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August 02, 2021, 03:51:50 am

Author Topic: VCE Biology Question Thread  (Read 2346875 times)  Share 

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Chocolatepistachio

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13515 on: June 20, 2021, 11:35:46 am »
0
Would it be wrong If you said Down syndrome was caused by a mutation

Is the allele for blood group O I^i I^i or just ii or are both fine

Sine

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13516 on: June 20, 2021, 01:24:37 pm »
+5
Would it be wrong If you said Down syndrome was caused by a mutation

Is the allele for blood group O I^i I^i or just ii or are both fine
For your first question yes i think that would be wrong since it is an entire chromosomal abnormality not specific nucleotide base changes. Also the primary cause is usually abnormal cell division.

For your second question the O blood group ii is usually fine for the genotype

emonerd

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13517 on: June 20, 2021, 02:49:33 pm »
0
Hi! Just wondering if anyone knows regarding this study design dot point:
 - significant changes in life forms in Earth’s geological history including the rise of multicellular organisms, animals
on land, the first flowering plants and mammals
How much detail do students have to go into with memorising the different periods and eras? Is it just to know which ones correspond to the first flower plants and mammals?
Thanks!
2019 -Biology
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Owlbird83

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13518 on: June 20, 2021, 04:14:57 pm »
+6
Hi! Just wondering if anyone knows regarding this study design dot point:
 - significant changes in life forms in Earth’s geological history including the rise of multicellular organisms, animals
on land, the first flowering plants and mammals
How much detail do students have to go into with memorising the different periods and eras? Is it just to know which ones correspond to the first flower plants and mammals?
Thanks!

Hi emonerd!

I found this in VCAA's biology FAQs that might help answer your question:
Quote
Question: Are students required to know dates for the changes in life forms in Earth’s geological history, and which specific life forms should be considered?
Answer: No, although specific dates are not required students should understand geological
time is divided into sections, for example eras and periods.
Students should understand that Earth’s history can be represented on a geological time scale
as a ‘calendar’ of chronological events: different kinds of organisms do not appear randomly but appear in a constant order as the law of fossil succession. The fossil record shows the changes that have occurred in the types of organisms living over time.
Question: Are students required to understand why biodiversity has changed over time?
Answer: Yes, students should have a general understanding that major changes in Earth’s conditions such as available land masses (plate tectonics), atmospheric composition, temperature, climate and biodiversity have consequences. For example, the appearance of multicellular animals in the fossil record can be related to build up of oxygen in the atmosphere derived from photosynthetic cyanobacteria. As another example, flowering plants (angiosperms), birds, and mammals rapidly radiated into niches left vacant by the extinction of the dinosaurs.
I think it's more important to know the order major organisms mentioned in the dot point evolved than the specific times/names of periods.
2018: Biology
2019: Chemistry, Physics, Math Methods, English, Japanese
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Chocolatepistachio

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13519 on: June 21, 2021, 08:05:06 pm »
0
Antidiuretic hormone (ADH) affects only a small number of cells in the body because:
A only it’s target cells are exposed to ADH.
B only it’s target cells contain ADH receptors
C it is unable to enter non target cells
D non target cells hydrolyse ADH

Would this be b

Billuminati

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13520 on: June 21, 2021, 08:12:47 pm »
+4
Antidiuretic hormone (ADH) affects only a small number of cells in the body because:
A only it’s target cells are exposed to ADH.
B only it’s target cells contain ADH receptors
C it is unable to enter non target cells
D non target cells hydrolyse ADH

Would this be b

Yep, only distal renal tubule and collecting duct epithelial cells express vasopressin receptors.
VCE 2016-2018

2017: Biology [38], Further Maths [44]

2018: Methods [37], French [38], Chem [40], English [44]

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2019- : Bachelor of Biomedical Science at Monash (Scholars), minoring in Chemistry

Chocolatepistachio

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13521 on: June 22, 2021, 06:30:57 pm »
0
In a chemical reaction, 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate + ADP yields 3-phosphoglycerate plus ATP. What is the delta G for this reaction?
A greater than zero
B equal to zero
C less than zero
D cannot be determined

Why is this c can someone explain

Sine

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13522 on: June 22, 2021, 07:11:51 pm »
+4
In a chemical reaction, 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate + ADP yields 3-phosphoglycerate plus ATP. What is the delta G for this reaction?
A greater than zero
B equal to zero
C less than zero
D cannot be determined

Why is this c can someone explain
2 ways to solve this quesiton

1) Have memorised which glycolysis reactions are favourable and which ones aren't (A delta G < 0 means the reaction is favourable and occurs spontaneously). Not expected of anyone in highschool.
2) Understand that when ATP production occurs in glycolysis ADP + Pi -> ATP it is linked to a highly favourable reaction (delta G <0) resulting in a overall delta G < 0. for then conversions involving ATP production.

Chocolatepistachio

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13523 on: June 23, 2021, 10:24:38 pm »
+1
The model for DNA structure put forward by Watson, crick and Wilkins can explain many characteristics of the genetic material. However, it fails to help explain:
A why certain characteristics are passed on from generation to generation without change
B how DNA determines the order of nucleotides in mRNA
C why different proteins are active at different times in a cell
D how DNA molecules replicate themselves

Would this be c

Billuminati

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13524 on: June 24, 2021, 02:03:38 am »
+2
The model for DNA structure put forward by Watson, crick and Wilkins can explain many characteristics of the genetic material. However, it fails to help explain:
A why certain characteristics are passed on from generation to generation without change
B how DNA determines the order of nucleotides in mRNA
C why different proteins are active at different times in a cell
D how DNA molecules replicate themselves

Would this be c

Yes it's C. Although you know the structure of DNA from their model (which they stole/plagiarised from a lady), it doesn't tell you how gene expression is regulated by transcription factors and chromatin remodelling proteins.
VCE 2016-2018

2017: Biology [38], Further Maths [44]

2018: Methods [37], French [38], Chem [40], English [44]

ATAR: 98.1

2019- : Bachelor of Biomedical Science at Monash (Scholars), minoring in Chemistry

Bluebird

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13525 on: June 25, 2021, 12:56:15 pm »
0
Hi AN,

What exactly does it mean when a caspase 'cleaves' specific proteins?

Thank you

Billuminati

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13526 on: June 25, 2021, 01:08:44 pm »
+2
Hi AN,

What exactly does it mean when a caspase 'cleaves' specific proteins?

Thank you
Cleave= a molecule making a cut in another molecule. The effector caspases (eg caspase 3) which directly destroy the cell by cleaving its proteins etc are actually activated by an initiator caspase (caspase 8 or 9) cleaving them.
VCE 2016-2018

2017: Biology [38], Further Maths [44]

2018: Methods [37], French [38], Chem [40], English [44]

ATAR: 98.1

2019- : Bachelor of Biomedical Science at Monash (Scholars), minoring in Chemistry

Bluebird

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13527 on: June 25, 2021, 01:58:43 pm »
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Cleave= a molecule making a cut in another molecule. The effector caspases (eg caspase 3) which directly destroy the cell by cleaving its proteins etc are actually activated by an initiator caspase (caspase 8 or 9) cleaving them.

Thank you :)

Chocolatepistachio

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13528 on: June 26, 2021, 10:29:16 pm »
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What is the predicted energy yield of the Krebs cycle per molecule of glucose in eukaryotic cells? Consider that 1 NADH yields 3 atp and 1 FADH2 yields 2ATP
A 2 ATP
B 24 atp
C 18 ATP
D 30 ATP

Would this be a but if 1NADH  yields 3 then wouldn’t it be 20

Billuminati

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13529 on: June 27, 2021, 04:16:03 am »
+3
What is the predicted energy yield of the Krebs cycle per molecule of glucose in eukaryotic cells? Consider that 1 NADH yields 3 atp and 1 FADH2 yields 2ATP
A 2 ATP
B 24 atp
C 18 ATP
D 30 ATP

Would this be a but if 1NADH  yields 3 then wouldn’t it be 20

You're correct that it's only 2 ATP. Remember that glycolysis only produces a net of 2 ATP while it generates NADH as well, the ATP generated by NADH are attributed to the electron transport chain because that's where NADH deposit the H+s for a proton gradient to spin the the ATP synthase turbine. FYI, Kreb's cycle doesn't generate ATP directly, it actually generates GTP which is converted to ATP.
VCE 2016-2018

2017: Biology [38], Further Maths [44]

2018: Methods [37], French [38], Chem [40], English [44]

ATAR: 98.1

2019- : Bachelor of Biomedical Science at Monash (Scholars), minoring in Chemistry