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April 27, 2017, 10:57:07 pm

Author Topic: Looking toward 2017: ask your Psych questions here  (Read 2452 times)  Share 

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Joseph41

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your Psych questions here
« Reply #15 on: December 20, 2016, 11:39:35 am »
+1
hi :)
In regards to the course, did you find that certain topics were more prevalent in exams/more important or is it all pretty equal?
Thanks!

Hey there, Mooshkat! ;D

This is quite a common question, particularly toward the exam period, but I'm afraid my answer is going to be fairly blasť (I'm not sure if I'm using that word in the right way haha):

Each year, different topics seem to be emphasised in the exam. Like, some years some of the seemingly dominant topics will be seldom tested. But then other years, that same topic might account for a considerable portion of the exam. I haven't tested it or anything like that, but I'd contend that over time, most things are tested fairly equally.

And, ultimately, the best way to be prepared for the exam is to know everything in the course front to back! ;D

Does that answer your question?
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Hydroxyl

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your Psych questions here
« Reply #16 on: January 01, 2017, 02:11:52 pm »
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Hey @Joseph41!

What exactly has changed with the 2017 Study Design? I don't see much has changed and the 2016 course notes seem to be matching the new study design. Anything new added in or taken out?

Thank Youu!
« Last Edit: January 01, 2017, 02:20:16 pm by Hydroxyl »
2016: Biology [XLI] | Further Mathematics [XLII]
2017: English | Mathematical Methods | Chemistry | Psychology

Joseph41

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your Psych questions here
« Reply #17 on: January 01, 2017, 02:39:01 pm »
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Hey @Joseph41!

What exactly has changed with the 2017 Study Design? I don't see much has changed and the 2016 course notes seem to be matching the new study design. Anything new added in or taken out?

Thank Youu!

Hey Hydroxyl,

I'm at the cricket so replying from my phone, but is this thread of any use?

A summary of changes to the 2017+ study design
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Hydroxyl

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your Psych questions here
« Reply #18 on: January 01, 2017, 03:00:58 pm »
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Hey Hydroxyl,

I'm at the cricket so replying from my phone, but is this thread of any use?

A summary of changes to the 2017+ study design

Thank you!! Seems great :D
2016: Biology [XLI] | Further Mathematics [XLII]
2017: English | Mathematical Methods | Chemistry | Psychology

Joseph41

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your Psych questions here
« Reply #19 on: January 01, 2017, 03:15:54 pm »
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Thank you!! Seems great :D

Not a problem! Is that what you meant, though? :)
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EdwinaB19

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your Psych questions here
« Reply #20 on: January 09, 2017, 04:00:52 pm »
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Hi,

I'm picking up psych 3/4 this year without doing 1/2. I've managed to get the new textbook.
(-I've started summarising chapters and making cue cards for key terms)

Apart from reviewing research methods, what can I do to catch up and from there get ahead?

Tildaf98

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your Psych questions here
« Reply #21 on: January 10, 2017, 05:12:34 am »
+1
Hi,

I'm picking up psych 3/4 this year without doing 1/2. I've managed to get the new textbook.
(-I've started summarising chapters and making cue cards for key terms

Apart from reviewing research methods, what can I do to catch up and from there get ahead?

Hi Edwina! :)

Definitely a great idea to get started on reviewing research methods because that is pretty much the only content that transfers over from 1/2 to 3/4.
Similarly, it's good to have a solid understanding of the neutron- I think particularly with the new changes with the study design.

I'd also recommend having a read through the study design and perhaps just show some focus on the changes from the study design. Go check out different resources and read up on these topics!

When I did psych in 2015, I found that it was more a transfer of skills as opposed to content. The way you go about answering questions and understanding how to allocate marks is a fundamental tool to have in psych. So I would suggest having a flick through the short answers of previous exams and then taking note of the vcaa exam solutions!

By the sounds of things, I think you'll be ace! The very best of luck :)
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Joseph41

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your Psych questions here
« Reply #22 on: February 03, 2017, 03:00:47 pm »
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As above, I think if you're fairly comfortable with research methods somewhere near the start of the year, you're doing pretty well!

This is speculation, but I reckon it'd be a decent tactic to focus on completely new areas of the study design. As I say, complete speculation, but new area = fewer resources = more underprepared students = advantage for you (VCAA is sure to test at least some of the new areas).

What do others think about this? :)
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Butterflygirl

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your Psych questions here
« Reply #23 on: February 06, 2017, 04:34:11 pm »
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Hi!

For psych, is it necessary to memorise definitions like for health? If yes, can you please give me a general gist of what type of definitions?

Thanks!

Joseph41

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your Psych questions here
« Reply #24 on: February 06, 2017, 04:46:13 pm »
+1
Hi!

For psych, is it necessary to memorise definitions like for health? If yes, can you please give me a general gist of what type of definitions?

Thanks!

I definitely wouldn't say to the same extent as HHD. Like, Health sort of requires word-for-word definitions. Although there's also heaps of content in Psych, IMO you need to know concepts more than definitions. I mean, you totally have to know what stratified sampling is, but I think it's unlikely to get a question along the lines of "Define stratified sampling (1 mark)", as you might in HHD. :)

To sum that up, I think you need to know a lot of stuff in Psych, but not necessarily word-for-word definitions.
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nt2387

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your Psych questions here
« Reply #25 on: February 09, 2017, 11:09:44 am »
+1
Hi!

For psych, is it necessary to memorise definitions like for health? If yes, can you please give me a general gist of what type of definitions?

Thanks!

You really don't see many 'define' questions in 3/4 Psychology. I don't actually remember needing to know word for word definitions for anything. That being said, I do think it is important to know the key elements in a definition because assessors look for these in 'explain' questions.

VCAA have tried to move away from the 'lower order' questions in Psychology and have attempted to implement more application type questions where they give you a scenario and you have to apply your knowledge rather than just regurgitate it.


I hope this helps!
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Joseph41

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your Psych questions here
« Reply #26 on: February 18, 2017, 01:27:33 pm »
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VCAA have tried to move away from the 'lower order' questions in Psychology and have attempted to implement more application type questions where they give you a scenario and you have to apply your knowledge rather than just regurgitate it.

Yeah, I think you've hit the nail on the head, nt2387 - you definitely need to know the concepts, but probably not word-for-word definitions. :)
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Butterflygirl

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your Psych questions here
« Reply #27 on: March 07, 2017, 06:50:29 pm »
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Hii, I have a question...

In a neuron, my school notes say that the whole axon is not myelinated, just each "node", but I thought the nodes where the gaps?
So how does myelination actually speed up the transmission of neural messages if the gaps aren't myelinated?


Thanks! :)

seth

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your Psych questions here
« Reply #28 on: March 07, 2017, 07:28:08 pm »
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Hii, I have a question...

In a neuron, my school notes say that the whole axon is not myelinated, just each "node", but I thought the nodes where the gaps?
So how does myelination actually speed up the transmission of neural messages if the gaps aren't myelinated?


Thanks! :)

From my knowledge, the axon is not myelinated throughout its entire length. The gaps where it isn't are called nodes of ranvier, whereas the portion where it is, is called the myelin sheath. Both the nodes and sheath is said to speed up transmission; the sheath by insulating the axon and increasing nerve impulse, and the nodes by allowing the neural message to jump from node to node, as opposed to it travelling slower in a constant path through the axon.
« Last Edit: March 07, 2017, 07:30:28 pm by seth »

Butterflygirl

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your Psych questions here
« Reply #29 on: March 07, 2017, 07:44:44 pm »
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From my knowledge, the axon is not myelinated throughout its entire length. The gaps where it isn't are called nodes of ranvier, whereas the portion where it is, is called the myelin sheath. Both the nodes and sheath is said to speed up transmission; the sheath by insulating the axon and increasing nerve impulse, and the nodes by allowing the neural message to jump from node to node, as opposed to it travelling slower in a constant path through the axon.

Ohh okay but why does the neural message jump from one node (node of ranvier) to the next? Or do you mean it jumps from myelin sheath to myelin sheath? because its the insulated segment of the axon?

Thanks again! :)