm
identity, culture, domain, medium, mode etc.  could all also work well :)
I've mainly put those things under headings that I previously mentioned. E.g. I put mode under context,   and identity under the list of things (identity, face needs) that language choice can address.
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Bri MT on February 09, 2018, 05:44:03 pm
I've mainly put those things under headings that I previously mentioned. E.g. I put mode under context,   and identity under the list of things (identity, face needs) that language choice can address.

Ah, ok. Are you including things like para linguistic features? Do you want to address unintended impacts? Language change?
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: TheAspiringDoc on February 09, 2018, 06:14:38 pm
Ah, ok. Are you including things like para linguistic features? Do you want to address unintended impacts? Language change?
Yeah I'd basically just like to cover the whole course's main ideas. Specifically, I'd like to show the main inputs into a discourse (the input factors of context, social purpose, register, relationship structure etc that are prior factors), then show the actual elements of the discourse (e.g. Whether active or passive voice is used, politeness conventions, or what types of semantic patterning are used) and then show the flow-on effect to its effects on society and individuals identity etc .

I've drawn it out (vaguely) but I still don't know how to easily upload a photo to AN xD
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: Bri MT on February 09, 2018, 06:17:42 pm
Yeah I'd basically just like to cover the whole course's main ideas. Specifically, I'd like to show the main inputs into a discourse (the input factors of context, social purpose, register, relationship structure etc that are prior factors), then show the actual elements of the discourse (e.g. Whether active or passive voice is used, politeness conventions, or what types of semantic patterning are used) and then show the flow-on effect to its effects on society and individuals identity etc .

I've drawn it out (vaguely) but I still don't know how to easily upload a photo to AN xD

You can use a photo sharing site, or click reply > attachments and other options > choose file 

I think the easiest way for you to cover everything is to read through the study design and tick or cross off all the metalanguage/key ideas you come across
Title: Re: English Language Question Thread
Post by: TheAspiringDoc on February 09, 2018, 06:44:44 pm
Here it is (thanks miniturtle for photo help!)
I'm mainly wanting feedback on what the the big headings (context, conversational strategies etc) should be and how I should organise the poster
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: TheAspiringDoc on February 18, 2018, 11:46:49 am
Hypothetically, if I was to make notes on only 10 concepts in English language, what would be the most important? For example:
-spoken vs written vs e-communication (I know it's no longer considered a straightforward dichotomy, but still)
-formal vs informal spectrum
-features of political speech
-lexical patterning
-connected speech processes
-cohesion/coherence
-etc etc..

What would you say are the most worthwhile ~10 topics?
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: cookiedream on February 18, 2018, 12:25:50 pm
Hypothetically, if I was to make notes on only 10 concepts in English language, what would be the most important? For example:
-spoken vs written vs e-communication (I know it's no longer considered a straightforward dichotomy, but still)
-formal vs informal spectrum
-features of political speech
-lexical patterning
-connected speech processes
-cohesion/coherence
-etc etc..

What would you say are the most worthwhile ~10 topics?


Hello!

Hmmm, perhaps the most prevalent concepts I've seen are:
- political correctness/euphemisms/doublespeak
- individual + group identity (connection with ethnolects, Aboriginal English, teenspeak)
- gender identity/generational identity, etc.
- modes of communication + overlaps
- patterning (like literally all the patterning: phonological, morphological, lexical, semantic, syntactic)
- cohesion
- coherence
- formality/informality/mixed register
- SAE/non-SAE
- Australian English/identity

Might have missed some topics though, since that's what I can think of off the top of my head.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on February 19, 2018, 10:02:49 pm
Hello everyone :)

1. Could someone please explain what antithesis and parallelism are? And provide examples so we can understand them better?
Just confused how to spot them and how to explain what syntactic features contribute to antithesis and parallelism.

2. Also, what is included in lexical patterning?
(does it just mean semantic patterning?) and then that'll include metaphor, irony, parody, etc?

Thanks guys! :)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: TheAspiringDoc on February 19, 2018, 10:16:12 pm
^^
Spoiler
Hey,

So syntactic patterning is basically deliberately ordering a sentence in a certain sequence so for a given purpose (e.g. For coherent/cohesive syntax or to memorably highlight the most important elements of the sentence).

The three types as per the study design are:
Antithesis: using syntactical structure to show contrasts (write quickly and you will never write well, but write well and you will soon write quickly)
Listing: can use dot points or commas (I study methods, spec, Lang, and chem)
Parallelism: repeating similar clauses or phrases to emphasise a theme (see Churchill's speech, we shall fight on the beaches)
Just to add on:

Lexical patterning is essentially the repetition of lexemes throughout a text, with simple lexical patterning being the repetition of the same word, whilst complex lexical patterning is the repetition of the same word with different derivational/inflectional morphemes attached. As already mentioned, this may be used to emphasise a certain point (the interlocutor’s social purpose may be linked here), as well as to bolster the cohesive nature of the text (by creating semantic links between sentences). Just note that this differs to morphological patterning - examples include ‘mishy mashy’ and ‘He studies philosophy, geography, and sociology'.

With lexical choice (i.e. word choice), this can be important, say, if the writer/reader wants to increase the entertainment value of his/her piece, or add a sense of flair to the text - this is commonly done with hyperbole. There are plenty of other implications of lexical choice; you will mainly discuss these in the AC. And with syntactic patterning, you will almost certainly refer to the three in your AC since they are usually easy to find and good to talk about with reference to the social purpose of a text.
I don't think lexical patterning = semantic patterning
What is a stylistic feature?
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on February 19, 2018, 10:45:03 pm
^^
Spoiler
I don't think lexical patterning = semantic patterning
What is a stylistic feature?
Thanks so much, TheAspiringDoc! :)
Yeah, you see we need to identify all this for our SA SAC. So we'll probably get like an informal conversation transcript and then asked something along the lines of:
"How is *something* reflected in the lexical and syntactic patterning of the text (transcript)?"
That's why it's hard to find this in conversation (discourse) than it is in an AC text.

According to the study design, it says:
"stylistic features in informal speech and writing, including phonological patterning, syntactic patterning, morphological patterning, and lexical choice and semantic patterning." (this is too broad though!!)

I'm trying to practice for this, but would love to hear other tips or examples of how to find parallelism and antithesis in convo (and also lexical patterning! :))

Thank you!! :)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on February 24, 2018, 10:44:36 am
Hi EngLangers! :)

I have my Eng Lang SAC coming up this week, so would really appreciate some help!

Just wanted to ask whether conversion of word class and creative word formations are always features of an informal register?
For example, on one line, a text says "It's not your fault Game Changers" and then on the next line, the text said "Keep on changing the game."
Now this is obviously conversion of word class from noun Changers to verb 'changing.'
but then if I had to answer how this conversion of word class contributes to the register of the text, would I say that it contributes to the formality or informality?
I was really confused because the whole text is highly informal !! But at the same time, the verb 'changing' doesn't sound that informal. So what register should I write?

And what would be the main takeaway? It a text uses creative word formations and conversion of word class, is it always going to represent informality (despite being quite standard) or will it then show formality (when it's standard conversion like what's happend with 'changers' here) ?

Thanks so much guys !! :)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MathsQuestIsBad on February 27, 2018, 08:50:33 pm
Hi EngLangers! :)

I have my Eng Lang SAC coming up this week, so would really appreciate some help!

Just wanted to ask whether conversion of word class and creative word formations are always features of an informal register?
For example, on one line, a text says "It's not your fault Game Changers" and then on the next line, the text said "Keep on changing the game."
Now this is obviously conversion of word class from noun Changers to verb 'changing.'
but then if I had to answer how this conversion of word class contributes to the register of the text, would I say that it contributes to the formality or informality?
I was really confused because the whole text is highly informal !! But at the same time, the verb 'changing' doesn't sound that informal. So what register should I write?

And what would be the main takeaway? It a text uses creative word formations and conversion of word class, is it always going to represent informality (despite being quite standard) or will it then show formality (when it's standard conversion like what's happend with 'changers' here) ?

Thanks so much guys !! :)

Hi to my literal next door neighbour,

No, conversion of word class or creative word formations are not strictly features of informal register. Firstly, addressing the conversion of noun to verb 'changers to changing' would not contribute to register imo because both are used perfectly well in formal situations e.g. in TEDtalk. However, if it's asking specifically for how 'changers' to 'changing' contributes to register you can look at it syntactically. I think that the way it's addressing the audience as plural noun 'changers' in the first clause sort of elevates their relative power and status, and the verb 'changing' implies that as changers this is their job to continue. We can also extrapolate that to "keep on changing the game" implies positive change and this sort of structure makes me think it's adding to a more formal register. Although I don't know the situational context, it sounds like a presentation because of the plural noun, so I think that immediately implies a colder social distance.

Also back to creative word formations, the reason why I don't think it's only a feature of informal register is because creative word formations and creation of neologisms helps keep language adaptable to society. For example, coinages like 'email' is a blending of 'electronic mail' and we use 'email' for the sake of convenience even in formal situations. Hope that helped, neighbour! :D
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on February 28, 2018, 05:31:04 pm
Hi to my literal next door neighbour,

No, conversion of word class or creative word formations are not strictly features of informal register. Firstly, addressing the conversion of noun to verb 'changers to changing' would not contribute to register imo because both are used perfectly well in formal situations e.g. in TEDtalk. However, if it's asking specifically for how 'changers' to 'changing' contributes to register you can look at it syntactically. I think that the way it's addressing the audience as plural noun 'changers' in the first clause sort of elevates their relative power and status, and the verb 'changing' implies that as changers this is their job to continue. We can also extrapolate that to "keep on changing the game" implies positive change and this sort of structure makes me think it's adding to a more formal register. Although I don't know the situational context, it sounds like a presentation because of the plural noun, so I think that immediately implies a colder social distance.

Also back to creative word formations, the reason why I don't think it's only a feature of informal register is because creative word formations and creation of neologisms helps keep language adaptable to society. For example, coinages like 'email' is a blending of 'electronic mail' and we use 'email' for the sake of convenience even in formal situations. Hope that helped, neighbour! :D
Thanks so much, neighbour!!  ;D ;D

Definitely makes sense!

Would love to hear more thoughts or interpretations from others of my question!
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Joseph41 on March 01, 2018, 12:21:25 pm
Hi EngLangers! :)

I have my Eng Lang SAC coming up this week, so would really appreciate some help!

Just wanted to ask whether conversion of word class and creative word formations are always features of an informal register?
For example, on one line, a text says "It's not your fault Game Changers" and then on the next line, the text said "Keep on changing the game."
Now this is obviously conversion of word class from noun Changers to verb 'changing.'
but then if I had to answer how this conversion of word class contributes to the register of the text, would I say that it contributes to the formality or informality?
I was really confused because the whole text is highly informal !! But at the same time, the verb 'changing' doesn't sound that informal. So what register should I write?

And what would be the main takeaway? It a text uses creative word formations and conversion of word class, is it always going to represent informality (despite being quite standard) or will it then show formality (when it's standard conversion like what's happend with 'changers' here) ?

Thanks so much guys !! :)


Hard to comment without seeing the full text IMO, but a general response from my perspective:

I don't think word class conversation necessarily constitutes informal language, no. My initial thought was something like the lexeme action. I don't know its etymology, but I would guess it started its life as a noun. Recently, however, it's been used as a verb, as in, "I will action that task". I even hear it around the ATAR Notes office quite often!

To me, that's not informal language - in fact, it seems quite formal to me (perhaps an example of bureaucratese?). This is obviously a very small sample size, but no, I don't think conversion always renders the text informal.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on March 01, 2018, 02:33:40 pm
Thanks so much Joseph41 !! ^^^

Just a couple of small questions,
1. What are examples of lexical patterning?
(other than repetition?)

2. Say a host is interviewing an Olympic champion, talking about her achievements and challenges, would one of the social purposes be supporting in group membership (of tv viewers who are interested in sports or particularly the Olympics?)
and especially when the sporting jargon is not known or understood by everyone?

Thanks everyone! :)
I have my SAC tomorrow, so would really appreciate some help! :)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: -_-zzz on March 02, 2018, 07:52:07 pm
Does anyone know what some features of a formal register are? And how do they show that the register is formal?

Cheers
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on March 02, 2018, 09:47:10 pm
Does anyone know what some features of a formal register are? And how do they show that the register is formal?

Cheers
This is straight from the Study Design, so I'm basically just copy-pasting!! :)

Students understand that formal language, in all modes, tends to be less ambiguous, more cohesive, and is more likely to make explicit aspects of the presumed context. They examine formal texts, exploring how writers and speakers are more likely to consider how their audience might interpret their message, packaging it appropriately with attention to the art of rhetoric, including the use of figurative language. Students learn that formal written texts are more likely to have been edited while formal spoken texts may have been rehearsed. They examine such formal written texts as legal documents, bureaucratic policy and procedures, official documents, informational prose, and literature. They also examine formal language in spoken texts such as speeches, lectures, oaths, liturgies, performances, and monologues. Formal speech has many of the organisational and stylistic features of written language, but also draws on paralinguistic features such as gesture and eye contact and prosodic cues such as pitch, stress and intonation. Students investigate the range of ways formal language can be used to perform various social purposes. They investigate how formal language can be used to meet and challenge others’ face needs, both positive and negative. Formal language choices, particularly politeness strategies, can also reinforce social distance and relationship hierarchies, or build rapport. Similarly, varieties such as jargon can reinforce the user’s authority and expertise or promote in-group solidarity. Students examine texts in which speakers and writers use formal language to celebrate and commemorate, and they explore how formal language can be used to clarify, manipulate or obfuscate, particularly in public language – the language of politics, media, the law and bureaucracy. Students learn that formal language enables users to carefully negotiate social taboos through the employment of euphemisms, non-discriminatory language, and political correctness. They explore how variations in style reveal much about the intentions and values of speakers or writers, as well as the situational and social contexts in which formal texts are created.

• the use of formal language for various social purposes, including:
 – maintaining and challenging positive and negative face needs
 – reinforcing social distance and authority
 – establishing expertise
 – promoting social harmony, negotiating social taboos and building rapport
 – clarifying, manipulating or obfuscating

This just shows how the Study Design's your best friend! :)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: TheAspiringDoc on March 03, 2018, 02:08:22 pm
Does mispronouncing someone's name affront their positive or negative face needs? I'm quite confused because my teacher's definition doesn't really fit with the study design definition ..  ???
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on March 03, 2018, 02:42:23 pm
Does mispronouncing someone's name affront their positive or negative face needs? I'm quite confused because my teacher's definition doesn't really fit with the study design definition ..  ???
I'd say it's threatening positive face. Because you want everyone to know you as a person, you know, preferably with correct pronunciation of your name!
I thought of this because using vocatives affirms positive face, so mispronouncing the vocative (this would mean that there's basically the lack of that vocative, just because it's not perfect anymore), would be threatening positive face.
Would that be a fair interpretation?
Such a good question though!! :)
Thank you!!
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on March 12, 2018, 09:55:32 pm
Hi everyone!

Could I just ask, what would you write under 'conventions'? (conventions that contribute to a text's coherence). All of this is if I'm writing an analytical commentary analysing an informal text.

and then what's the difference between conventions and formatting?

Also, what are the most common types of texts that you could get for informal AC?
Other than article, blog, website page, a long invitation?
Would you get a messaging or online chat record? Or would that classify as discourse hence not being appropriate for an AC?

Thanks so much for helping me out guys!! :)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Mr West on March 15, 2018, 05:13:34 pm
Hey everyone,

*this is 1/2 related*

can anyone explain the types of phrases (noun, verb etc) and how to identify them in a sentence

Thanks :)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: DBA-144 on March 15, 2018, 10:02:08 pm
Hey everyone,

*this is 1/2 related*

can anyone explain the types of phrases (noun, verb etc) and how to identify them in a sentence

Thanks :)
 

Not good at this buuuut here goes

In a sentence we have a noun, verb, advejtive, adverb, preposition, conjunction and i think that is it.

Noun is a thing, like table, leg and it can be abstract, like love or hate.
Verb is doing word, like catching, etc. Mostly end in ing.
Pretty sure that all sentences have 1 of these.
Adjective describes something, it describes a  noun, like big, large, tall, etc.
Adverbs describe verbs, like he ran QUICKLY or he speaks SLOWLY.
Conjunctions are joining words, like and, because.
Eg. Consider these 2 sentences. I  played soccer. I am tired. i played for too long.
You can combine these like this.

I am tired BECAUSE i played soccer for too long.

Preposition is position word, like up left right, etc.

Sorry if my explanations are poor, but i dont actually do eng lang  :-\

Hope this helped tho. ;D
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Joseph41 on March 16, 2018, 11:25:21 am
Hey everyone,

*this is 1/2 related*

can anyone explain the types of phrases (noun, verb etc) and how to identify them in a sentence

Thanks :)

So, this is related to the subsystem of syntax - basically, the ways in which we arrange words and phrases to make sentences that make sense.

On a basic level, a "phrase" is a unit of several words that act together in a sentence. But importantly, they're not really sentences on their own - that is, they can't act independently. For example, take the noun phrase, "the man with the funny hat". This is a complete linguistic unit, but it's certainly not a sentence (a sentence has certain characteristics, which aren't satisfied by this noun phrase alone).

There are lots of different types of phrases in English. You might be familiar with word classes/parts of speech, such as nouns, verbs, adjectives and so on. There are usually equivalent phrase types for each of these parts of speech. For example, a noun phrase, a verb phrase, and adjective phrase and so on.

A quick example of a couple of the more common phrase types:

Noun phrase:
"the old and very wrinkled grandmother"

Verb phrase:
"was running"

Quote
My advice for parsing (breaking down a text into its different sections, such as phrases), is to look for the head of the phrase. For example, in that noun phrase above, grandmother is the noun. Everything else ("the old and very wrinkled") is just modifying that noun, so it collectively forms a noun phrase.

I'm not very good with syntax - it's one of my least preferred subsystems. But I think good practice would be taking a slab of text, such as the one I've included below. Try to highlight, say, all of the noun phrases initially. You can do it in this thread, and then we can discuss if you have any questions or anything is unclear. :)

We asked a random selection of our tutors one simple question: “What’s your best VCE advice?” We wanted just one simple piece of advice each – just to get to the good stuff. This is part one of what they said! This is our second instalment of the VCE megaguide. You can read Part 1 here.

VCE MegaGuide | Tutor #1
Shifting from passive note taking techniques to more active processes definitely improved my understanding and my grades.

“It would have to be saving time whilst studying. That means studying smarter – not necessarily longer. It’s easy to fall into the trap of passively copying out slabs of information from your textbook, websites, and notes from your teacher – I know this because I used to do it. And although it may feel like you’re hard at work (your hand is sore, you’ve spent an hour or two slouched over your textbook etc.), this is not very efficient at all. This isn’t to say note taking is bad. In fact, you should definitely be creating summaries for your subjects. But this should be an active process.

This means make your own diagrams, charts, tables. Use your own words – an easy way to ensure this is to not look at your resources the entire time that you are making your notes. I also find that writing out notes on topics, or sections of certain topics, that I already know about in great detail is a massive waste of time – I tend to use the note taking process as a way of trying to understand things that still don’t seem clear to me.

Lastly, you could also try creating your notes by making your own questions and then answering these questions in your own words. In my experience, shifting from passive note taking techniques to more active processes definitely improved my understanding and my grades, as well as saving me a great deal of time which is such a precious resource during VCE.”

From this article.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: forbiddensoulxx on March 18, 2018, 01:03:00 pm
Hey guys, just a quick question. What's the difference between the social purpose and the function of a text? Can they be overlapping or if not the same? What would some examples be if they are different?
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: EulerFan102 on March 19, 2018, 09:56:17 pm
Hey guys, just a quick question. What's the difference between the social purpose and the function of a text? Can they be overlapping or if not the same? What would some examples be if they are different?

Hey there, great questions!
So the function is what the author/speaker is directly trying to do with the text. They are creating the text and are doing so to fulfil this particular task. For instance, the function of the ABC News is to inform about the day's events, while the function of a stand-up comedian's routine is to entertain the audience. There are many other possible functions, such as persuading, honouring, commemorating, celebrating, instructing, gossiping and promising, to name a few.
On the other hand, social purpose is what the author/speaker is trying to do socially. Often (but not always) this is to do with decreasing or increasing social distance. For example, the stand-up comedian's routine is probably very informal, and so the social purposes may be to build rapport, encourage intimacy and support in-group membership. On the other hand, the ABC News broadcast is very formal, with possible social purposes of establishing expertise, reinforcing social distance and establishing credibility. VCAA kindly lists some of the common social purposes in the Study Design (link here, p.20-1), so definitely check that out.
I'd say that for the vast majority of texts you'll see, the function and social purpose will be different. I reckon it's pretty rare that they're exactly the same (and see the examples above for some examples of the function and social purpose being different).
Hope this helps  ;D
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on March 25, 2018, 11:10:16 am
Hi everyone! :)
Could I just ask,

1. When you are given an informal spoken text, do you analyse the discourse features as well? In this case do you have to talk about the cohesion and coherence strategies as well? Or can you just talk about one of them since you're going to talk about discourse features as well?

2. When you have multiple text types to analyse for an AC, (cartoons with text and then small comments relating to that issue), how do you structure your AC? Do you look at the collective social purposes of these texts? or any other way? I have no idea about this... do you have to talk about all the components in your intro?

3. How many words for an AC are realistically feasible in 60-65 mins? I do write pretty fast, but just if on the SAC day there's an utterly difficult text/s to write on, then I'd have to take into consideration the extra thinking time as well. But overall? any idea?
Also, how much would you be aiming to write for an AC in the exam? (AC in 40-45 mins?)

4. When writing about the context, can you say cohesion and coherence are used to ensure the text suits its situational and cultural context?
It's just that I write too much so I wanted to combine some things so I won't have to write two separate paras for coherence and cohesion and then context. That's just getting too many words right now so thought to combine. Can I do this?

Thanks guys! :)

Would love to read a response!!

Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: exit on April 02, 2018, 10:41:22 am
Hi everyone! :)
Could I just ask,

1. When you are given an informal spoken text, do you analyse the discourse features as well? In this case do you have to talk about the cohesion and coherence strategies as well? Or can you just talk about one of them since you're going to talk about discourse features as well?

2. When you have multiple text types to analyse for an AC, (cartoons with text and then small comments relating to that issue), how do you structure your AC? Do you look at the collective social purposes of these texts? or any other way? I have no idea about this... do you have to talk about all the components in your intro?

3. How many words for an AC are realistically feasible in 60-65 mins? I do write pretty fast, but just if on the SAC day there's an utterly difficult text/s to write on, then I'd have to take into consideration the extra thinking time as well. But overall? any idea?
Also, how much would you be aiming to write for an AC in the exam? (AC in 40-45 mins?)

4. When writing about the context, can you say cohesion and coherence are used to ensure the text suits its situational and cultural context?
It's just that I write too much so I wanted to combine some things so I won't have to write two separate paras for coherence and cohesion and then context. That's just getting too many words right now so thought to combine. Can I do this?

Thanks guys! :)

Would love to read a response!!



1. In an informal spoken text, you would normally be focusing on turn-taking and topic management (holding the floor etc.). Coherence and cohesion strategies are generally not intentionally employed in these scenarios unless it is slightly formal, therefore you do not need to talk about it.  However, if your intuition tells you to talk about it, then I guess why not?

2. Generally the functions/social purposes of different text types within a single AC differ. I usually have a paragraph on social purpose and another paragraph on formality. In the social purpose paragraph, I would probably talk about one text type towards the start and link it to the main purposes of the first text type, then move on to the other text type, and link my analysis to whatever purposes that second text type has. Similar things I might to for my formality paragraph. Of course, this could depend on what text types you have been presented with.]

3. Aim for at least 600 words in 40-45 mins in the exam but you might fit more. Under the exam adrenaline and stress, you might write faster than usual. In the SACs, honestly 60-65 mins to write 600 words is alright as long as your quality is up there. You can write more words but just make sure the quality of your analysis does not suffer because of it.

4. I combine cohesion and coherence in my ACs. I don't have a paragraph on situational and cultural context as, like you said, you can talk about it in your existing paragraphs such as cohesion and coherence.  What you said is fine ;)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on April 02, 2018, 05:17:03 pm
Hi all!

Just a question,
What's the difference between the deictic expression "there" and the adverbial "there"
Would you call "there" a deictic expression if it was only relevant to the context and if you wouldn't be able to understand it without knowing the context?
And then you'd call "there" an adverbial if it just sounds right? in plain english? without any need to understand context?

I'm thinking of an example (just if my difference sounds confusion),

"I saw her there."
Would you say the "there" is a deictic expression or an adverbial?

I think you'd need to know the context, as in where's the place that I'm talking about, etc, but then "there" is an adverbial of place as well...

How do you tell the difference?

Any examples would be awesome!! :)

Thanks a lot guys!
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: exit on April 03, 2018, 09:39:26 pm
Hi all!

Just a question,
What's the difference between the deictic expression "there" and the adverbial "there"
Would you call "there" a deictic expression if it was only relevant to the context and if you wouldn't be able to understand it without knowing the context?
And then you'd call "there" an adverbial if it just sounds right? in plain english? without any need to understand context?

I'm thinking of an example (just if my difference sounds confusion),

"I saw her there."
Would you say the "there" is a deictic expression or an adverbial?

I think you'd need to know the context, as in where's the place that I'm talking about, etc, but then "there" is an adverbial of place as well...

How do you tell the difference?

Any examples would be awesome!! :)

Thanks a lot guys!

A lot of words can have 2 terms to describe it and you can use either one... it just affects which paragraph it is in.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on April 03, 2018, 11:01:56 pm
Thanks a lot exit!
I just had another question:

If the writer of an informal text writes "WTF???!!!"
should I call this an abbreviation for the swear word?
Would this be non-standard capitalisation as well?

Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Bri MT on April 04, 2018, 04:16:56 pm
Thanks a lot exit!
I just had another question:

If the writer of an informal text writes "WTF???!!!"
should I call this an abbreviation for the swear word?
Would this be non-standard capitalisation as well?



it's an abbreviation for the entire phrase, not just the swear word. Writing swear words and other taboos when relevant is completely fine in the exam so I would just write out the full phrase unless this is something that you're uncomfortable with.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on April 04, 2018, 05:13:14 pm
it's an abbreviation for the entire phrase, not just the swear word. Writing swear words and other taboos when relevant is completely fine in the exam so I would just write out the full phrase unless this is something that you're uncomfortable with.
Thanks miniturtle!
So this is an informal feature, but could I also call it non-standard capitalisation?
Or is it that because the article this was in, was on an online blog (where it's accessible to anyone)? and so the writer chose to not swear?
Or does abbreviating the swearing phrase make it formal? although it's non-standard capitalisation of the interrogative "what the f**k?"
Thanks a lot! :)

Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Joseph41 on April 04, 2018, 05:23:27 pm
Thanks miniturtle!
So this is an informal feature, but could I also call it non-standard capitalisation?
Or is it that because the article this was in, was on an online blog (where it's accessible to anyone)? and so the writer chose to not swear?
Or does abbreviating the swearing phrase make it formal? although it's non-standard capitalisation of the interrogative "what the f**k?"
Thanks a lot! :)



In what sense would it be non-standard capitalisation?
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on April 04, 2018, 05:36:13 pm
In what sense would it be non-standard capitalisation?
Oh sorry I must be overthinking it then...
I just thought that it wasn't like the whole article was capitalised and so this abbreviation stands out like a sudden destruction of the norm.
Also, only the first letter of the first word has to be capitalised in Standard English in any sentence or question right?
But this is capitalising every first letter of every word in the original question "What the f***?
You don't write:
What The F***? in standard English. (unless you wanted to use this question as a heading of an opinion piece or something)
Sorry once again if I'm overthinking it!

What would you call "WTF???!!!" as?
- informal abbreviation
- non-standard capitalisation and punctuation (because there's two different punctuation symbols - question and exclamation mark- one after the other?
- a combination of these or
- something else?  ;D ;D

Thanks Joseph41! :)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on April 05, 2018, 10:35:30 am
Hi everyone!

I don't fully understand how end focus and front focus aid cohesion. Would someone please explain this?
For example, with end focus the reader/audience will focus on the new information if it's situated at the end. But how is this cohesive / how does it allow to make links between the text?

Thank you very much! :)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: exit on April 05, 2018, 10:53:32 am
Hi everyone!

I don't fully understand how end focus and front focus aid cohesion. Would someone please explain this?
For example, with end focus the reader/audience will focus on the new information if it's situated at the end. But how is this cohesive / how does it allow to make links between the text?

Thank you very much! :)


Front focus can aid cohesion by ensuring the most salient information is emphasised at the start of a sentence, making the meaning of the sentence more clear. End focus aids cohesion because generally it is easier to read a sentence that goes old information to new information rather than vice versa. Also, long phrases should be given end focus as a long phrase at the start of the sentence is confusing as the reader does not know the context of the long phrase (or maybe some other reason, dependent on text) This is just a guideline
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on April 10, 2018, 11:30:10 pm
Hi everyone!

It would be really great if someone could reply, because I have my AC SAC on the first day of term!

1. Could you please give some examples of consistency (coherence)?
Is it like using the same font, or only particular things are italicised in an article?
Also, for example if it was a blog post, can you say
"The logical ordering of comments below the blog post is consistent to the situational context of an online blog where commentators can reply to the main post at the end of the page."
Or is this too basic?
I just can't think of when to use consistency.

2. Also, I don't know the difference between field and domain. Are they the same thing?

3. Is it really necessary to go deep into the Standard Australian English features in an informal AC? Definitely putting them in means that you're meeting one of our criteria: "sophisticated understanding of the concepts of Standard and non-standard English as they relate to informal language usage"
But should you focus on formality too much? Or would you suggest mentioning a few features in the social purpose para (if they fit there) and then a couple in the coherence/ cohesion para?

Thank you very much!
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: cookiedream on April 11, 2018, 02:27:26 pm
Hi everyone!

It would be really great if someone could reply, because I have my AC SAC on the first day of term!

1. Could you please give some examples of consistency (coherence)?
Is it like using the same font, or only particular things are italicised in an article?
Also, for example if it was a blog post, can you say
"The logical ordering of comments below the blog post is consistent to the situational context of an online blog where commentators can reply to the main post at the end of the page."
Or is this too basic?
I just can't think of when to use consistency.

2. Also, I don't know the difference between field and domain. Are they the same thing?

3. Is it really necessary to go deep into the Standard Australian English features in an informal AC? Definitely putting them in means that you're meeting one of our criteria: "sophisticated understanding of the concepts of Standard and non-standard English as they relate to informal language usage"
But should you focus on formality too much? Or would you suggest mentioning a few features in the social purpose para (if they fit there) and then a couple in the coherence/ cohesion para?

Thank you very much!

Hello!

1. Consistency is almost like the repeated use of something in order to serve a particular purpose, which is most often constructing coherence. For example, 'The consistent use of the initialism "VCE", such as in "VCE Biology Units 3/4" (Line 3), throughout  an article about exam tips reinforces the fact that the text is relevant to senior Victorian students. This helps readers navigate through the self-help article and build an overall understanding of it, contributing to its coherence'. As far as I'm aware, consistency can also be used in term of a semantic field (e.g. consistent use of lexical items under the semantic field of Mexican food). Just remember that if a certain linguistic choice only appears once or is only present in one part of a text, that's not consistency - it must appear across the text.

Logical ordering and consistency are two different things. Logical ordering refers to a clear structure (e.g. intro then body para then conclusion) while consistency refers to the constant use of a language choice.

2. I remember being taught that domain is broader than field, but it can vary between teachers. So ask your teacher to confirm :)

3. In informal texts, non-SAE is a lot more pertinent, so focus more on that. You could also mention how SAE is still present to allow interlocutors to form logical links in a conversation, etc., but you don't need to talk a lot about this. Again, confirm with your teacher (maybe write a practice SAE/non-SAE paragraph on an informal text and ask them to have a look at it?). For me, I always focused on formality in my register paragraph which comes last in my ACs. If relevant, you can mention it in other paragraphs too - it depends on the text and how significant certain features appear to be.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on April 17, 2018, 09:18:42 pm
Hello!

Just had a few questions about active and passive voice:

1. Is an infinitive always going to be active voice?

2. Is a present participle/gerund always an active verb?
e.g. 'the boat carrying 36,000 tonnes of wheat sailed..."
Is 'carrying' the gerund? if so, is a gerund always a sign of active voice?

3. If you had the verb phrase "were not told," (this is passive), but can you include the 'not' is in passive or do you need to say "were...told" is in the passive? So do you need to avoid saying the 'not'?

Thank you! :)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: PolySquared on April 25, 2018, 12:12:42 pm
What metalanguage can be used to describe the words "yep" and "yeah"
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on April 25, 2018, 12:45:00 pm
What metalanguage can be used to describe the words "yep" and "yeah"
Hey!
Depends when they're used in that context.
They can be minimal responses or devices for 'back-channelling' - basically just affirming

or they can be used as discourse particles e.g. to signal the end or subsequent change of a topic:
So if both interlocutors were talking about the weather, and then one of them says:
"So yeah I went to the party and she was there."
Sorry if this a bad example for the discourse particle!
Just tried to writed what I felt :)

Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: PolySquared on April 25, 2018, 03:06:55 pm
Hey!
Depends when they're used in that context.
They can be minimal responses or devices for 'back-channelling' - basically just affirming

or they can be used as discourse particles e.g. to signal the end or subsequent change of a topic:
So if both interlocutors were talking about the weather, and then one of them says:
"So yeah I went to the party and she was there."
Sorry if this a bad example for the discourse particle!
Just tried to writed what I felt :)

Thanks for you help. What is the purpose of emphatic stress and lengthening of sounds? What functions and social purposes can these two features achieve?
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on April 25, 2018, 03:36:13 pm
Thanks for you help. What is the purpose of emphatic stress and lengthening of sounds? What functions and social purposes can these two features achieve?
Just letting you know, 'lengthening of sounds' is not a metalanguage term or anything! Just say 'emphatic stress on the phoneme...' and then if the whole word is emphasised, just say 'emphatic stress.'
So social purpose - building rapport, reinforcing a reduced social distance by using this conversational strategy and reinforcing the ingroup membership of people who are in that conversation, as they would expect and demand this conversational strategy from the other interlocutor.
The function (not a really special function, but just general) - emphasise a word and hence the feeling associated with that word, it often alienate the importance of other words (but be very very careful about this. Look at the context first, because that's what it depends on to a large extent.

Thanks!
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: PolySquared on April 25, 2018, 06:11:53 pm
Would you consider this sentence to use Standard or Non-Standard English? "you would've got gold with Kevin Bloody Wilson" - "gold"  is referring to a gold medal, and "Kevin Bloody Wilson" is referring to one of his songs.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Joseph41 on April 26, 2018, 09:28:29 am
Would you consider this sentence to use Standard or Non-Standard English? "you would've got gold with Kevin Bloody Wilson" - "gold"  is referring to a gold medal, and "Kevin Bloody Wilson" is referring to one of his songs.

What are your thoughts? :)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: PolySquared on April 26, 2018, 06:26:59 pm
What are your thoughts? :)

I think it might be relatively non standard. but i dont know why it is non standard and put it into words.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: EulerFan102 on April 26, 2018, 06:37:05 pm
I think it might be relatively non standard. but i dont know why it is non standard and put it into words.

Well, are there any particular parts of it that strike you as being a bit non-standard?
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: PolySquared on April 26, 2018, 06:57:48 pm
Well, are there any particular parts of it that strike you as being a bit non-standard?

Perhaps using the song artist's name as an abstract noun in place of "song". I dont really know
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on April 26, 2018, 07:44:15 pm
Perhaps using the song artist's name as an abstract noun in place of "song". I dont really know
Sorry I'm interrupting this, but just my thoughts,
So I think that sentence is perfectly standard in that context. Both the interlocutors (or there may be more, I just haven't counted) are in a favourable and semantically appropriate context to infer that 'gold' refers to a medal and 'Kevin Bloody Wilson' refers to an artist (also, I don't think it refers to a 'song.' He's a musician, so I think don't mention anything about a 'song'?)
And, also if you think about it otherwise (forget the context), that sentence sounds and means perfectly standard!
So if I didn't know what was going on, I'd interpret that ok, someone's going to get something really really rewarding and precious just like precious gold (this would be metaphorical), or either they're going to get actual, physical gold, just because they've got the support from Kevin Bloody Wilson.
And if I didn't know who he was, that wouldn't matter at all! I'll just need to infer that Kevin...must be a really cool and invaluable person! :)

Sorry if all of this sounds really confusing!
But just as a summary : not everything has to be mentioned in a sentence/s to tick the standard box for those. If it's suitable to the context, then it's perfectly standard.

The sentence would've been non-standard if 'Kevin Bloody Wilson' wasn't capitalised (I mean that first letters of every word, because it's a proper noun)
The contraction 'would've' again is that dual-faceted example. I wouldn't call it non-standard, I'd just call it an informal feature. Why? Because it's perfectly 'standard' (appropriate) for the context that they're in --> it's a conversation, people want short, sharp convo, especially on an informal medium.

Once again, please please feel free to choose not to go by what I said, because I do Eng Lang too!!
So I'm never ever perfect :)
Thanks!

Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: PolySquared on April 26, 2018, 07:57:20 pm
Sorry I'm interrupting this, but just my thoughts,
So I think that sentence is perfectly standard in that context. Both the interlocutors (or there may be more, I just haven't counted) are in a favourable and semantically appropriate context to infer that 'gold' refers to a medal and 'Kevin Bloody Wilson' refers to an artist (also, I don't think it refers to a 'song.' He's a musician, so I think don't mention anything about a 'song'?)
And, also if you think about it otherwise (forget the context), that sentence sounds and means perfectly standard!
So if I didn't know what was going on, I'd interpret that ok, someone's going to get something really really rewarding and precious just like precious gold (this would be metaphorical), or either they're going to get actual, physical gold, just because they've got the support from Kevin Bloody Wilson.
And if I didn't know who he was, that wouldn't matter at all! I'll just need to infer that Kevin...must be a really cool and invaluable person! :)

Sorry if all of this sounds really confusing!
But just as a summary : not everything has to be mentioned in a sentence/s to tick the standard box for those. If it's suitable to the context, then it's perfectly standard.

The sentence would've been non-standard if 'Kevin Bloody Wilson' wasn't capitalised (I mean that first letters of every word, because it's a proper noun)
The contraction 'would've' again is that dual-faceted example. I wouldn't call it non-standard, I'd just call it an informal feature. Why? Because it's perfectly 'standard' (appropriate) for the context that they're in --> it's a conversation, people want short, sharp convo, especially on an informal medium.

Once again, please please feel free to choose not to go by what I said, because I do Eng Lang too!!
So I'm never ever perfect :)
Thanks!

Thanks for your insight, I really appreciate it. Do you think the use of "yeah" and "yep" makes it non standard and the use of "yeah" as a discourse particle
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on April 26, 2018, 08:30:51 pm
Thanks for your insight, I really appreciate it. Do you think the use of "yeah" and "yep" makes it non standard and the use of "yeah" as a discourse particle
I'd just call them informal features. Once again, they're standard or appropriate to the context - it's an informal convo. So informal language like 'yeah' and 'yep' are accepted and encouraged, so they're standard.
Sorry but you know how I think about non-standard, I think to myself has the word and/or the sentence structure, spelling, etc... been changed/modified?
If the answer is yes, then it's probably non-standard.
But nothing's been changed to 'yeah' and 'yep.' Someone once just made these up as synonyms for 'yes' so now everyone says this in an informal context.
But, if the transcript says 'gonna,' 'woujya" (phonological) or "wanna go?" (do you want to go)  then this is informal, but also non-standard! Because the interlocutor has modified or put their own touch to the norm of writing 'want to,' or 'going to.'
And also they've ellipted the subject - non-standard syntax.

Hope I make sense! :)

Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: PolySquared on April 26, 2018, 08:45:48 pm
I'd just call them informal features. Once again, they're standard or appropriate to the context - it's an informal convo. So informal language like 'yeah' and 'yep' are accepted and encouraged, so they're standard.
Sorry but you know how I think about non-standard, I think to myself has the word and/or the sentence structure, spelling, etc... been changed/modified?
If the answer is yes, then it's probably non-standard.
But nothing's been changed to 'yeah' and 'yep.' Someone once just made these up as synonyms for 'yes' so now everyone says this in an informal context.
But, if the transcript says 'gonna,' 'woujya" (phonological) or "wanna go?" (do you want to go)  then this is informal, but also non-standard! Because the interlocutor has modified or put their own touch to the norm of writing 'want to,' or 'going to.'
And also they've ellipted the subject - non-standard syntax.

Hope I make sense! :)

could you explain what you mean by "ellipted the subject - non standard syntax"
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: jesseprior on April 26, 2018, 09:36:56 pm
Hello, I am writing a analytical commentary and I'm having issues with the third and fourth paragraph (prosodic features and content (subsystems). Right now im stuck on linking prosodic features back to (register, standard of english, social purpose, function etc.). I can easily pick up on them because the key is right up on the text, but the text is a sports talk show with comedians in it interviewing sportsman, there is alot of short pauses, lengthening of sound, overlapping speech and emphatic stress on perhaps key words for sentence, e.g. "I think that's fantastic". There also is alot of laughing, because well the hosts are comedians.

Any help is greatly appreciated.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: PolySquared on April 26, 2018, 10:01:54 pm
Hello, I am writing a analytical commentary and I'm having issues with the third and fourth paragraph (prosodic features and content (subsystems). Right now im stuck on linking prosodic features back to (register, standard of english, social purpose, function etc.). I can easily pick up on them because the key is right up on the text, but the text is a sports talk show with comedians in it interviewing sportsman, there is alot of short pauses, lengthening of sound, overlapping speech and emphatic stress on perhaps key words for sentence, e.g. "I think that's fantastic". There also is alot of laughing, because well the hosts are comedians.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

How do you think prosodic features link back? do you have a particular example?
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: jesseprior on April 26, 2018, 10:05:41 pm
Well I would assume overlapping speech means they are familiar / comfortable with eachother, but other then that I am not really sure, and don't even get me started on subsystems, problem my biggest issue.

I attatched the text.(http://)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: PolySquared on April 26, 2018, 10:20:21 pm
Overlapping doesn't seem to be a prominent feature in this text, although you can still comment on it, I wouldn't spend too much time on this area. I would talk about the way they speak, is an interlocutor using non-lexical utterances or are they placing emphatic stress on certain aspects of their speech?
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on May 01, 2018, 05:52:51 pm
Hi everyone!

I'm having some troubles understanding the differences between fronting/front focus ; same thing with right and left dislocation.
For example,
if you say an adverbial is at the start of a sentence (e.g At 5pm,...) what do you call this as? fronting, front focus, or any of the dislocations?

Also, I'd really appreciate some examples for these things, so I can understand the difference a bit more clearly.

Thanks a lot guys! :)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: PolySquared on May 08, 2018, 12:39:42 pm
Does anyone have any evidence to support and contradict innatism as a form of language acquisition? I can't seem to find any information in this area.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on May 09, 2018, 09:40:45 pm
Hi all,
I really need help with some things before my SAC this week, so would love a reply!

1. Just wondering what subsystem would 'incorrect punctuation' go under?
So there's a question on 'describe register and refer to at least three linguistic evidence from more than one subsystem'.
Now there's a lot of unnecessary capitalisation in the text (incorrectly punctuated)
So could I use this as a linguistic evidence to say the register is moderately formal text? (the text is for a formal SA by the way)
But what subsystem would this fall under?
And can I link it to register in the first place? because it does sound more like standard/non-standard thing than register?

2. Is an infinitive considered as the beginning of a subordinate clause?

3. How would you find an example of nominalisation if there were no possessives? (i.e. "the institution's intentions).
Without possessives like these, I'm finding it a bit hard to find nominalisations just by looking at suffixes.
Is there a simpler way?

4. What would be the sentence structure of these:
- Then the removal van did not arrive, leaving us stranded. --> The 'then' is really confusing me. Because 'the removal van did not arrive' would be a main clause, but is it still the main clause even though the 'then' is there? And then 'leaving us stranded' is one subordinate clause right? Would this be a complex sentence?

- just checking, is this a compound-complex sentence?
"The fact that we were helpless was not too disturbing, but the sudden change in the weather was since we were stuck outside."

- "Things did not remain the same for long because things were not quite what they seemed" --> this is a complex sentence right?

Thank you very much guys! :)
Would love some help! :)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: sarahsmith34 on May 14, 2018, 02:08:01 pm
Hi guys,
Was just wondering if anyone had any paragraph ideas for this essay prompt?
'If you want people to share your point of view, the formal register offers the most effective linguistic choices. Do you agree?' 
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Joseph41 on May 14, 2018, 02:12:10 pm
Hi guys,
Was just wondering if anyone had any paragraph ideas for this essay prompt?
'If you want people to share your point of view, the formal register offers the most effective linguistic choices. Do you agree?' 


Hey, welcome to ATAR Notes! :)

What are your thoughts so far? Interesting topic!
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: sarahsmith34 on May 14, 2018, 02:26:04 pm
Hey, welcome to ATAR Notes! :)

What are your thoughts so far? Interesting topic!

Well, I think formal language can be used to establish expertise through the use of jargon and therefore makes the user's points more credible and people would then share the same point of view. But then on the other hand if formal language is used for political correctness for example, it may manipulate the people's views rather than encourage the same point of view.
???????
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Joseph41 on May 14, 2018, 02:50:19 pm
Well, I think formal language can be used to establish expertise through the use of jargon and therefore makes the user's points more credible and people would then share the same point of view. But then on the other hand if formal language is used for political correctness for example, it may manipulate the people's views rather than encourage the same point of view.
???????

Awesome!

I think you're definitely right - formal language can be used in that way, and for that purpose.

Something to consider here, though, is the context of the correspondence. For example, if you're just chatting with your friends and want to convince them of your point of view, would using a highly formal register be most appropriate? Could that actually lead to social distance?

What else comes to mind? :)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on May 26, 2018, 11:19:47 am
Hi all,

I'm not sure how to structure my AC for formal spoken text.

1. Do the phonological features, topic management, etc have to have a separate para? Or can we weave these things into social purpose/context para?

2. Where do we talk about coherence and cohesion strategies? Should this be limited though? Since we have to focus more on phonology as well?

3. Can the topic management, turn taking (discourse) go in the same para as the phonology? Just because this all related to the speech?

Thanks so much guys! :)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: sarangiya on May 26, 2018, 07:08:39 pm
Hello all!
Our teacher has said that pauses are not a part of prosody, but are instead non-fleuncy features.
This made sense to me until a friend suggested that only pauses to think or because of false starts etc were non-fleuncy features, while intentional pauses for emphasis are something else.
Anyone agree and know what? Would it be prosody even then?
Thanks all!!
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: sarangiya on May 26, 2018, 07:12:52 pm
Hi all,

I'm not sure how to structure my AC for formal spoken text.

1. Do the phonological features, topic management, etc have to have a separate para? Or can we weave these things into social purpose/context para?

2. Where do we talk about coherence and cohesion strategies? Should this be limited though? Since we have to focus more on phonology as well?

3. Can the topic management, turn taking (discourse) go in the same para as the phonology? Just because this all related to the speech?

Thanks so much guys! :)
Idk if this will help you but my teacher said the "stylistic and discourse features of the text" dot point should be addressed throughout the essay because they also are presented throughout the whole text.
Cohesion is like glue that sticks the whole text together and can be configured to be many features across a range of subsystems, so I don't think it fits in just one.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on May 27, 2018, 02:14:09 pm
Idk if this will help you but my teacher said the "stylistic and discourse features of the text" dot point should be addressed throughout the essay because they also are presented throughout the whole text.
Cohesion is like glue that sticks the whole text together and can be configured to be many features across a range of subsystems, so I don't think it fits in just one.
Thank you!
I guess it'll be better to ask our teachers what proportion they want of cohesion/coherence and then phonology.
But I do agree with you that because phonological features are throughout the whole text, it wouldn't matter if we weave them constantly through our social purpose / context para.
I've always dedicated a separate para for cohesion and coherence, because I didn't really think they'd link explicitly with any social purpose/ maybe a little bit of context :)
But I'll ask me teacher about this.

Also, I'm a bit puzzled how these are considered adverbials according to the British Council English grammar exercise:

1. I don’t know where the keys are but they’re not in the car for sure. I’ve looked!
--> the exercise said the answer was: 'in the car for sure' is an adverbial in this sentence. But how can you include 'for sure' as an adverbial?

2. The company built the new apartments as cheaply as they could.
--> in this sentence, the answer is: "as cheaply as they could" is an adverbial.
But how can you include 'they could' into this?
I thought the adverbial was only 'as cheaply as'

Could someone please explain me this? Have I got my adverbials wrong?

Thanks all! :)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Why??? on June 01, 2018, 08:33:19 pm
Hey,
I was just wondering what kind of features can be spoken about under standard english. I'm writing an analytical commentary and a part of the rubric requires explicit reference to Standard English. It is a spoken text so I'm not quite sure what kind of things I should be analysing in relation to 'Standard English'.

Thank you in advance!
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: WON0173 on June 02, 2018, 04:59:04 pm
Hi. First time posting here. After reviewing syntactical patterning in terms of formal language, I'm kinda stumped on how parallelism, antithesis, and listing relate to formality, because all I'm getting at is that it usually relates to coherence and cohesion. Not to mention it's properties feel the same for informal language. My teacher says that it depends on the social purpose, to which affects the register, but I'm still lost.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on June 02, 2018, 06:47:10 pm
Hi. First time posting here. After reviewing syntactical patterning in terms of formal language, I'm kinda stumped on how parallelism, antithesis, and listing relate to formality, because all I'm getting at is that it usually relates to coherence and cohesion. Not to mention it's properties feel the same for informal language. My teacher says that it depends on the social purpose, to which affects the register, but I'm still lost.
Hi! Welcome to AtarNotes :)

I don't really see a strong connection between listing, parallelism and antithesis and coherence and cohesion. But like your teacher said, these are syntactical features, and you can definitely use them in a social purpose/ register para.

I just thought to give you examples of these things, and so I found Paul Keating's speech in the 1990s talking about injustices to Aboriginal Australians.
So here are the examples I found, and hopefully you'll see the connection between them and social purpose:

1. Parallelism: "how well we know the land we live in. How well we know our history. How well we recognise the fact that, complex as our contemporary identity is, it cannot be separated from Aboriginal Australia. How well we know what Aboriginal Australians know about Australia."
So this can be linked to social purpose, in that Keating was trying to promote social harmony and encouraging equality between the natives and non-Aboriginals.
You'd lose the opportunity to talk about social purpose here, if you tried to somehow link this to coherence and cohesion.

2. Listing: "That is perhaps the point of this Year of the World's Indigenous People: to bring the dispossessed out of the shadows, to recognise that they are part of us, and that we cannot give indigenous Australians up without giving up many of our own most deeply held values, much of our own identity - and our own humanity."
So this is listing because after the colon, one phrase and two clauses are written.
The list implies that non-Aboriginals need to do a lot now, to ensure they are respectful of Indigenous people --> links with social purpose of encouraging equality and promoting social harmony.

3. Antithesis: "Nowhere in the world, I would venture, is the message more stark than it is in Australia."
So this is antithesis because 'world' and 'Australia.'
Because this sentence gives end focus to Australia, it means that we have a national responsibility. (link to social purpose) And also that this inequality matter is focussed in Australia --> so it sort of gives us that guilt (again, link to social purpose)

I hope these examples help you in some way :)

Thanks!
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: WON0173 on June 02, 2018, 10:04:27 pm
Hi! Welcome to AtarNotes :)

I don't really see a strong connection between listing, parallelism and antithesis and coherence and cohesion. But like your teacher said, these are syntactical features, and you can definitely use them in a social purpose/ register para.

I just thought to give you examples of these things, and so I found Paul Keating's speech in the 1990s talking about injustices to Aboriginal Australians.
So here are the examples I found, and hopefully you'll see the connection between them and social purpose:

1. Parallelism: "how well we know the land we live in. How well we know our history. How well we recognise the fact that, complex as our contemporary identity is, it cannot be separated from Aboriginal Australia. How well we know what Aboriginal Australians know about Australia."
So this can be linked to social purpose, in that Keating was trying to promote social harmony and encouraging equality between the natives and non-Aboriginals.
You'd lose the opportunity to talk about social purpose here, if you tried to somehow link this to coherence and cohesion.

2. Listing: "That is perhaps the point of this Year of the World's Indigenous People: to bring the dispossessed out of the shadows, to recognise that they are part of us, and that we cannot give indigenous Australians up without giving up many of our own most deeply held values, much of our own identity - and our own humanity."
So this is listing because after the colon, one phrase and two clauses are written.
The list implies that non-Aboriginals need to do a lot now, to ensure they are respectful of Indigenous people --> links with social purpose of encouraging equality and promoting social harmony.

3. Antithesis: "Nowhere in the world, I would venture, is the message more stark than it is in Australia."
So this is antithesis because 'world' and 'Australia.'
Because this sentence gives end focus to Australia, it means that we have a national responsibility. (link to social purpose) And also that this inequality matter is focussed in Australia --> so it sort of gives us that guilt (again, link to social purpose)

I hope these examples help you in some way :)

Thanks!

Ah thank you for the reply. I guess I always associated these with coherence and cohesion because parallelism and listing involves emphasis towards specific information, clear information flow, and the way listing affects formatting. And like you said antithesis because it gives front/end focus which is a part of information flow.

While I can understand how they can relate to social purpose, I was also wondering how they would directly relate to formal register for a paragraph on register if possible. If you have to link it to social purpose how would you?
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MissSmiley on June 02, 2018, 10:16:25 pm
Ah thank you for the reply. I guess I always associated these with coherence and cohesion because parallelism and listing involves emphasis towards specific information, clear information flow, and the way listing affects formatting. And like you said antithesis because it gives front/end focus which is a part of information flow.

While I can understand how they can relate to social purpose, I was also wondering how they would directly relate to formal register for a paragraph on register if possible. If you have to link it to social purpose how would you?
Yeah I agree, you could link this to coherence and cohesion the way that you've said :)
As long as you justify things, it shouldn't be a problem :)

So with the register para, I'd say because parallelisms, listing and antithesis are often pre-planned, that's how they contribute to formality. Also, having a disciplined rhythm, for e.g. in parallelisms, is also reflective of formality.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: jesseprior on June 11, 2018, 11:29:58 pm
Does anyone know of evidence of Language Acquisition through the subsystems of language? I have a essay on it and we have to refer to the subsystems to support or contradict the theories of Language Acquisition (Innatism, Behaviourism, Interactionism).

I only know two, being that children use Morphology to apply past tense rules onto irregular verbs ("lose" -> "losed") when they could never have heard someone say that around them (Behaviourism) and that children innately understand the Syntax of a basic sentence structure being (subject - verb - object) without somebody specifically telling them that's how sentences are structured.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: sarangiya on June 12, 2018, 06:38:47 am
I only know two, being that children use Morphology to apply past tense rules onto irregular verbs ("lose" -> "losed") when they could never have heard someone say that around them (Behaviourism) and that children innately understand the Syntax of a basic sentence structure being (subject - verb - object) without somebody specifically telling them that's how sentences are structured.
I would actually say morphological overgeneralisation (what you describe as "losed") is an example of innatism, not behaviourism. It is as you say - the child has unlikely heard that non-standard construction before, hence implying they knew it without any learning or interaction with others. It is innate knowledge, somehow known by children who otherwise shouldn't know. It might be considered an example of Chomsky's theory of universal grammar.

I also think knowing SVO structure is not innate and not something a child demonstrates knowledge of on its own. It is true that the rules aren't explained explicity, but they don't have to be. Children will have heard SVO structure already, and just parrot off the same order from pure imitation (behaviourism). I guess children knowing which part of speech the word is could be considered another example of universal grammar and innatism, though.

Innatism
- morphological/semantic overgeneralisation and umdergeneralisation
- universal grammar
- the fact babies have the ability to learn a language at all - innate brain and muscle structures that make language possible

Behaviourism/interactionism
- vocabulary
- greetings
- pronunciation
- anything that is improved through correction/feedback is interactionism (e.g. correction of 'losed' to 'lost' by parents)
- the fact babies can learn any language to a native standard, dependent solely upon what is taught

It's been a long, long time since I was thinking about units 1/2 so if anyone has any revisions or additions do feel free haha

Good luck
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: davie18 on June 12, 2018, 01:05:00 pm
Can i ask does anyone have like a summary of features of Australian English classified into each of the subsystems, i'm needing to do an analysis of someone speaking and i'm struggling
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MathsQuestIsBad on June 26, 2018, 07:27:19 pm
When looking at coherence, in particular conventions, does grammatical conventions count? For example, the use of Standard Australian English or correct use of punctuation, do these all support conventions and in turn, coherence? Thanks
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: davie18 on June 28, 2018, 02:47:24 pm
Can Someone help me plan an essay with the topic Australian English embodies the ideals that Australians Cherish: Egalitarianism and anti-authoritarianism, sympathy for the battler and desire for a fair go. These characteristics are being eroded by the spread of American English, especially among the young, and the increasing cultural complexity of Australian society.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Bri MT on June 28, 2018, 03:06:42 pm
Can Someone help me plan an essay with the topic Australian English embodies the ideals that Australians Cherish: Egalitarianism and anti-authoritarianism, sympathy for the battler and desire for a fair go. These characteristics are being eroded by the spread of American English, especially among the young, and the increasing cultural complexity of Australian society.

Wow,  that's a long topic. 
Let's break it down into components
Eg.
> Aus Eng embodies the listed values. (How/how not)
> these are being eroded by the spread of Amr Eng, esp in young (why/ why not)
> these are being eroded by Aus becoming more culturally complex (why/ why not)


What are your initial thoughts? 
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: livlaskaridis on July 19, 2018, 07:22:18 pm
Do our quotes and examples need to be from 2018? or can we source them from previous years
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: mtDNA on July 19, 2018, 11:16:17 pm
Do our quotes and examples need to be from 2018? or can we source them from previous years

For contemporary examples, they should be no older than 18 months from the end of year exam (i.e. June 2017).
In terms of linguist quotes, they can be sourced from any time period (you can even site writers like Orwell from the 1950s haha).

Hope this helps!
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: paranoidchair on September 11, 2018, 10:42:25 pm
Hey guys!
Essays are my weak point, so I've been going through high-scoring essays and I've noticed they have A LOT of examples/quotes. To do well, how many examples should I aim for per paragraph? Also, what is a good ratio of quotes to examples? Thanks in advance!  :)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: forbiddensoulxx on September 12, 2018, 08:06:06 pm
Just wondering what are some ways individual identity is built? I'm confused as to how, since the textbook talks about slang and jargon, but I view that more as building social identity rather than individual identity.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: tinkerbell101 on November 14, 2018, 10:44:56 pm
I know this may sound kinda silly but does anyone have any predictions for the text for Sections A or B or the broader essay topic themes for this year's exam? VCAA 2016 and 2017 had a newspaper article for Section B so I wouldn't be surprised if we did (or even didn't) have another newspaper segment/column. I am hoping there will be a spoken text for Section B
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Ashking on November 14, 2018, 11:13:14 pm
I know this may sound kinda silly but does anyone have any predictions for the text for Sections A or B or the broader essay topic themes for this year's exam? VCAA 2016 and 2017 had a newspaper article for Section B so I wouldn't be surprised if we did (or even didn't) have another newspaper segment/column. I am hoping there will be a spoken text for Section B
My teacher thinks there may be some sort of literature, like a poem or short story, as there hasn't been in quite a while... which would mean brushing up on figurative language. Just a guess though.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: jacquii02 on January 10, 2019, 10:51:22 pm
What kind of things should I be revising over the holidays to prepare myself for unit 1 of eng language?? Also, will I need to memorise the IPA for my first outcome? 
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Bucket Hat on January 10, 2019, 11:25:05 pm
What kind of things should I be revising over the holidays to prepare myself for unit 1 of eng language??
Probably nothing.

But if you really want to I'd recommend you get a metalanguage glossary and make a quizlet or Anki flashcard set so that you can frequently test yourself on metalanguage as that would help it stick in your mind and give you a huge headstart!!! (I learnt no metalanguage at all in 1/2 in didn't really start learning it properly until late term 3 in year 12 - which improved my marks massively since that's what the subject revolves around!)

Don't bother with IPA. It can impress an examiner if you learn a couple of examples by memory but mostly it doesn't matter :)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: JezCam on January 10, 2019, 11:32:15 pm
Similar question to the last one.

What should I be revising and studying for Eng lang 3/4?

Currently I have downloaded a glossary for metalanguage and I am reading over it.

I have also downloaded some example essays just to get an idea of the structure and depth I guess.

Is there anything else I should be doing?

Thanks in advance  :D
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: jacquii02 on January 10, 2019, 11:40:14 pm
Probably nothing.

But if you really want to I'd recommend you get a metalanguage glossary and make a quizlet or Anki flashcard set so that you can frequently test yourself on metalanguage as that would help it stick in your mind and give you a huge headstart!!! (I learnt no metalanguage at all in 1/2 in didn't really start learning it properly until late term 3 in year 12 - which improved my marks massively since that's what the subject revolves around!)

Don't bother with IPA. It can impress an examiner if you learn a couple of examples by memory but mostly it doesn't matter :)



thank you so much

Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Bucket Hat on January 10, 2019, 11:42:16 pm
I am reading over it.
I think in general something active (like flashcards which require you to search around in your memory to recall it) is better for making it stick in your memory than something like passive reading - so making a flashcard deck would again be my recommendation (so for the repetitiveness!)

It is good to look over high-scoring essays though :) Gives you a bit of a feel for the structure of the essay intro (intro sentence, sign-post the 3 body-paragraphs, concluding sentence relating to the intro) and then how to structure body paragraphs - it's relatively formulaic from my experience!

p.s. a good tip I read on AN and used in the exam is to have 1 BP agree with the prompt, 1 BP disagree with the prompt, and 1 BP say "it's not black and white and the truth of the prompt statement varies according to context" - I found this added a lot of depth to my essays)

Also - you can start looking for 2019 media examples of examples used in previous exam reports. E.g. if someone talked about how Standard English garners overt prestige in the 2016 exam report, find a 2019 example of Mercedes using the Standard in Australia to reinforce their classy image :)

Good luck and have fun with it - that's what can really help motivate you to go above and beyond! :D

thank you so much
Feel free to name your second-born-child after me
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: JezCam on January 10, 2019, 11:47:01 pm
I think in general something active (like flashcards which require you to search around in your memory to recall it) is better for making it stick in your memory than something like passive reading - so making a flashcard deck would again be my recommendation (so for the repetitiveness!)

It is good to look over high-scoring essays though :) Gives you a bit of a feel for the structure of the essay intro (intro sentence, sign-post the 3 body-paragraphs, concluding sentence relating to the intro) and then how to structure body paragraphs - it's relatively formulaic from my experience!

p.s. a good tip I read on AN and used in the exam is to have 1 BP agree with the prompt, 1 BP disagree with the prompt, and 1 BP say "it's not black and white and the truth of the prompt statement varies according to context" - I found this added a lot of depth to my essays)

Also - you can start looking for 2019 media examples of examples used in previous exam reports. E.g. if someone talked about how Standard English garners overt prestige in the 2016 exam report, find a 2019 example of Mercedes using the Standard in Australia to reinforce their classy image :)

Good luck and have fun with it - that's what can really help motivate you to go above and beyond! :D
Feel free to name your second-born-child after me :P

Thank you so much!
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: christopher_oreilly on January 23, 2019, 01:21:47 pm
Hi!

What are some good tips for writing intros and conclusions?

Thanks!

ps: I don't know if i have posted this in the correct way- so any tips on how to are appreciated!
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: cookiedream on January 23, 2019, 03:28:32 pm
Hi!

What are some good tips for writing intros and conclusions?

Thanks!

ps: I don't know if i have posted this in the correct way- so any tips on how to are appreciated!


First of all, welcome to ATARNotes! ;D

For analytical commentaries, keep your intros short and succinct, such that it includes all the main linguistic features you want to talk about as well as some important sociocultural factors (e.g. names of participants, setting, register, text type, semantic field, social purpose and function). You don't need to write a conclusion for ACs :)

Here's an example of an AC intro:

This text is an informal, spoken conversation between husband and wife, G and K, and their close friend B, who they know for several years. Semantic fields of fishing and local, recent events is followed throughout the transcript. The functions are phatic as well as for the three interlocutors to inform and catch-up with each other. The social purpose is to build rapport and solidarity between K, B and G.


For essays, start with a general statement about the topic at hand, then allocate one (or two, if necessary) sentences for the main argument in each of your body paragraphs. You have to write a conclusion for the essay, and here the structure is kind of similar to that of your intro (start with your main contention, then the main points of your body paragraphs) and you may end the conclusion with a final statement that summarises your essay. Sometimes I would put in a quote (often by David Crystal) and briefly talk about its relevance to the essay topic and language in general.

Here's an example of an essay intro to the question: We should all speak Standard English. To what extent do you agree?

Language is a versatile tool which comes in a number of varieties, one of which is Standard English (SE), that aims to successfully serve a number of social purposes. Through its widely understood nature, the SE variety can help lower communication barriers for a wider number of individuals across different speech communities, hence acting as a world language used for international exchanges. Additionally, SE establishes overt prestige, thereby assisting exchanges in business and other official situations. Conversely, by having everyone speak this variety, there will be less opportunity for one to reflect their cultural heritage and express their linguistic creativity, both of which often contain features that deviate from SE. Whilst Standard English is pivotal in effectively allowing conversation in many situations, it should only be used to a certain extent due to greater preference for non-Standard English in other circumstances.

Hope that makes sense!

- cookiedream
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: christopher_oreilly on January 23, 2019, 04:56:04 pm
Thankyou so much! Just another question, how should  I embed quote into conclusion to conform to assessors standards?? Should I say something like: As famous linguist once said........

Thanks again!
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: cookiedream on January 23, 2019, 05:02:12 pm
Thankyou so much! Just another question, how should  I embed quote into conclusion to conform to assessors standards?? Should I say something like: As famous linguist once said........

Thanks again!

Yeah that's completely fine! I did something similar in the final year exam and it seemed to have worked out well ;D

For SACs, however, your teacher may have a different preference (and when it comes to SACs, you need to conform to your teacher to guarantee a higher mark). So I recommend asking them first, finding out what they prefer (I know a teacher who really dislikes having quotes in the conclusion) and then maybe writing a practice piece and getting their feedback.

No problem! Glad I could help :)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: jollyboat on February 28, 2019, 03:46:36 pm
I was wondering if anyone knows whether we can write in dot points in the SA section of the 3/4 exam?
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Bri MT on February 28, 2019, 05:21:47 pm
I was wondering if anyone knows whether we can write in dot points in the SA section of the 3/4 exam?

As for any of the English subjects you need to use full sentences following SAE conventions, and can't use dot points at all in the exam
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: jollyboat on February 28, 2019, 07:43:32 pm
As for any of the English subjects you need to use full sentences following SAE conventions, and can't use dot points at all in the exam

Ew but thanks for the reply
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: atarmaster on March 10, 2019, 07:10:09 pm
when answering a question about informal language - how does one explain why a certain lexical item is informal?
for example an online chat was given and the lexeme 'geeeeeee' was used - how do u explain how it lowers the register??
aside from 'it is a non-standard lexeme'
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: skzcookie on March 19, 2019, 08:11:04 pm
Does anyone have any practise sacs for Unit 3 AOS 1. I feel so unprepared for this sac. Our whole class feels like we've learnt nothing! help!
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: w0lfqu33n89 on March 20, 2019, 11:39:59 am
hey y'all I posted this in Lit but thought maybe here as well I just need some critiquing on my essay, be as mean as you like I wanna pass  :)

The death of the maids was not the fault of Odysseus and Telemachus but rather, Greek Society

The Penelopiad written by author Margaret Atwood is a story about the death of twelve innocent maid servants. Margaret Atwood’s goal in this novel is to properly explore the reason why they were killed and who is to blame. Odysseus and Telemachus, two powerful greek men who are the ones to take the lives of these innocent girls are not only to blame but the disgusting abuse of Male Privilege, the Gods and Penelope’s desire for a voice.

The social hierarchy of Greece in this time allows men to have the privilege of weapons and words. Men are perceived in this novel as tainted and evil and so they should be as all they do is use their privileges as a way of selfish gain and for the gift of power and are yet still “never punished.” Having power in this era is the same as money and authority. Men are the prison guards and women are the prisoners. “it was not fair.” After learning that women have practically given up and “could not refuse,” as every man’s gain was at the expense of a woman, it is appalling to know there was a society as corrupt as this one. An example of men committing to selfish and vial acts at the expense of a woman is when the Odysseus leaves for Troy and the Suitors take it upon themselves to rip away any ounce of authority from under Penelope’s feet and drown her in the override of devilish masculinity. “They were like vultures when they spot a dead cow…every vulture from miles around is tearing up the carcass.” This quote refers too Penelope being left in Ithaca alone without Odysseus because the life of a woman is following the shadow of a man. The Suitors take this opportunity to force Penelope into marrying one of them, not for the want of Penelope but for the desire of the money and power given to them if marriage was to occur. This alone, shows how women are seen as nothing else but powerless property to be traded. They also helped themselves to the maids and the kingdoms food, “they probably thought nothing of it.” Men are evil and will snatch anything they can for a speck of power, hence why the maids were brutally murdered. It was at their expense that Odysseus and Telemachus could take a stand to remind the women that they have the power and are capable of many things, so they have to abide by them.


The Gods should certainly be blamed for the death of the maids as from a young age, men are bought up and encouraged to destroy and conquer the enemy. Although this refers to war, men are still fixated on using brutality and deceitful acts as a way to gain power. Everything people did in these days was for the Gods “because the gods were just.” But even the gods aren’t as innocent as they seem as even “they were always raping someone.” Men are taught by the Gods that violence equals justice, this is another factor to the murder of the maids. “it was demeaning.” While Odysseus was away he pretended to expect the women to be disloyal and took it upon himself to justify his authority by murdering the maids simply because its what the Gods want, but even though the gods seem wise and powerful they are described as “nasty” and “childish.” This is unfair to the extent that it is one of the worst acts to be committed, murder for no reason but your own gain. Twelve innocent fragile lives for one selfish leader. Why? Because the suffering of women is celebrated by men. In greek myths and stories, men are always the heroes, the warriors but no one ever focuses on how women were the price. It proves the fact how Greek religion is corrupt. Greek Gods are celebrated for their achievements in violence and brutality, whilst Goddesses are more celebrated for their spirituality and purity. The gods encourage other men to attempt and commit such celebrated crimes for the prize of power. Women are basically “doomed by the gods to a life that is a living death.” To draw on the fact more, men are the dirty, corrupt warriors who win pure women as a prize for their achievements.













Of course, it could just be of human nature and Penelope’s “determined nature” and unwinding desire for a life like a mans that is to blame for the death of the maids, Penelope even admits that her fathers “desire to protect himself” was “understandable.” Does that mean if Penelope was handed the same privilege as men they would do the same? Atwood even asks herself “what was Penelope really up to?” Is it just fate or misfortune that had lead them to be on the receiving end of this absurd brutality? Human’s are known to be selfish to protect themselves from harm, even Penelope chose those specific twelve maids to help her in acts destined to be punished for. It was doubtful knowledge to know that a murder was just waiting to happen, Penelope knew the consequences of risking her maids like this. She even took it upon her selfish mind to force the maids to pretend to be in love with the Suitors, which lead to the rape of the maids. Early on in the book she is described as “a stick used to beat other women with”, and this is exactly what she is doing for her own selfish gain when it comes to her faithful and innocent maids. It’s not only Male Privilege to blame, but also Penelope. It just shows how if the roles were reversed women such as Penelope would not hesitate to do just the same.

To conclude, whilst Odysseus and Telemachus are victims of the prejudice society they inhabit,  it is down to  Male Privilege, The Gods and Penelope  to blame for the cold-blooded murder of the poor innocent maids, simply because of the yearning for power and money, and the monumental influence by the Gods on how money and power is the key to a successful life. The maids were killed with no reason and never got the justice they deserve.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: jollyboat on March 20, 2019, 05:31:03 pm
Does anyone know whether an expletive is any swear word, or whether expletives only refer to swear words used in frustration/surprise?
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MB_ on March 20, 2019, 05:39:34 pm
Does anyone know whether an expletive is any swear word, or whether expletives only refer to swear words used in frustration/surprise?
Expletives are often defined as being that but I'm not sure how much it matters in the context of assessment. It might be best to ask your teacher.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: jollyboat on March 20, 2019, 06:00:53 pm
Does anyone have any practise sacs for Unit 3 AOS 1. I feel so unprepared for this sac. Our whole class feels like we've learnt nothing! help!

Yeah my class I think feels the same. What type of sac are you doing? I have an essay soon on informal language and I'm finding it difficult to find more than one essay topic about informal language, which is making it kinda hard to revise...
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: lafawndalives on March 30, 2019, 01:08:21 pm
Hi!

I was just wondering if coherence and cohesion contribute to the formality of a text? For instance, would it be correct to say that 'the lack of coherence in the piece reflects its informality?

Thanks!
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Jimmmy on April 05, 2019, 04:39:33 pm
when answering a question about informal language - how does one explain why a certain lexical item is informal?
for example an online chat was given and the lexeme 'geeeeeee' was used - how do u explain how it lowers the register??
aside from 'it is a non-standard lexeme'
It being non-standard is pretty much central to it, maybe clarify through its use in an informal setting (eg. texting a friend).
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: MrVCEEnglishLanguageTeacher on April 24, 2019, 01:07:56 pm
Anyone looking for a student to tutor for Y12 EL?

I have a student who's seeking additional assistance who is located in the inner-north west. This particular student is a high achiever and wishes to seek assistance from someone who has also performed well and is a recent graduate.

Please feel free to DM me for further details if you are interested with a brief guide about yourself.

Thank you!
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: jollyboat on April 25, 2019, 12:01:59 pm
Hi!

I was just wondering if coherence and cohesion contribute to the formality of a text? For instance, would it be correct to say that 'the lack of coherence in the piece reflects its informality?

Thanks!

Informal texts (ie. spoken conversations, text conversations etc.) tend to have instant feedback from the listener/reader compared to formal texts (ie books, news reports etc.) where the speaker doesn't get instant feedback from the listeners/readers.

So formal texts need to be absolutely clear/coherent off the bat if they want to be understood, whereas speakers in informal texts can get away with not being completely coherent as the other interlocutors can ask for clarification if they don't understand something.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: theKKCD on April 27, 2019, 02:36:04 pm
Hi!

I was just wondering if coherence and cohesion contribute to the formality of a text? For instance, would it be correct to say that 'the lack of coherence in the piece reflects its informality?

Thanks!

Although it isn't technically wrong to say that a lack of coherence reflects informality, I reckon that there are probably quite a bit more salient features that you could use in your analysis to back up your idea of the register of a text. IMO a lack of coherence might result from use of non-standard english or an off-the-cuff speaking style, both of which would probably relate better to register than incoherence.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Choco99 on May 26, 2019, 11:27:26 am
Hey! I was wondering where we could find essay questions to practice for English Language.
Thank you!
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: EulerFan102 on May 26, 2019, 04:52:20 pm
Hey! I was wondering where we could find essay questions to practice for English Language.

Hey!
A good source of essay prompts is the bank of past VCAA exams.
If you're looking for essay prompts on a particular topic, let me know what the topic is and I can give you a list of past VCAA prompts on that topic and maybe some other ones as well  ;D
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: jack.cameron on May 28, 2019, 04:34:30 pm
how does one actually enjoy english language. I'm primarily a math/science student and do better at eng lang than standard english, but hate it anyways. Is there any techniques anyone has to make it somewhat enjoyable
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Joseph41 on May 28, 2019, 04:39:46 pm
how does one actually enjoy english language. I'm primarily a math/science student and do better at eng lang than standard english, but hate it anyways. Is there any techniques anyone has to make it somewhat enjoyable

Welcome to ATAR Notes! Are you in Year 11 or 12 atm? :)

Are you mostly disliking the content itself or more like, the assessments/structure of the course?
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Choco99 on May 31, 2019, 08:49:59 pm
Hey!
If you're looking for essay prompts on a particular topic, let me know what the topic is and I can give you a list of past VCAA prompts on that topic and maybe some other ones as well  ;D
 
 I'd like essay's on Social identity, language change and Jargon
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Bri MT on May 31, 2019, 09:39:13 pm

I'm currently year 12. I don't struggle with the content it's just I find the whole subject completely boring, likes theres nothing worse that I could think of doing, than sitting down and doing a section A and B

As a STEM student I liked that eng lang has a strong focus on looking for evidence,  applying it to the context & using jargon.

I knew that in eng lang I was learning, not just making things up,  and that's how it engaged me.

 Hopefully that approach can help you but I can't be confident it will since obviously there's a lot of differences between STEM students. 

Good luck and feel free to update us with if/how your attitude to eng lang changes :)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: EulerFan102 on June 01, 2019, 10:02:05 am
I'd like essay's on Social identity, language change and Jargon

Okay beaut!  ;D Here's some essay topics:

Social identity:
Past VCAA topics:
Language and identity are inextricably linked. (2012)
Your use of language sends out lots of little messages, not just about your level of education and where you come from, but about how you would like to be perceived. (VCAA 2016 sample, 2008)
The language choices we make reflect who we are and the social groups to which we belong. (2014)
Other essay prompts:
Standard English tells you what’s being said; non-Standard English tells you who’s saying it.
Varying one’s language allows one’s identity to take on a chameleon-like changeability.

Language change:
Past VCAA topics:
The nature of digital communication is changing the way language is used today in Australia. (2016)
In the 21st century, Australian English embraces change, in spite of concerns from traditionalists. (2014)
The pressures to maintain traditional forms of language are as strong as the forces for change. (2003)
Examine the variety of attitudes towards the effect of [high-speed communication] technologies on English in Australia. (2012)
Other essay prompts:
Australian English is changing to reflect modern society.
Online communication is blurring the lines between written and spoken language.

Jargon:
Past VCAA topics:
Those who are critical of the use of jargon do not appreciate its vital role in communication. (2016)
Has corporate-speak infiltrated every domain of public discourse? (2012)
How does jargon (professional or popular) create cohesiveness within a speech community? (2004)
Other essay prompts:
Jargon only exists to confound and befuddle.
Jargon is a double-edged sword: it can both facilitate and hinder effective communication.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Choco99 on June 05, 2019, 09:45:05 pm
I just realised how much I’m struggling with finding quotes! I’m doing so much research through social media and T.V but I feel like I’m not getting the right quotes and I’m wasting time! Does anyone know where I can find some really good quotes to use for my essays?
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: AngelWings on June 05, 2019, 10:34:14 pm
I just realised how much I’m struggling with finding quotes! I’m doing so much research through social media and T.V but I feel like I’m not getting the right quotes and I’m wasting time! Does anyone know where I can find some really good quotes to use for my essays?
Have you had a look through here? Generally I’d recommend checking up books or articles by Kate Burridge, David Crystal, perhaps Stephen Fry and some by Julian Burnside, amongst other linguists. I’d also be checking out any linguistics-related articles on The Conversation or any newspaper, which might include some great relevant and recent quotes and examples.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: theKKCD on June 06, 2019, 01:57:03 pm
Does anyone know where I can find some really good quotes to use for my essays?

The main thing with quotes is that they could literally show up anywhere - personally I liked to keep a notes document on my phone where I could just jot anything down if it came up.

As for looking for quotes deliberately, I found that advertising and celebrities were really good sources of quotes. For instance you might look at an ethnolectal speaker such as Franco Cozzo or someone who is very overtly Australian such as Nick Cummins. Even if you don't have a lot of quotes, many of them can be analysed from different angles, so you can spin some of them to fit into what you need.

There's still quite a while before you need an extensive quote bank but hopefully some of that helped!
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Vipatter22 on June 12, 2019, 07:00:41 pm
Hi!

Can anyone tell me if it is okay to do unit 3 and 4 English language in year 11 as I am completing year 10 English in year 9. So I will have to complete unit 1 and 2 next year. I'm not sure if it is allowed because this means I will not do any english in year 12. Do I have to repeat english?
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: brothanathan on June 12, 2019, 07:10:13 pm
Hi!

Can anyone tell me if it is okay to do unit 3 and 4 English languages in year 11 as I am completing year 10 English in year 9. So I will have to complete unit 1 and 2 next year. I'm not sure if it is allowed because this means I will not do any English in year 12. Do I have to repeat English?

1. Make sure you memorize all the Metalanguage and some IPA if you can.

2.  No, you don't have to, a lot of people recommend doing two Englishes to see which one suits them the most and some even do both.

3.  No, you can do general English in Year 12 and you're not repeating English because you would have already done English Language 3/4, although you might want to check with your VCE English teachers.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Remy33 on July 17, 2019, 10:10:40 pm
Hi, I was wondering whether doing 3/4 Eng Lang is a necessary or useful foundation to have if you want to pursue linguistics at uni? I did 1/2 last year but then not enough people at my school chose it for 3/4 so I'm just doing mainstream English now. If I were to study linguistics at uni, how behind would I be without 3/4 knowledge? Cheers.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: EulerFan102 on July 21, 2019, 10:13:23 am
Hi, I was wondering whether doing 3/4 Eng Lang is a necessary or useful foundation to have if you want to pursue linguistics at uni? I did 1/2 last year but then not enough people at my school chose it for 3/4 so I'm just doing mainstream English now. If I were to study linguistics at uni, how behind would I be without 3/4 knowledge? Cheers.

Hey!
(Just some context, I did EngLang at school and also did a minor in linguistics at uni)

So EngLang 3/4 is a really nice foundation for linguistics at uni. This is particularly in relation to the technical stuff you learn (i.e. metalanguage). However, there is still quite a difference between the two: EngLang spends the bulk of 3/4 looking at why people use different varieties of language. On the other hand, linguistics (at the least the bits that I did) doesn't look at this so much, instead looking more at the 'nuts and bolts' of language (i.e. how it's pronounced, how it forms, how sentences are constructed).

Overall, I think that EngLang 3/4 is a nice foundation for uni-level linguistics, but it is not at all necessary. Uni linguistics is taught with no requirement or expectation that you've done any units of EngLang. So if you're passionate about linguistics, definitely still do it!  ;D
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Remy33 on July 21, 2019, 11:20:30 am
^ Thanks so much EulerFan, that's really helpful info.

Hope you don't mind a follow-up question, when you did linguistics at uni (I'm assuming for undergrad) were you able to choose what area of linguistics to 'specialise' in, like sociolinguistics, ethnolinguistics etc? Thanks.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: EulerFan102 on July 21, 2019, 01:47:45 pm
^ Thanks so much EulerFan, that's really helpful info.

Hope you don't mind a follow-up question, when you did linguistics at uni (I'm assuming for undergrad) were you able to choose what area of linguistics to 'specialise' in, like sociolinguistics, ethnolinguistics etc? Thanks.

No worries at all, good to hear!  ;D

So this is no doubt going to vary depending on what uni you end up at. I was at Monash, where the first two units you do are compulsory (they were on the technical side of language, so stuff like morphology, lexicology and syntax). From there, you're pretty free to choose whatever part of linguistics interests you most (so I did two sociolinguistics units as Kate Burridge was teaching them lol).

I would recommend having a look at some uni info pages about what they offer in the linguistics realm. For example, Monash's page is here, and no doubt other unis have similar pages, and there you can see what's required for a major/minor and all the options you have for units/specialisations within linguistics.

Let me know if you have any other questions!  ;D
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Holl_Ven on July 21, 2019, 02:15:10 pm
SEND HELP.....URGENT
so i have my oral presentations this coming week and need advice.
My topic is about 'paramedic assault and overtime shifts.'
Problem is I can't seem to find a suitable hook.
Can someone please suggest ideas in relation to my topic?
Thank you in advance
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: AngelWings on July 21, 2019, 02:50:32 pm
SEND HELP.....URGENT
so i have my oral presentations this coming week and need advice.
My topic is about 'paramedic assault and overtime shifts.'
Problem is I can't seem to find a suitable hook.
Can someone please suggest ideas in relation to my topic?
Thank you in advance
Welcome to AN! If I'm not mistaken, this is an English (mainstream) oral?*

I've seen some people use statistics, stories and anecdotes (where applicable) to great effect. An example of this could be: "According to [insert source], [insert number]% of paramedics have reported that they have been injured, assaulted or worked overtime under poor conditions. [insert number]% of paramedics have said that they believe that this is all a normal part of the job, yet paramedic assault and unexplained overtime shouldn't be another dot point of their job descriptions." From there, you could lead on with your reasons and arguments.

Hope that helps! :) 

* It's pretty tricky to find the right place to post, so I've put a link to the appropriate board for this post for your future reference; you don't have to change anything right now. It was really close, so thanks for giving it a go! As you use the forum more, you'll start to get a feel as to where it's best to post things.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Joseph41 on July 25, 2019, 05:13:56 pm
Hi, I was wondering whether doing 3/4 Eng Lang is a necessary or useful foundation to have if you want to pursue linguistics at uni? I did 1/2 last year but then not enough people at my school chose it for 3/4 so I'm just doing mainstream English now. If I were to study linguistics at uni, how behind would I be without 3/4 knowledge? Cheers.

EulerFan102 has pretty much nailed it above I think (I also did Linguistics at Monash, so could be different elsewhere?). For context, in my very first Linguistics lecture at uni, we did a poll re: whether or not you did EngLang in Year 12. I reckon it was about a 50/50 split. I found it useful, sure, but it's certainly not needed. If you think about it, people studying the degree might not have studied EngLang for a whole range of reasons.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: SmartWorker on July 26, 2019, 07:02:49 pm
Hey there,

I am yr 10, and looking to do eng lang 1/2 in yr 11 (next yr). I was just wondering how I can prepare for this, considering I have been doing english since yr 7.

Thanks :)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: AngelWings on July 26, 2019, 07:54:20 pm
Hey there,

I am yr 10, and looking to do eng lang 1/2 in yr 11 (next yr). I was just wondering how I can prepare for this, considering I have been doing english since yr 7.

Thanks :)
Most schools don't have a Eng Lang stream between Years 7 to 10, so most students will be in the exact same boat as you. Given that Eng Lang U1/2 starts from the very beginning and assumes no background, you won't be at any disadvantage and generally, no preparation is needed.

If you do still want to do some preparation regardless, I'd begin to look at the study design for Eng Lang U1/2 to see what you'll be up against. Perhaps have a quick glance at metalanguage just to be familiar with the type of terminology you'll be using, but don't get too hung up on memorising any of it, as this will come when you do the course.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: bacteriophage on July 31, 2019, 10:34:39 pm
Hiya,
Quick question relating to metalanguage and the scope of the 3/4 study design...
My teacher today discouraged my class from using the term 'diminutive' in our analysis of texts, for the reason of it 'not being on the study design and thus not assessable'
But I'm a bit confused because despite this being one of my favourite metalanguage buzz words to whip out in an AC, I've also seen and heard it used in many places including at the ATARNotes lectures. I could have sworn it was acceptable to use this term, even though it isn't specifically listed on the study design.
Could anyone clarify? Thanks!
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: EulerFan102 on August 01, 2019, 11:24:40 am
Quick question relating to metalanguage and the scope of the 3/4 study design...
My teacher today discouraged my class from using the term 'diminutive' in our analysis of texts, for the reason of it 'not being on the study design and thus not assessable'
But I'm a bit confused because despite this being one of my favourite metalanguage buzz words to whip out in an AC, I've also seen and heard it used in many places including at the ATARNotes lectures. I could have sworn it was acceptable to use this term, even though it isn't specifically listed on the study design.

Okay, first of all, great question.  ;D ;D
Here's my two-cents-worth:

I used to advice people to learn as much metalanguage as they could, and to try and really push their metalanguage beyond what was listed on the EngLang Study Design.
However, on the VCAA examination report from last year (link here), the EngLang examiners wrote that students should "[l]earn and understand the metalinguistic terms and concepts published in the VCE English Language Study Design (pages 17 and 18)" and "[a]void use of language terms not on the list".
I don't think they've ever mentioned this point before on examiner's report, but they seem to be making quite a strong point. So I agree with your teacher in that regard, and now as a tutor I get students to now focus strictly on metalanguage in the Study Design.

What's difficult about this is how to describe some things (e.g. diminutives) with metalanguage that is in the Study Design. VCAA does mention "suffixation in Australian English" (Study Design, p. 17), but they don't have a word equivalent to 'diminutives', which is a lil painful tbh.

(oh, and also what's slightly annoying about this is when VCAA uses non-Study Design metalanguage. Like they had a question about proper nouns on the exam a few years ago, and a question on verb tense more recently. Proper nouns and tense are both not in the Study Design, and yet they've still cropped up on exams...)

So yeah, VCAA seems to not want to see metalanguage terms that aren't in the Study Design. But it's often difficult to do this when a term isn't in there.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Joseph41 on August 01, 2019, 12:38:25 pm
Okay, first of all, great question.  ;D ;D
Here's my two-cents-worth:

I used to advice people to learn as much metalanguage as they could, and to try and really push their metalanguage beyond what was listed on the EngLang Study Design.
However, on the VCAA examination report from last year (link here), the EngLang examiners wrote that students should "[l]earn and understand the metalinguistic terms and concepts published in the VCE English Language Study Design (pages 17 and 18)" and "[a]void use of language terms not on the list".
I don't think they've ever mentioned this point before on examiner's report, but they seem to be making quite a strong point. So I agree with your teacher in that regard, and now as a tutor I get students to now focus strictly on metalanguage in the Study Design.

What's difficult about this is how to describe some things (e.g. diminutives) with metalanguage that is in the Study Design. VCAA does mention "suffixation in Australian English" (Study Design, p. 17), but they don't have a word equivalent to 'diminutives', which is a lil painful tbh.

(oh, and also what's slightly annoying about this is when VCAA uses non-Study Design metalanguage. Like they had a question about proper nouns on the exam a few years ago, and a question on verb tense more recently. Proper nouns and tense are both not in the Study Design, and yet they've still cropped up on exams...)

So yeah, VCAA seems to not want to see metalanguage terms that aren't in the Study Design. But it's often difficult to do this when a term isn't in there.

I didn't know that! Seems kinda weird. Like, I can see why you shouldn't get extra marks or whatever for using different metalanguage, but seems unusual to be actively discouraged. 🤔
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: bacteriophage on August 01, 2019, 04:34:55 pm
Okay, first of all, great question.  ;D ;D
Here's my two-cents-worth:

I used to advice people to learn as much metalanguage as they could, and to try and really push their metalanguage beyond what was listed on the EngLang Study Design.
However, on the VCAA examination report from last year (link here), the EngLang examiners wrote that students should "[l]earn and understand the metalinguistic terms and concepts published in the VCE English Language Study Design (pages 17 and 18)" and "[a]void use of language terms not on the list".
I don't think they've ever mentioned this point before on examiner's report, but they seem to be making quite a strong point. So I agree with your teacher in that regard, and now as a tutor I get students to now focus strictly on metalanguage in the Study Design.

What's difficult about this is how to describe some things (e.g. diminutives) with metalanguage that is in the Study Design. VCAA does mention "suffixation in Australian English" (Study Design, p. 17), but they don't have a word equivalent to 'diminutives', which is a lil painful tbh.

(oh, and also what's slightly annoying about this is when VCAA uses non-Study Design metalanguage. Like they had a question about proper nouns on the exam a few years ago, and a question on verb tense more recently. Proper nouns and tense are both not in the Study Design, and yet they've still cropped up on exams...)

So yeah, VCAA seems to not want to see metalanguage terms that aren't in the Study Design. But it's often difficult to do this when a term isn't in there.

thanks for this clarification, very helpful!
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: 73627 on August 03, 2019, 04:40:53 pm
Hi uh this is my first question & I don’t really know how this works so please bear with me 🙏

Regarding ACs, my teacher taught us how to construct them using the subsystem method but after I went to an ATAR notes lecture in July, I learnt that the subsystem method is not ideal, and it’s better to use the other method (I think it’s called the ‘big ideas’ method or something?). Anyway, I tried to use this new method in a recent AC and I scored fairly well (for me at least) except the cross-marker said that my structure was a bit of a mess. Can I get some advice on how to structure an AC using the ‘big ideas’ method? And how do I integrate coherence and cohesion to it?

Thank youuuu
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: bacteriophage on August 05, 2019, 08:09:56 pm
Hi all,
HELP!
I have an analytical commentary SAC tomorrow on U4AOS1, specifically Australian Identity.
In a previous AC I used the structure of writing one paragraph on register, one on social purpose and one on coherence / cohesion (written) or prosody / discourse features (spoken) and I did quite well on that.
But today one of my school's elang teachers advised her class NOT to use that structure for this AC for the reason that 'students need to be discussing register and social purpose throughout the AC and not just in one paragraph, and ideally for each example'.
The structure this teacher advised her students to use was one in which they open with a strong example from early in the text grouped with similar examples, then a paragraph on a specific feature and related examples, and a third on a broad feature, such as identity.
Now I'm really not sure how to structure because I was originally very confident in the register, social purpose, coherence/cohesion approach but am alarmed to hear this teacher discouraging this for the Aus identity SAC...
Does anyone have some thoughts?
thanks
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: anna.comet on August 06, 2019, 05:27:49 pm
Hey @bacteriophage!

I'm really sorry that I didn't get to this question in time before your SAC! I hope that it went well though! I thought that I would still answer this question because it will still be relevant for the EOY Exam.

I'm 100% on your side. I used a very similar structure for all of my ACs throughout Year 12, and I thought that it allowed a great depth of discussion, allowed me to show off as much metalanguage relevant for U3 (and a bit from U4) as possible, as well as being a pretty standard formula that was applicable for any AC. My advice at the end of the day is to stick to your guns. You say that you are confident in this structure, and I think that whichever structure you are most comfortable and confident in is the one that you should use for the EOY exam.

Further, the other teacher's suggestion sounds a bit whack... it sounds a bit incoherent in terms of providing examples from all over the text, as well as being a bit too specific on certain parts of the text and not really viewing the text as a whole. Maybe just take a quick reflection/ look over the feedback for this SAC, and then change your work accordingly for the next SAC. However, for the EOY exam, I would recommend your previous structure, because it's actually a really strong format!

Good luck with the rest of Eng Lang and I really hope that you are enjoying the subject!
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: bacteriophage on August 09, 2019, 10:01:45 am
Hey @bacteriophage!

I'm really sorry that I didn't get to this question in time before your SAC! I hope that it went well though! I thought that I would still answer this question because it will still be relevant for the EOY Exam.

I'm 100% on your side. I used a very similar structure for all of my ACs throughout Year 12, and I thought that it allowed a great depth of discussion, allowed me to show off as much metalanguage relevant for U3 (and a bit from U4) as possible, as well as being a pretty standard formula that was applicable for any AC. My advice at the end of the day is to stick to your guns. You say that you are confident in this structure, and I think that whichever structure you are most comfortable and confident in is the one that you should use for the EOY exam.

Further, the other teacher's suggestion sounds a bit whack... it sounds a bit incoherent in terms of providing examples from all over the text, as well as being a bit too specific on certain parts of the text and not really viewing the text as a whole. Maybe just take a quick reflection/ look over the feedback for this SAC, and then change your work accordingly for the next SAC. However, for the EOY exam, I would recommend your previous structure, because it's actually a really strong format!

Good luck with the rest of Eng Lang and I really hope that you are enjoying the subject!


Thankyou so much for this @anna.comet
a massive help indeed
for my SAC I ended up using my usual structure, the 'big ideas' approach, and I'm happy enough with what I produced. I spoke to my classroom teacher about it and he said essentially exactly what you said, so I was relatively reassured to hear that again.
Thanks again for the help
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: grace b on August 12, 2019, 12:53:13 pm
Hi can someone please help with Section C!! My sac for Unit 4 AoS1 is an essay on Australian Identity, more specifically the varieties of Australian English and the attitudes towards them. Can someone help and explain basically AoS1 in a nutshell or at least a little about what my teacher wants me to write about i am so confused in class. Thank you!!
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: anna.comet on August 13, 2019, 06:52:42 pm
Hi Grace! Welcome to AtarNotes :~)

U4 AOS1 is essentially about Australian English, from its conception in the late 1700s, until the present day. The number one authority on what will be tested in this AOS is VCAA (see the study design, page 24-25: https://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/Documents/vce/englishlanguage/EnglishLanguageSD_2016_Annotated.pdf), and essentially VCAA breaks down that you want to discuss:

- Australian identity (the whole range of identities of the different people that call themselves 'Australian')
- The Australian accent (broad, general and cultivated)
- Regional variation (mostly in a lexical sense)
- Aboriginal Englishes and Ethnolects
- Why language is important in sculpting our national identity

When you teacher asks about 'attitudes', this is essentially asking for a discussion about what is considered 'standard' and what is considered 'non-standard', and what sort of prestige is assigned to either of these.

I would really recommend discussing at least ethnolects and Aboriginal Englishes, but a paragraph on what is considered the 'stereotypical Australian identity' would also be really interesting, i.e. is the 'laid-back, larrikin, blond beach bum' still a realistic idea of what an Australian is? Does our language reflect a changing Australian identity? Compare the AusE of the past with the AusE of the present, and of the future. That's essentially the aim of writing an essay for this AOS.

Good luck for your essay! Feel free to reply back if you have any more questions :~)



Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: w0lfqu33n89 on August 19, 2019, 03:08:30 pm
you English peeps, ik this is VCE and I am a year 10 but I figured you guys would be more able to help as you have studied this novel/text and have more experience. I am writing an essay for TWELVE ANGRY MEN, and need help with the topic sentence.

my topic question Is "how does twelve angry men suggest that prejudice and self-interest are the key enemies of justice?"

I have a few ideas but my plan is more empty then it is full I need help please.

For my body paragraphs I have chosen

1 Prejudice
2 Self Interest
3 Juror 8 (and how the author uses this character to symbolise the importance of justice)

Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Remy33 on August 19, 2019, 04:42:47 pm
^ Have you written anything already? It might be more helpful if you could have a crack at it yourself first and we can give you suggestions on how to improve or what else to add. :)

Btw I think this goes more under VCE English than English Language.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: kimokeeffe on August 23, 2019, 05:21:41 pm
hey guys! currently in the process of doing my subject selections for next year, just wanted to know a little bit more about the english language course, and what you guys think of it :)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: anna.comet on August 24, 2019, 05:28:36 pm
Hey there! I always found the subject selection process soooo fun and sooo exciting! It's excellent to see that you are taking the opportunity to ask others about their experiences, and getting outside opinions! Your course will be tailored to your learning style and interests more that way! Go you!  ;D ;D

Year 11 English Language and Year 12 English Language are wildly different. However, both are super interesting and provide good historical and contextual information regarding how we stumbled upon the English(es) of 2019!

The Year 11 Course is roughly as follows...

Unit 1: Basic linguistics terminology, how to describe the language that we see and hear everyday! Unit 1 sets you up very nicely for Year 12 English Language, so I would really recommend paying attention for the first couple of months in Year 11! After this, you learn about Child Language Acquisition, and the various theories about how humans learn to communicate.

Unit 2: We learn about the development of English across time, which ye olde languages influenced English, as well as reading through and analysing texts from as long ago as 500 ACE! It's so fun to see what English used to look like, and how we progressed to Modern English today! Then, we finish with looking at International Englishes, such as our English speaking friends in Jamaica, Singapore, South Africa, and more! We talk about accents, different words that people use, and how all of these variations came to exist!

From speaking with other past and current Lang students, generally Year 11 SACs are assessed through short answer questions, as well as perhaps one or two essays throughout the year. As far as English subjects go, pretty low effort in regards to SAC prep and answering SAC questions effectively. So I'm sure you would smash it!

Then on to Year 12 (which I found so so interesting and exciting! If you think the year 11 course sounded glamorous, just you wait)...

Unit 3: Unit 3 is all about informality and formality. Why do we speak more informally to some people, but more formally to others? How does our degree of formality affect other people? We get to read texts from all over Australia, from Facebook pages to podcasts, newspaper clippings to conversations between friends. All of it is relevant and all of it is exciting!

Unit 4: Unit 4 is all about Australian English and our cultural identity. We debate about the Australian accent, Australia's history, as well as look to the future of our national identity. Then, we talk about personal identity, and ask questions like: How does language reflect who I am? How does the language I use reflect my interests, friends, family, cultural background, my gender, etc.? If you like any humanities subjects or Psychology, Eng Lang would work for you perfectly (- with that being said, of course you don't have to do those subjects to still enjoy and do well in Eng Lang)!

I think that Eng Lang is the most practical English subject to do in VCE - I graduated 10 months ago and I still implement my skills from English Language on an everyday basis! Further, it is so interesting hearing other people's ideas and uses of language. You learn so much about Australia as an English speaking country, and I think that it really opens your eyes to why language is so so important to our society. I learnt that language can genuinely influence our values and morals, and I think that something that carries that much weight deserves a whole subject dedicated to it!

I hope that that has convinced you to give Eng Lang a shot! Eng Lang was definitely one of my favourite subjects and I want everyone else to enjoy it too!

Good luck with subject selection and I hope that this has helped!  8) :o 8)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: cap78 on October 09, 2019, 09:36:43 pm
Hi, I'm wondering what exam scores are needed to get a 43, 45 and/or 47 study score in English Language on the final exam.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: leonm19 on October 09, 2019, 10:21:09 pm
Following on from what cap78 said, I was also wondering what is the best way to study for the Eng Lang exam, and how many quotes and contemporary examples should we aim to remember?
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: 1vindex on October 11, 2019, 06:40:27 pm
Is the Broad Australian accent considered non-standard English, or more like an extreme in the continuum of standard English?
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: nianid on October 14, 2019, 06:26:38 pm
Hey guys I have a questions about contemporary examples.
Is it suitable to use contemporary examples from 2018 or do they all have to be from 2019? Thanks!
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Seamus Wong on October 14, 2019, 06:40:14 pm
Hey guys I have a questions about contemporary examples.
Is it suitable to use contemporary examples from 2018 or do they all have to be from 2019? Thanks!

My teacher says to use 2019 examples only and only use late 2018 examples if you have to.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Seamus Wong on October 14, 2019, 06:48:37 pm
Is the Broad Australian accent considered non-standard English, or more like an extreme in the continuum of standard English?

Nothing non-standard about the broad accent.
Speakers of the broad accent are likely to employ non-standard language features however
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: KiNSKi01 on October 22, 2019, 10:49:46 pm
Yo anyone got some recent examples of call-out culture/cancel culture which can be linked to discrim lang (and also linked to to e-lang as a result of social media)?
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: AngelWings on October 24, 2019, 05:24:12 pm
Yo anyone got some recent examples of call-out culture/cancel culture which can be linked to discrim lang (and also linked to to e-lang as a result of social media)?
I’m pretty sure there’ll be some linguistic gold from the whole James Charles/ Tatiana Westbrook situation earlier this year. Not only was it an example of cancel culture, but it was also very prevalent on social media, particularly on YouTube.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Seamus Wong on October 25, 2019, 09:12:15 am
I’m pretty sure there’ll be some linguistic gold from the whole James Charles/ Tatiana Westbrook situation earlier this year. Not only was it an example of cancel culture, but it was also very prevalent on social media, particularly on YouTube.

examiners wont like u cos it aint in the Australian context
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Darool on October 25, 2019, 05:31:14 pm
Hello. I was just wondering if this (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ToBdcRGsqr8​) would be a good example for how language links with identity? It also shows how a person who does not identify with the group can still act like they do..?

Although it's not in the Australian context, the idea and jargon they use should still apply worldwide.,, i think

Thank you :)
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: AngelWings on October 25, 2019, 06:39:44 pm
Yo anyone got some recent examples of call-out culture/cancel culture which can be linked to discrim lang (and also linked to to e-lang as a result of social media)?
examiners wont like u cos it aint in the Australian context
Another example could also be the very recent Michael Leunig (famous Australian cartoonist) situation that happened yesterday, where the cartoonist drew attention to women’s usage of phones in his work. Leunig has been described as “misogynistic” over it amongst other things. The language used  both in the cartoon and in response to it might be of interest to current Eng Lang students: link here
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: KiNSKi01 on October 25, 2019, 09:53:34 pm
Another example could also be the very recent Michael Leunig (famous Australian cartoonist) situation that happened yesterday, where the cartoonist drew attention to women’s usage of phones in his work. Leunig has been described as “misogynistic” over it amongst other things. The language used  both in the cartoon and in response to it might be of interest to current Eng Lang students: link here

Ooh yes that's gold

Unsure what to really quote from the article tho
In terms of linguistics, what is the big draw away from it
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: AngelWings on October 26, 2019, 05:12:32 pm
Ooh yes that's gold

Unsure what to really quote from the article tho
In terms of linguistics, what is the big draw away from it
To turn the tables a bit on you, what do you think? People could interpret the cartoon and its resulting backlash in several different ways.

It’s been a good while since I did Eng Lang (read: 2014), so I’m nowhere near updated on the current study design and I’m super rusty, therefore, please take my interpretation of the above situation with a grain of salt.

Anyway, from a linguistic standpoint, in my opinion, I’d be pinpointing at two places mostly:
1. the cartoon itself - how Leunig mimics how mothers talk to/ about their babies e.g. “Mummy” and “bubby”, and how the lines in the comic’s caption were rhyming, as if it were a children’s story. (You could probably link this to identity and context or something.)
2. the resulting reactions, especially Clementine Ford’s (a known feminist writer) immediate linguistic choice of swear words (which she usually does unapologetically; her Twitter profile includes “foul mouthed” in the description) and Mary Leunig’s (Michael’s sister) use of Australian slang “having a go at women”, as well as stating that her brother uses the technique of “feminist baiting” to stir up controversy (as seen from link here).
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Jimmmy on October 26, 2019, 09:14:18 pm
@AngelWings; I've always found the 'reactions' to a variety of non-PC language (eg. Izzy Folau earlier this year) seem to be more reflective of the attitudes to varieties and views of taboo than original examples. Do you think it's fair to bring up these 'responses' (eg. Clementine Ford's labelling of Leuning as a '...gronk') as good pieces of evidence for essay topics requiring 'the views of Australian society on discriminatory, taboo, or socially divisive language'?

Likewise, do you think you could call Leunig's cartoon 'formal'?
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: AngelWings on October 27, 2019, 03:35:25 pm
@AngelWings; I've always found the 'reactions' to a variety of non-PC language (eg. Izzy Folau earlier this year) seem to be more reflective of the attitudes to varieties and views of taboo than original examples. Do you think it's fair to bring up these 'responses' (eg. Clementine Ford's labelling of Leuning as a '...gronk') as good pieces of evidence for essay topics requiring 'the views of Australian society on discriminatory, taboo, or socially divisive language'?
As I said, it’s been a while since I did Eng Lang and that area was a smaller aspect of the study design in my time, if my memory serves me correctly, so I might be on the wrong track entirely. The main part right now is probably to agree with the current study design and what VCAA assessors are after, so if they don’t really agree that responses should be included, then simply don’t risk it during the exam and, instead, we look for a different example.

I brought this example up purely because I thought it might be helpful, although I was unsure of its usefulness to begin with. Upon re-reading my reply above, my interpretation seems to cross between a language analysis for English and contemporary examples for Eng Lang Section C, so... sorry for leading you all on.

Feel free to disregard or interpret the linguistics of that example as you wish. 

Do I think it’s fair? Maybe - in a pinch. I’m not so sure...

Summary: Depends on whether VCAA assessors like using responses, which last I heard wasn’t exactly ideal and should be resorted to as back up. It’s more than likely my interpretation and this example wasn’t as helpful as I’d imagined it to be, so use the above with your utmost caution.

Likewise, do you think you could call Leunig's cartoon 'formal'?
Honestly, I’m not 100% sure myself. I’m generally more inclined to say informal language, but formal context (as it’s published in The Age), but after those mistakes above, I’m not so sure of myself.
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: KiNSKi01 on October 28, 2019, 05:57:24 pm
hey I'm confused about what lexical repetition exactly means

Does it mean repetition of a specific lexeme or does it mean repetition of lexemes which share similar semantics (thus making it a feature of coherency be reflecting consistency in FLICCC)?
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: nerdynajla0605 on December 09, 2019, 07:01:30 pm
Hello! :)

I'm going into year 12 next year, and I've decided to drop English for English Language, thus I'll be doing English Language without the 1/2...  :'( Because of that, I'm planning to do tutoring for it, but I don't know which company I should do... I'm considering tutesmart, connect education, or private. If you have experience from taking English Language tutoring from any of the three, please tell me your opinions and if you recommend them!  :D :D :D

Also... What should I do this holiday to prepare for it? ;D ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
Post by: Bri MT on December 09, 2019, 07:22:35 pm
Hey! :)

I did eng lang without units 1&2 and found learning all of the metalanguage over the holidays to be really helpful. Aside from that I also read through some notes/books but learning metalanguage was the most useful part imo.

I didn't do any tutoring in my VCE so I can't comment too much on that