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December 06, 2021, 12:33:55 pm

Author Topic: VCE Biology Question Thread  (Read 2621380 times)  Share 

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KKKKKKKK

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13725 on: October 10, 2021, 11:43:16 pm »
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It is the position on a chromosome where you would be able to find a particular gene.

Thankyou @K.Smithy

biology1234

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13726 on: October 11, 2021, 06:09:23 pm »
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A normal womans chromosomes are homologous. Is the same true for a normal male?

Would it be no, as the male has a x and a  y chromsone whereas female has two x chromsones



It is the position on a chromosome where you would be able to find a particular gene.


In relation to this question, since the gene locus is on the x -chromosone. Does this affect its inheritance patterns

mod edit: merged double post ~Owlbird83
« Last Edit: October 11, 2021, 09:14:20 pm by Owlbird83 »

Billuminati

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13727 on: October 12, 2021, 03:03:34 am »
+5
A normal womans chromosomes are homologous. Is the same true for a normal male?

Would it be no, as the male has a x and a  y chromsone whereas female has two x chromsones




In relation to this question, since the gene locus is on the x -chromosone. Does this affect its inheritance patterns

mod edit: merged double post ~Owlbird83

Women can be homozygotes or heterozygotes for a particular trait, however males are only hemizygous. With regards to whether or not the X and Y chromosomes are homologous, the answer is yes and no. There are 2 sections in the p arm telomere and q arm telomere of both the X and Y chromosomes called pseudoautosomal regions that actually cross over during meiosis, despite the X and Y chromosomes having very different shapes. Note that for reasons still unknown, this does not occur in male fruit flies.

And yes, genes located on the X-chromosome (known as X-linked genes) have different phenotypic ratios compared to autosomal ones. X-linked recessive conditions disproportionately affect males, whereas X-linked dominant conditions disproportionately affect females, have a think about why by drawing a few Punnett squares
« Last Edit: October 12, 2021, 03:05:53 am by Billuminati »
VCE 2016-2018

2017: Biology [38], Further Maths [44]

2018: Methods [37], French [38], Chem [40], English [44]

UMAT: 56/43/80, 57th percentile (LLLLOOOOOOOOOLLLLLLLL)

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2019- : Bachelor of Biomedical Science at Monash (Scholars), minoring in Chemistry

GAMSAT September 2021: 65/67/86, 76 overall (98th percentile)

Chocolatepistachio

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13728 on: October 12, 2021, 09:24:53 pm »
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if someone could help with this question

biology1234

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13729 on: October 13, 2021, 07:17:45 pm »
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Explain why the cells of the gastrula are considered to be adult stem cells

Owlbird83

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13730 on: October 13, 2021, 08:30:02 pm »
+5
if someone could help with this question

I think A, B, C would represent the time when the population growth is not limited by the availability of resources as the population continues rising. However, maybe you could also argue it's only A and B, since in C the growth seems to be slowing down suggesting it's beginning to reach some resource limits. edit: i'm leaning to just A and B, let me know if you have a different opinion!

Explain why the cells of the gastrula are considered to be adult stem cells
To answer this question you might want to consider the characteristics of the different types of stem cells.
hint
Totipotent stem cells: can differentiate into all cell types in body and placenta
Pluripotent stem cells: can differentiate all the cell types in the body (aka embryonic stem cells)
Multipotent stem cells: can differentiate into only a couple of cell types (aka adult stem cells)

At the beginning of development we need stem cells that are able to differentiate into all different cell types, but once a certain stage of development is reached, this isn't necessary anymore, (therefore adult/multipotent stem cells only differentiate into a couple of cell types).

Spoiler
If the cells of the gastrula are considered adult stem cells it would be because they can differentiate into multiple (but not all) cell types
hope this helps!
« Last Edit: October 13, 2021, 08:38:19 pm by Owlbird83 »
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Corey King

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13731 on: October 14, 2021, 02:22:58 pm »
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Hey guys,
I was just wondering why, during anaerobic respiration, the body doesn't keep pyruvate and store it for later use. Why is it necessary to turn it into lactic acid / ethanol?
Thanks,
Corey

Corey King

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13732 on: October 16, 2021, 01:30:40 am »
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Hey guys,
Would students get given marks for answers that don't line up perfectly with what the examiners report says?
https://gyazo.com/96aae8961b39af2e779679448db0ce10
I already knew what is written in the examiners report, but its such a pain to guess exactly what the examiners expect you to say for non-specific questions.
https://gyazo.com/c02900b00c6082ebc462eef519b26e1e

Lymphhh

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13733 on: October 16, 2021, 12:01:44 pm »
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Hey guys,
Would students get given marks for answers that don't line up perfectly with what the examiners report says?
https://gyazo.com/96aae8961b39af2e779679448db0ce10
I already knew what is written in the examiners report, but its such a pain to guess exactly what the examiners expect you to say for non-specific questions.
https://gyazo.com/c02900b00c6082ebc462eef519b26e1e

Hey, I think it really depends. For some questions I think they will definitely accept answers not on their report, given that they are reasonable. But for some question, certain key words and phrases are a must to get the mark.

If you look at the VCAA question you put a link too, you can see the state average is 0.9 ~ 1 / 2, with only 30% of the state getting all two marks. This likely implies to me that they were very strict and specific on what answers they accepted.

If you look at your answer for this question “To build proteins/ peptides from information from mRNA moelcules”. - i think this a bit vague and not specific enough.  TRNA doesn’t exactly build the peptide, it deposits specific amino acids to the ribosome as prescribed by the mRNA strands (via complementary base paring between tRNA anticodons and mRNA codons). 

If you look at your answer for the role of mRNA ; “To acts as a template for tRNA to transcribe from”, i also feel this isn’t specfic enough. TRNA doesn’t transcribe the mRNA strand i don’t think, it just deposits the amino acids required for polypetide production. - Remember this is translation not transcription. I would avoid using the term ‘transcribe’, when talking about tRNA molecules.    —-> So i think a better resposne could include:
   -> mRNA carries information of a particular gene to the ribosome, to allow for the production of the particualr protein
  -> mRNA provides the information for the specfic sequence of amino acids to produce a polypetide via the order of its codons.
 
I’m doing bio 3/4 this year too, so i only know as much as you know, so I can’t be sure if this is right. Hope it helps in some way doe :)
VCE :
2020: LOTE [40]
2021: Biology 3/4 [ ]
2022: Chem [ ], English [ ], Psychology [ ], Maths Meth [ ]

PhoenixxFire

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13734 on: October 16, 2021, 10:22:15 pm »
+5
Hey guys,
I was just wondering why, during anaerobic respiration, the body doesn't keep pyruvate and store it for later use. Why is it necessary to turn it into lactic acid / ethanol?
Thanks,
Corey
Hey,
During glycolysis, nad+ is turned into nadh. The later stages of anaerobic respiration turning pyruvate into lactic acid/ethanol turns the nadh back into nad+. Without nad+, you can't have glycolysis and the cell only has a limited amount so if it is all tied up as nadh and left as that it wouldn't be able to do any more glycolysis! The lactic acid/ethanol is just a way for the body to be able to convert it back to nad+ to be reused.
2019: B. Environment and Sustainability/B. Science @ ANU
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Lymphhh

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13735 on: October 19, 2021, 04:30:57 pm »
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Hey guys, i just needa lil help understanding and applying the term selection pressure.

According to VCAA, a selection pressure is a factor in an organisms environment that impacts its survival and reproductive success and removes unsuited individuals from the environment, or something like that. This includes things like predation, hunting, increase in climate temperature, etc right???

But I’m still struggling to understand the term in context. For example, for the question “What selection pressures are likely to have been improtant in the evoltuion of bipedalism initially?”, (biozone), the model answer was:
   -> “the selection pressures for bipedalism was most probably associated with provisioning, being able to collect and carry food is a major advantage”
   
What exactly does this mean 😭

Another Biozone question: “name two possible selection pressures acting on the human hand”.
The model answer: the need to manipulate objects and the abiltiy to form a fist and deliver a blow to an attacker”

— Again how is the need to do something a selction pressure?? I jsut can’t seem to get my head around this term and apply it.

Another question: TSSM 2019 biology exam Q7 f : “What selection pressure was applied to the algae?”
This question was about this algae species that was preyed upon by a single cellled flagellate. This flagellate can’t consume large cells, so the algae that was able to form loose clumps survived better in presence of the predator than those alage cells  living as a single cell.

So, in repose to what selction pressure is applied to alage, wouldn’t it be predation?

But the model answer was: “Avoiding been consumed”

If someone could help me understand this term, it would be great. I know I lowkey made it confusing
« Last Edit: October 19, 2021, 04:54:02 pm by Lymphhh »
VCE :
2020: LOTE [40]
2021: Biology 3/4 [ ]
2022: Chem [ ], English [ ], Psychology [ ], Maths Meth [ ]

Chocolatepistachio

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13736 on: October 22, 2021, 09:51:13 pm »
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if someone could help with this question

Lymphhh

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13737 on: October 23, 2021, 08:36:42 pm »
+1
if someone could help with this question

Hey,
I’m not too sure but i think the answer is C?? Idk

From the stem of the question we can see that the kelp perch uses the kelp to hide from predators such as kelp bass. As the kelp perch popaultion icnreases, the available spots for the kelp to hide decreases (limiting factor), making the kelp perch more visible to predators. Thus, this scenario is density-dependant. If you look at the graph you can see that proportional mortality increases with kelp perch density, which further hints its density dependant.

With this info, we can straight away eliminate option B and D  which implies this is density independent.

A -> ‘A’ wouldn’t make sense because why would a low kelp population lead to low availability of sheltering sites. It’s rather large kelp popualtion which would lead to low number of available sheltering sites.

So c is correct??

Not too sure :(

Just in case:
  Density dependant factors -> factors that affect a certain popautlion depending on tis density. (eg: food availability.  as popualtion density increase, available food will be consumed much more rapidly, so available food and other resources will become limited) i think??

  Density indepedanat factors -> Factors usually abiotic that influence indivuals in popualtion depsite the density. So no matter what the popaultion size , it will impact the particular popualtion the same way. (Eg: tsunami, earthquake, etc)
« Last Edit: October 23, 2021, 08:53:47 pm by Lymphhh »
VCE :
2020: LOTE [40]
2021: Biology 3/4 [ ]
2022: Chem [ ], English [ ], Psychology [ ], Maths Meth [ ]

biology1234

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13738 on: October 30, 2021, 08:09:34 pm »
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Hey all,
I was wondering with reproductive human cloning would the clone be parent less.
thanks

biology1234

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13739 on: November 17, 2021, 05:03:34 pm »
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would the answer to this question be x- linked recessive.
thanks