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June 24, 2017, 03:10:54 am

Author Topic: Advice for Literature Students  (Read 13609 times)  Share 

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kandinsky

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Re: Advice for Literature Students
« Reply #15 on: September 08, 2014, 12:58:28 pm »
+1
The morning of the exam - eat a good breakfast, listen to some music, and...go nuts in the exam room.

charmanderp

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Re: Advice for Literature Students
« Reply #16 on: September 11, 2014, 05:38:38 pm »
+1
Using clear and uncomplicated language to express your ideas/arguments is far more important than trying to use unnecessarily complicated words to impress the examiner.

Watch this for clarity:
University of Melbourne - Bachelor of Arts majoring in English, Economics and International Studies (2013 onwards)

coconut stripes

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Re: Advice for Literature Students
« Reply #17 on: October 12, 2015, 07:16:13 pm »
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Help?! I have no idea how to set up a passage analysis essay. I've gotten really good marks for lit all year but I just don't know how to go about doing this particular task.
My teacher has given me feedback on a practice,  and says that I seem to 'not be in control of my ideas', which I'm guessing means that I jump to and fro a lot.
I know structure isn't a big part of lit, but if someone could give me any advice on how to set up my essay,  it would be much, much appreciated.

ruby174k

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Re: Advice for Literature Students
« Reply #18 on: October 22, 2015, 10:07:17 pm »
+1
Help?! I have no idea how to set up a passage analysis essay. I've gotten really good marks for lit all year but I just don't know how to go about doing this particular task.
My teacher has given me feedback on a practice,  and says that I seem to 'not be in control of my ideas', which I'm guessing means that I jump to and fro a lot.
I know structure isn't a big part of lit, but if someone could give me any advice on how to set up my essay,  it would be much, much appreciated.


I feel you! My Lit teacher said that it's always good to dive right into a paragraph (no intro) and start off with a quote if you are unsure. Although VCAA examiner reports always suggest that doing smaller paragraphs is a good idea my school usually sticks to 3 (which seems to work because students last year got 40+ study scores just doing 3 paras). But in hindsight structure doesn't really matter if you have got the 'right' structure because it is the analysis of language and the depth of your ideas that count!

clarke54321

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Re: Advice for Literature Students
« Reply #19 on: July 10, 2016, 09:47:01 pm »
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Afternoon All,
Just a general sideline tip, if you can get your hands (or your computer) on a copy of the old VATE Literature Perspectives you may find it extremely beneficial. I'm going to attach the 2014 copy that I have from my sister as it has some of the books featured in our exam texts for 2016, I hope they help you the way they have helped me.
NOTE: I have had to make them into single book PDFs as the files are too large!, I will be attaching 1 to this and posting the others to follow
Have a lovely day : )

Thanks very much for this! I will be studying 'A Doll's House' next year for Lit 3/4, so this will be very beneficial.  :)
2016: Legal Studies  |  Further Maths

2017: English  |  Literature  |  Math Methods  |  German


For any corrections on VCE Legal Studies questions feel free to PM me

gfet

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Re: Advice for Literature Students
« Reply #20 on: January 10, 2017, 07:21:29 pm »
+3
Hey all, I didn't want to make a new thread for just this one question and it relates to general advice for all literature students...

What do we do about introductions and conclusions? Do we leave them out all together or just throw in a one or two line intro and conclusion?

I absolutely agree that neither an introduction nor conclusion are necessary. It is ideal to jump straight into analysis and waste no time summarising what you are about to say or have said already. The examiners do not require any information about what you are going to discuss, if anything I would say they prefer not to have it! They want to know you are thinking as you go. However, it's sometimes a bit hard to get started, so a one or two line conclusion might be a good way to get your own thoughts flowing.

A conclusion isn't needed either, because you should be effectively wrapping up every one of your points at the end of the paragraph. The best way to end an essay is with a 'concluding air', a pithy sentence that sums up your final point and leaves a lasting impression in the examiner's mind. That being said, this can be difficult, and if you have the time for a fleshed-out conclusion, then go for it, just as long as it doesn't sound too generic or pre-planned.

Confusedprincess

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Re: Advice for Literature Students
« Reply #21 on: March 13, 2017, 05:35:27 pm »
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Are Views, Values and Contexts still a part of the new study design as an assessment piece?

literally lauren

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Re: Advice for Literature Students
« Reply #22 on: March 24, 2017, 11:37:25 am »
+1
Are Views, Values and Contexts still a part of the new study design as an assessment piece?
That SAC has kind of been combined with the 'Alternate Views' one to form the new 'Literary Perspectives' task, which is 50% of Unit 4 and 50% of the exam. It's also changed to involve particular emphasis on certain readings or schools of thought (e.g. feminist, Marxist, post-colonial, post-modern, etc.) and will require you to reference specific literary critics' interpretations :)