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August 02, 2021, 01:14:58 pm

Author Topic: Crime essay structures  (Read 1890 times)  Share 

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emilyyyyyyy

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Crime essay structures
« on: October 21, 2019, 03:05:33 pm »
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Hi all,

How would you structure an essay on sentencing and punishment, and international law? Like what would the paras be based on?
My notes are so limited and I literally cannot find anything :(

Thanks!

hemlock

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Re: Crime essay structures
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2019, 02:44:28 pm »
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Hi all,

How would you structure an essay on sentencing and punishment, and international law? Like what would the paras be based on?
My notes are so limited and I literally cannot find anything :(

Thanks!

Hi Emily,
It might depend on the question what paragraphs you would want to include, but generally you should have an essay plan for the six sections of the syllabus. Don't worry about writing too much - it's only 15 marks, and you should save your time for the Option essays. I've structured mine based on law reform, since that's what it's projected to be, although they can be easily adapted to the specifics of the question.

Also try searching in the HSC Notes section of the ATARNotes website with relevant keywords, so 'international' or 'sentencing and punishment', because there are some really good essay plans on it.

Here's my essay plan for sentencing and punishment:
Paragraph 1 - Mandatory Sentencing
- R v Loveridge (2013)
- Crimes (Sentencing and Procedure) Act 1999 (NSW) - mandatory sentencing removes judicial discretion
- Crimes and Other Legislation (Assault and Intoxication) Act 2012 (NSW)
- Violates right to trial for individual crime (ICCPR)
- Find media article on mandatory sentencing

Paragraph 2 - VICTIM IMPACT STATEMENTS - The Role of the Victim in Sentencing
- Introduce Victim Impact Statements (VIS)
- Sentencing Procedure Act 1999 (NSW) provides that all victims of crimes that result in the ‘actual bodily harm’ of a person are enshrined to vitally give a VIS in the sentencing process, though the legal weight of these has varied.
-  R v Slack (2004) + R v Aguirre (2010) [case law reform]
- Crimes (Sentencing Procedure) Amendment (Victim Impact Statements) Act 2004 (NSW).
- Find a media article arguing against VIS - that they should not dictate the sentence of the victim
- Consider statistic on VIS

Paragraph 3 - Alternative Methods of Sentencing
- Children (Detention Centres) Act 1987 (NSW) - Downsides of Control Orders and JJCs (there is an overlap with Young Offenders here, which can make it easier to remember stuff)
         - Statistic on reoffending rates among young offenders
- Youth Justice Conferences (YJCs)
      - Under Young Offenders Act 1987 (NSW), YJCs critically reflect society’s moral and ethical standard that control orders could threaten children’s recidivism chances and their education.
- Circle sentencing for Indigenous offenders
     - Robert Bolt (2002)
- Media article
 
Good luck and don't stress too much! :)