Login | Register
Enrol now for our new online tutoring program. Learn from the best tutors. Get amazing results. Learn more.

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

November 29, 2021, 01:42:51 am

Author Topic: VCE Biology Question Thread  (Read 2605585 times)  Share 

0 Members and 3 Guests are viewing this topic.

kayla2005

  • Fresh Poster
  • *
  • Posts: 3
  • Respect: 0
Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13695 on: September 05, 2021, 06:01:48 pm »
0
Thankyou so much!!! ^^

Chocolatepistachio

  • Science Games: Silver
  • Forum Obsessive
  • ***
  • Posts: 450
  • Respect: +51
Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13696 on: September 06, 2021, 04:20:15 pm »
0
In what part of atps structure is the readily usable energy stored?
Is it only in the last phosphate bond

Acegtr

  • Adventurer
  • *
  • Posts: 16
  • Respect: 0
Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13697 on: September 07, 2021, 04:58:42 pm »
0
is there a difference between gene cloning and therapy?

Rose34

  • Trendsetter
  • **
  • Posts: 127
  • Respect: +2
Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13698 on: September 07, 2021, 08:50:44 pm »
0
Hi there!

I was wondering what effective strategies bio students use to get really high marks. My strategy is taking notes and doing questions, but that does not seem to be effective and especially for taking notes. I feel like taking notes is useless and just a waste of time, so I was thinking of just studying from the tetxbook and highlighting. Has anyone tried that method? I mean of not taking notes and just highlighting and memorizing from the textbook?
What methods students use for bio? I really want to improve my marks because my aim is to get into medical school so getting really high marks for bio is really important for me

Thanks in advance!

tiredandstressed

  • MOTM: DEC 20
  • Forum Obsessive
  • ***
  • Posts: 231
  • pretty without the r (he/him)
  • Respect: +160
Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13699 on: September 07, 2021, 10:59:15 pm »
+3
Hi there!

I was wondering what effective strategies bio students use to get really high marks. My strategy is taking notes and doing questions, but that does not seem to be effective and especially for taking notes. I feel like taking notes is useless and just a waste of time, so I was thinking of just studying from the tetxbook and highlighting. Has anyone tried that method? I mean of not taking notes and just highlighting and memorizing from the textbook?
What methods students use for bio? I really want to improve my marks because my aim is to get into medical school so getting really high marks for bio is really important for me

Thanks in advance!
Here's some other revision stratergies
- Mindmaps to show logical links between study design points/areas of study (without your notes for extra spice)
- Design your own exam questions!; sounds hard but once you have done some practice exams use the key knowledge to design some challenging exam questions (good for study groups, but can work individually!)
- One-page activity; with no notes get a blank piece of paper and write a topic as a title (e.g. immunity) and write everything you can down (good way to see the gaps in your knowledge)
- Read examiner reports; see what VCCA comments on that students did not do well (likely will be asked again) familiarise yourself with the structure of VCCA dot points for answers, and incorporate a similar style in your own answers
- PRACTICE EXAMS really put an effort to refine your section b to maximise your study score
 
VCE '17-'18
2017: Biology, Psychology
2018: English, HHD, Chemistry, Methods
2019-21: Bachelor of Biomedicine (Physiology) @ UoM
My guides:
A quick guide to language and argument analysis
HHD sample questions
HHD 2019 Comprehensive examiner report analysis

Rose34

  • Trendsetter
  • **
  • Posts: 127
  • Respect: +2
Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13700 on: September 08, 2021, 10:20:50 am »
0
Here's some other revision stratergies
- Mindmaps to show logical links between study design points/areas of study (without your notes for extra spice)
- Design your own exam questions!; sounds hard but once you have done some practice exams use the key knowledge to design some challenging exam questions (good for study groups, but can work individually!)
- One-page activity; with no notes get a blank piece of paper and write a topic as a title (e.g. immunity) and write everything you can down (good way to see the gaps in your knowledge)
- Read examiner reports; see what VCCA comments on that students did not do well (likely will be asked again) familiarise yourself with the structure of VCCA dot points for answers, and incorporate a similar style in your own answers
- PRACTICE EXAMS really put an effort to refine your section b to maximise your study score

Thank you I will try those tips!

Bluebird

  • Trailblazer
  • *
  • Posts: 28
  • Respect: 0
Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13701 on: September 08, 2021, 04:10:00 pm »
0
can someone explain the difference between a chromosome mutation and a block mutation?

lm21074

  • MOTM: JAN 19
  • Victorian Moderator
  • Forum Leader
  • *****
  • Posts: 530
  • Respect: +553
Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13702 on: September 08, 2021, 04:32:58 pm »
+7
can someone explain the difference between a chromosome mutation and a block mutation?
My understanding is that block mutations are gene mutations that result in large sections of a chromosome changing whereas chromosomal mutations affect entire chromosomes - for instance, aneuploidy (too many or too few individual chromosomes) or polyploidy (extra set of chromosomes).

Edited to add this:
is there a difference between gene cloning and therapy?
Gene cloning is making exact copies of a specific gene whilst gene therapy is an application of cloning that involves inserting a functional gene into cells that have a missing or faulty gene. There are differences in the ways the processes work.

Gene therapy uses a vector to carry the normal gene, which is either injected into the patient (in vivo) or cells, such as bone marrow stem cells, are removed from the patient and a vector containing the normal gene is added to the cells in a laboratory (in vitro method).

Gene cloning involves extracting the gene of interest using restriction enzymes (you can also make DNA using reverse transcriptase from mRNA), copying the DNA (using PCR), making a recombinant plasmid (gene of interest is inserted into plasmid) and bacterial transformation occurs (basically a plasmid is inserted into bacterium).



Please correct me if I'm wrong here!
« Last Edit: September 08, 2021, 07:57:02 pm by lm21074 »

wingdings2791

  • Trendsetter
  • **
  • Posts: 102
  • I'm going back to the start
  • Respect: +82
Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13703 on: September 14, 2021, 10:09:32 pm »
+5
Hey, could someone help me with this question. Would it be that histones wrap around DNA. But I'm not sure exactly why they do it and why needed.

How do histones proteins help in the coiling of DNA?

Thanks

Hi biology1234,
You're on the right track, but it's actually the other way around- DNA wraps around histones.
What they are: Histones are small proteins that DNA wraps around in order compact the DNA into a smaller space, somewhat like sewing thread on a spool.
Why and how: There is a massive amount of genetic information to be stored in a not very large nucleus, so it's a matter of efficient storage. The histone proteins are positively charged, so they form ionic attractions to the negatively charged DNA phosphate backbone and hence, strong bonds are formed between histones and DNA.

Hope this helps!
2019- Chinese SL [42]
2020- Biology [43] Music Performance [49]
2021- Chemistry, Methods, English Language

Acegtr

  • Adventurer
  • *
  • Posts: 16
  • Respect: 0
Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13704 on: September 20, 2021, 04:28:10 pm »
0
Are there any benefits that In Vivo gene therapy has over Ex vivo? Or what's the purpose of In Vivo gene therapy if Ex vivo is safer? Thanks in advance!

letde

  • Fresh Poster
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • Respect: 0
Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13705 on: September 21, 2021, 12:58:12 pm »
0
Hey could someone please help me out with this question. For the bio exam would you recommend briefly studying about the Homo naledi case study or in detail? This is related to how biologists can often disagree when interpreting the human fossil records.
I've seen quite a few questions regarding Homo naledi in the practice exams.

Thanks :)

valjaybj

  • Trailblazer
  • *
  • Posts: 31
  • Respect: 0
Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13706 on: September 21, 2021, 04:28:57 pm »
+3
Hey could someone please help me out with this question. For the bio exam would you recommend briefly studying about the Homo naledi case study or in detail? This is related to how biologists can often disagree when interpreting the human fossil records.
I've seen quite a few questions regarding Homo naledi in the practice exams.

Thanks :)

Hi! I think it's definitely important to understand that the human fossil record is a classification scheme that is open to interpretations (this is explicitly mentioned in the study design), but a brief study of Homo naledi should be enough. If there's a question about H. naledi they will provide you with context. In saying that, if you feel more confident by having a look in more detail then go for it! But I don't think it's a necessity. Hope this helps! :)

Acegtr

  • Adventurer
  • *
  • Posts: 16
  • Respect: 0
Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13707 on: September 25, 2021, 04:14:18 pm »
0
Hi,
When comparing DNA sequences, especially mtDNA, why is a higher mutation rate better? My thinking is that if there are more differences over time, how would it make mtDNA better than normal DNA if it has a higher mutation rate? I get that it's only passed down maternally, and this could help in tracing, but wouldn't a higher mutation rate still make it harder to relate individuals?

Thanks in advance!

specimen

  • Adventurer
  • *
  • Posts: 12
  • Respect: +1
Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13708 on: September 25, 2021, 06:11:04 pm »
+5
Hi,
When comparing DNA sequences, especially mtDNA, why is a higher mutation rate better? My thinking is that if there are more differences over time, how would it make mtDNA better than normal DNA if it has a higher mutation rate? I get that it's only passed down maternally, and this could help in tracing, but wouldn't a higher mutation rate still make it harder to relate individuals?

Thanks in advance!

A higher mutation rate can be used to find the relationship between closer related species. For example if two species have recently diverged then looking at the differences in their nuclear DNA may not be useful as there may have not been enough mutations accumulated over the short time period, whereas there will be more mutations accumulated in their mtDNA which can give the scientists a better understanding of their relationship and when exactly they diverged.

For species which have diverged much earlier, using nuclear DNA more useful.


hamnafahmi

  • Fresh Poster
  • *
  • Posts: 3
  • Respect: 0
Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13709 on: September 29, 2021, 10:49:42 am »
0
Does anyone know when the new study design is releasing for 3/4 Biology? I just want to familiarise myself with the topics before the next year starts.