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January 21, 2017, 05:04:38 am

Author Topic: Looking toward 2017: ask your English Language questions here  (Read 1086 times)  Share 

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exit

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your English Language questions here
« Reply #15 on: December 20, 2016, 09:43:38 pm »
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Howdy, exit! :)

I'm not sure I quite follow the question (explanations of what?), but to be honest, you don't need much else. Examiners won't be marking you highly for using fancy words; they'll be marking you highly for being clear.



Hey Joseph,

Thanks for the reply. I was thinking there would be more words like 'interlocutor' that are commonly used in EngLang essays. But I guess not!

What resources are available to practice discourse analysis and short answer questions? There are practice exams as well as the green 'exam guide', but are they truly enough? I was wondering also if it's a good use of time to resubmit essays after correction from the teacher, striving for something perfect.
2016: Methods:[45] German:[33]
2017:  EngLang, Specialist Maths, Chem, Accounting, Physics

Joseph41

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your English Language questions here
« Reply #16 on: December 20, 2016, 09:51:02 pm »
+1
Hey Joseph,

Thanks for the reply. I was thinking there would be more words like 'interlocutor' that are commonly used in EngLang essays. But I guess not!

Right, right - I see what you mean now. Interlocutor is a good one, but I'll have a think and get back to you (I tried thinking just then but I'm too distracted by the cricket hahaha).

Quote
What resources are available to practice discourse analysis and short answer questions? There are practice exams as well as the green 'exam guide', but are they truly enough? I was wondering also if it's a good use of time to resubmit essays after correction from the teacher, striving for something perfect.

Yeah! I absolutely love this method; I think it's really, really useful.

Put it this way: I'd rather submit an essay, get feedback, improve it, submit it again, get feedback, improve it, and submit it for a third time, than write three new essays (I hope that sentence made sense). I just think you learn so much more by actively addressing your mistakes, and it gives you great insight into what a really, really good piece of work looks like. And the more you do that, the more natural it becomes to produce that quality of work the first time around. :)
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Joseph41

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your English Language questions here
« Reply #17 on: December 23, 2016, 10:19:11 am »
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Hey Joseph,

Thanks for the reply. I was thinking there would be more words like 'interlocutor' that are commonly used in EngLang essays. But I guess not!

What resources are available to practice discourse analysis and short answer questions? There are practice exams as well as the green 'exam guide', but are they truly enough? I was wondering also if it's a good use of time to resubmit essays after correction from the teacher, striving for something perfect.

I was thinking about this last night when I remembered that VCAA actually lists a whole bunch of terms! They may not be exactly what you're talking about, but it's certainly a good start to be very familiar with these concepts (further to the metalanguage specifically listed under the subsystems):

Spoiler
- register
- overt and covert norms
- Standard and non-Standard English
- political correctness
- jargon
- slang
- colloquial language/colloquialisms
- double-speak
- taboo language
- public language
- rhetoric
- positive and negative face needs
- situational context
- cultural context
- social purpose
- ethnolect; sociolect; idiolect

Source: study design, page 18.

Feel free to clarify anything here. :)
I'll be relatively inactive until mid-February. Please remind me after that time if I've not responded to your PM. :)

H o w  V C E  W o r k s

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to trust - to hold - to care

Joseph41

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your English Language questions here
« Reply #18 on: December 24, 2016, 04:27:20 pm »
+1
Apologies for the triple post; I'll merge them when somebody replies.

But I just found this resource, which looks great and I'm sure would go some way to answering the question(s) above. :)
I'll be relatively inactive until mid-February. Please remind me after that time if I've not responded to your PM. :)

H o w  V C E  W o r k s

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peanut

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your English Language questions here
« Reply #19 on: January 02, 2017, 04:18:16 pm »
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Hi,
Thanks everyone (especially Joseph41) for putting out all these English Language resources. I have a quick question:
What "name" is given to these things? I always see them grouped together, so I figured there might be a collective name for all of them.
Function, field, mode, setting and audience (including the relationships between participants)
2016: Biology [48] | Maths Methods [43]
2017: Chemistry | English Language | Specialist Maths | Physics

Joseph41

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your English Language questions here
« Reply #20 on: January 02, 2017, 07:26:10 pm »
+1
Hi,
Thanks everyone (especially Joseph41) for putting out all these English Language resources. I have a quick question:
What "name" is given to these things? I always see them grouped together, so I figured there might be a collective name for all of them.
Function, field, mode, setting and audience (including the relationships between participants)

Hey peanut,

No problem! The EngLang board was a little sparse, do you not think? ;)

I'm not really aware of a specific term, to be honest - does it specify one in the study design? Otherwise, I think contextual factors would probably suffice. I mean, these are all the types of thing that you'd include in an introduction to an analytical commentary, and they're all sort of setting the scene, as it were.

What do others think? :)
I'll be relatively inactive until mid-February. Please remind me after that time if I've not responded to your PM. :)

H o w  V C E  W o r k s

a reason to live and a reason to grow -
to trust - to hold - to care

mtDNA

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your English Language questions here
« Reply #21 on: January 10, 2017, 10:51:30 pm »
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Hey, I just wanted to ask what the difference is between a phoneme and a phone? The current definition I have is:
Phone: the smallest structural unit of sound that is produced in an utterance
Phoneme: the smallest unit of sound that can produce contrasts (?)

But with these definitions, I don't really understand the difference...  :-\

Thanks in advance  ;)
2016: Biology [46]
2017: English language [ ], Chemistry [ ], Mathematical Methods [ ], Specialist Mathematics [ ], Further Mathematics [ ]

dan0038

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your English Language questions here
« Reply #22 on: January 13, 2017, 05:53:31 pm »
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does anyone have any links to past practice exams for english language that isn't from VCAA? Cheers

peanut

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your English Language questions here
« Reply #23 on: January 14, 2017, 06:44:35 pm »
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According to VCAA, does register refer to the level of formality or the specific variety of a language used for a particular purpose? For example would "highly informal" or "legal English" be a register?
2016: Biology [48] | Maths Methods [43]
2017: Chemistry | English Language | Specialist Maths | Physics

Individu

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your English Language questions here
« Reply #24 on: January 14, 2017, 08:58:29 pm »
+1
Register is essentially the degree of formality. The text's register is influenced by contextual factors such as the interlocutors involved (e.g. are they close friends or is there a level of social distance?), the setting (court, school etc.) and some other factors.

'Legal english' or legalese would be a type of jargon - a specialised type of language used amongst people of a certain field or hobby. Examples include medical jargon and gamer language. Different types of jargon have different registers - legalese and medical jargon would have a formal register whilst gamer language tends to be more informal.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2017, 09:05:25 pm by Individu »
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2016: Methods, Specialist, Chemistry, English Language, Extension Chemistry

mtDNA

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Re: Looking toward 2017: ask your English Language questions here
« Reply #25 on: January 17, 2017, 12:53:18 pm »
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In regards to finding quotes for section C, are there any recommended linguistic books to read? I've heard of Mother Tongue, Mastering Advanced English Language, etc., but are they really worth it? If so, which ones are the best resource? Moreover, what are the alternative methods for finding quotes?

Thanks in Advance  :D
2016: Biology [46]
2017: English language [ ], Chemistry [ ], Mathematical Methods [ ], Specialist Mathematics [ ], Further Mathematics [ ]