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June 25, 2021, 08:36:09 am

Author Topic: VCE Methods Question Thread!  (Read 3453954 times)  Share 

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ABB0005

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Re: VCE Methods Question Thread!
« Reply #19125 on: April 11, 2021, 08:16:36 pm »
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Anyone know how people who make online bound references print and bind them for the exam?

ArtyDreams

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Re: VCE Methods Question Thread!
« Reply #19126 on: April 11, 2021, 09:36:28 pm »
+4
Anyone know how people who make online bound references print and bind them for the exam?

I've seen people doing it on various platforms such as Microsoft Word, OneNote, Noteability, etc!
You can get them binded at places such as Officeworks.

arnavg2207

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Re: VCE Methods Question Thread!
« Reply #19127 on: April 13, 2021, 02:40:53 pm »
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Hey guys,
Just wondering what the best way to find the range of a composite function is. Do you need to graph it?
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fun_jirachi

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Re: VCE Methods Question Thread!
« Reply #19128 on: April 13, 2021, 08:10:14 pm »
+4
This is a tough question to answer (simply because of the scope, not because it's vague or in any other way a bad question!). So I have some questions to pose in turn:

- What would you usually do to find the range of a composite function? Note that strictly there is no real best way (as long the answer is correct and it works quickly and accurately enough for you).
- For your method, what optimisations would you like to make? Are there any examples that demonstrate why your method may not work as well as you'd like?
- Are there any concepts about composite functions you're struggling to understand?

To answer your last question, you don't always need to graph it. If on inspection the graph is easy enough to visualise or if the range of the inner function maintains set equality with the domain of the outer function, then you shouldn't need to.
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Bluebird

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Re: VCE Methods Question Thread!
« Reply #19129 on: May 10, 2021, 10:41:20 pm »
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Can someone give me a few clues on how to solve this problem? I don't really know how to tackle it :(

fun_jirachi

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Re: VCE Methods Question Thread!
« Reply #19130 on: May 10, 2021, 10:52:50 pm »
+1
1. If a polynomial \(P(x)\) is divisible by another polynomial \(Q(x)\), by definition, the result must also be another polynomial (say, \(R(x)\)). We can write this as \(P(x) = Q(x)R(x)\).
2. Note that if \(P(x) = 0\), then one of \(Q(x)\) or \(R(x)\) must also be zero by the null factor theorem. Conversely, if \(x\) is a factor of \(Q(x)\), it must also be a factor of \(P(x)\).

This should be enough to get you thinking a bit - let us know if you get stuck :)

EDIT: you can technically use other methods like equating coefficients or polynomial division (don't do it, really.) Equating coefficients may be helpful down the track (especially if the quotient happens to be linear, which it is in this case). Setting up this kind of thinking is important, but having another go at the same question using equating coefficients might be something you want to think about.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2021, 10:55:52 pm by fun_jirachi »
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Corey King

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Re: VCE Methods Question Thread!
« Reply #19131 on: May 19, 2021, 09:59:09 pm »
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Hey guys,
Does anyone know why the coefficients of the variables in standard form of a linear equation have to be integers?
If you plug in an x value, and get the same y value no matter the multiples of the coefficients you use, why does this matter?
Also,
Why does the coefficient of the x value have to be positive?

fun_jirachi

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Re: VCE Methods Question Thread!
« Reply #19132 on: May 19, 2021, 10:05:57 pm »
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You don't have to have integers as coefficients, it's just nicer to work with. Why would you want to deal with fractions and decimals when you can deal with integers instead? It's quicker almost all of the time. Feel free to use non-integers, but it's harder for markers to verify and you to use in further computation (as I said before), especially in multi-step questions that are common in high school exams.

Not quite sure what you mean by your second question; perhaps you can provide an example that shows what you are asking about?

Third question: no, it doesn't have to be. Similar answer to the first question.

Hope this helps :)
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Corey King

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Re: VCE Methods Question Thread!
« Reply #19133 on: May 20, 2021, 10:47:19 am »
+1
You don't have to have integers as coefficients, it's just nicer to work with. Why would you want to deal with fractions and decimals when you can deal with integers instead? It's quicker almost all of the time. Feel free to use non-integers, but it's harder for markers to verify and you to use in further computation (as I said before), especially in multi-step questions that are common in high school exams.

Not quite sure what you mean by your second question; perhaps you can provide an example that shows what you are asking about?

Third question: no, it doesn't have to be. Similar answer to the first question.

Hope this helps :)

The second bit was just about the first question, which you answered. Thanks :)
All these online resources state that these values could not be fractions etc, so weird. Thanks Jirachi!

Samueliscool223

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Re: VCE Methods Question Thread!
« Reply #19134 on: May 25, 2021, 01:56:18 pm »
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for addition of ordinates for circular functions, how exactly do you know where the maximum and minimum points are for functions w different periods?

Samueliscool223

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Re: VCE Methods Question Thread!
« Reply #19135 on: May 25, 2021, 01:57:14 pm »
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for addition of ordinates for circular functions, how exactly do you know where the maximum and minimum points are for functions w different periods?

Samueliscool223

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Re: VCE Methods Question Thread!
« Reply #19136 on: May 25, 2021, 02:03:29 pm »
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for addition of ordinates for circular functions, how exactly do you know where the maximum and minimum points are for functions w different periods?

Samueliscool223

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Re: VCE Methods Question Thread!
« Reply #19137 on: May 25, 2021, 02:04:37 pm »
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lagged out apologies for repeated message

fun_jirachi

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Re: VCE Methods Question Thread!
« Reply #19138 on: May 25, 2021, 04:05:27 pm »
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Might be easier to delete the duplicate posts instead of making another post, in future :)

Some food for thought:
- How would you find the maximum and minimum of a single function \(f(x)\)?
- Is the sum of the functions still periodic? How can you potentially use this result to find local maximums and minimums?


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Chocolatepistachio

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Re: VCE Methods Question Thread!
« Reply #19139 on: June 06, 2021, 10:19:24 pm »
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isn't the minimum turning point just the coordinates of the vertex not 2,-3