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April 23, 2021, 02:48:59 pm

Author Topic: MMI Practice  (Read 3859 times)  Share 

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vox nihili

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MMI Practice
« on: December 23, 2017, 10:39:15 pm »
With MMIs fast approaching, thought it would be nice to post a few practice scenarios here. To get the most out of this, you should provide your answers to the question in written format. The purpose of this exercise is to help you get into the habit of formulating your thinking and dealing with ethically challenging issues in a structured manner. It is my hope that this will stimulate some debate, which is a really great way to learn how to develop the right approach to MMI.
To be clear, these are written by me. Any similarities between these scenarios and past scenarios are purely coincidental.


Scenario

A friend asks you for a $1000 dollar loan.

Questions

1. What information would help you make a decision about whether to give the loan?
2. What are the relevant issues in this situation?
3. You decide not to give the loan, as your financial position prevents you from doing so. How do you discuss this with your friend?
4. Your friend confesses that they need the money, as they have accrued a gambling debt. How does this change your approach?
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cookiedream

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Re: MMI Practice
« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2017, 11:53:44 pm »
1. What information would help you make a decision about whether to give the loan?
2. What are the relevant issues in this situation?
3. You decide not to give the loan, as your financial position prevents you from doing so. How do you discuss this with your friend?
4. Your friend confesses that they need the money, as they have accrued a gambling debt. How does this change your approach?

Awesome idea, vox nihili!!!

Here are my answers (from the top of my head). Ahhhhhh I'm so scared about the MMI  :'(:'(:'(

1.
- For what reason are they asking me for a loan?
- Have we done this before/is this the first time that this has been happening? What was the situation like then?
- Who is affected? Is it only them, or does it include their family, etc.?
- Do I trust this friend? How close am I with this 'friend'?
- How urgently do they need this loan? (e.g. is it to help fund their sister's surgery? is it to buy a new car when they already have one?)
- Am I the only person from whom they are asking this loan for?

2.
- I may not be able to pay the loan at this current moment/I may not have 1000 dollars right now
- I may not trust this friend enough to give a loan/trust them with my money/trust them with paying back the loan
- I don't know enough about the situation to make a fully-informed decision (is this even a legit issue idek)

3.
Maybe over text or a phone call, arrange a meet up with them (maybe over a coffee?). Start off like a general convo, with a greeting and something like 'How's everything so far?' or 'How has Person X been? Are they doing better?' to establish some sort of a rapport. Then gently head into the topic, with something like 'Hey, you know how you asked me for a loan the other day?' then 'I'm really sorry, but I don't think I'll be able to give you the loan. You see, I'm not going too good regarding my own financial circumstances. I really hope you understand.'. After this, I'd have an in-depth discussion with them about the context of asking me for a loan (if I don't know these things already, in this situation - such as the reason), ensuring that I empathise with their situation wherever I can. Finally, we'll discuss services like Centrelink and bank loans that can potentially be of benefit for them, as well as being there for them as a friend and telling them to remain in contact with me/update me. If there's any other way I could help, I'll offer my assistance.

4.
- By having this extra information (them accruing a gambling debt), it changes my approach largely in the aspect that it is a dire situation and that it has to be dealt with accordingly and taken very seriously
- First of all, it's important to gather more information about their situation. How big is this debt, exactly? For how long has this debt been going on? How much of an impact has this debt had on them and their family? Have they sought support before approaching me/am I the first and only person to know this?
- As their friend, I should be there to help and support them in times of need - this aligns with my values and nature as well. But I should also be aware of the potential consequences that certain courses of action may have. For instance, if I help them without another thought, they are likely to be coming back again and again - which disadvantages my financial position and worsen their gambling addiction, if he's at that stage, and if not may provoke a gambling addiction. If I don't help them, I may be putting them and their family in danger of bankruptcy (which comes with other consequences, like not being able to afford rent or mortgage) and I may lose a friend.
- My approach would largely be the same, as I would have a thorough conversation with the friend whilst providing emotional support. It must be a heavily stressful time for them, so comfort is necessary to help navigate any negotiations that must be made.
- I would direct them to the many gambling assistance services out there and ensure that they get sufficient support that will not only help them get out of their current physical circumstances, but also prevent future circumstances like this. I'd want to keep in touch as much as possible especially during the early stages of recovery.
- If I and the friend deem it appropriate, the friend's inner family members (i.e. partner? parents?) should be informed so that they can continuously provide support for them from a closer angle. Sometimes informing others may not be the most suitable of decisions, particularly if there's a risk that the friend may not receive the help and support they deserve and instead their mental health may be adversely affected. For instance, they may be ostracised by their parents or their partner might leave them, etc etc.
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vox nihili

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Re: MMI Practice
« Reply #2 on: December 24, 2017, 01:18:22 pm »
Awesome idea, vox nihili!!!

Here are my answers (from the top of my head). Ahhhhhh I'm so scared about the MMI  :'(:'(:'(

1.
- For what reason are they asking me for a loan?
- Have we done this before/is this the first time that this has been happening? What was the situation like then?
- Who is affected? Is it only them, or does it include their family, etc.?
- Do I trust this friend? How close am I with this 'friend'?
- How urgently do they need this loan? (e.g. is it to help fund their sister's surgery? is it to buy a new car when they already have one?)
- Am I the only person from whom they are asking this loan for?

2.
- I may not be able to pay the loan at this current moment/I may not have 1000 dollars right now
- I may not trust this friend enough to give a loan/trust them with my money/trust them with paying back the loan
- I don't know enough about the situation to make a fully-informed decision (is this even a legit issue idek)

3.
Maybe over text or a phone call, arrange a meet up with them (maybe over a coffee?). Start off like a general convo, with a greeting and something like 'How's everything so far?' or 'How has Person X been? Are they doing better?' to establish some sort of a rapport. Then gently head into the topic, with something like 'Hey, you know how you asked me for a loan the other day?' then 'I'm really sorry, but I don't think I'll be able to give you the loan. You see, I'm not going too good regarding my own financial circumstances. I really hope you understand.'. After this, I'd have an in-depth discussion with them about the context of asking me for a loan (if I don't know these things already, in this situation - such as the reason), ensuring that I empathise with their situation wherever I can. Finally, we'll discuss services like Centrelink and bank loans that can potentially be of benefit for them, as well as being there for them as a friend and telling them to remain in contact with me/update me. If there's any other way I could help, I'll offer my assistance.

4.
- By having this extra information (them accruing a gambling debt), it changes my approach largely in the aspect that it is a dire situation and that it has to be dealt with accordingly and taken very seriously
- First of all, it's important to gather more information about their situation. How big is this debt, exactly? For how long has this debt been going on? How much of an impact has this debt had on them and their family? Have they sought support before approaching me/am I the first and only person to know this?
- As their friend, I should be there to help and support them in times of need - this aligns with my values and nature as well. But I should also be aware of the potential consequences that certain courses of action may have. For instance, if I help them without another thought, they are likely to be coming back again and again - which disadvantages my financial position and worsen their gambling addiction, if he's at that stage, and if not may provoke a gambling addiction. If I don't help them, I may be putting them and their family in danger of bankruptcy (which comes with other consequences, like not being able to afford rent or mortgage) and I may lose a friend.
- My approach would largely be the same, as I would have a thorough conversation with the friend whilst providing emotional support. It must be a heavily stressful time for them, so comfort is necessary to help navigate any negotiations that must be made.
- I would direct them to the many gambling assistance services out there and ensure that they get sufficient support that will not only help them get out of their current physical circumstances, but also prevent future circumstances like this. I'd want to keep in touch as much as possible especially during the early stages of recovery.
- If I and the friend deem it appropriate, the friend's inner family members (i.e. partner? parents?) should be informed so that they can continuously provide support for them from a closer angle. Sometimes informing others may not be the most suitable of decisions, particularly if there's a risk that the friend may not receive the help and support they deserve and instead their mental health may be adversely affected. For instance, they may be ostracised by their parents or their partner might leave them, etc etc.


Interesting answers. Will try to give others an opportunity to respond before I jump in with anything.

I think you've highlighted the critical things. You've managed to protect your own interests whilst also dig into why your friend is in this kind of trouble.
2013-15: BBiomed (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology), UniMelb
2016-20: MD, UniMelb
2019-20: MPH, UniMelb
2021-: GDipBiostat, USyd