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February 20, 2017, 05:09:31 pm

Author Topic: How university works  (Read 30231 times)  Share 

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Stick

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Re: How university works
« Reply #15 on: June 30, 2013, 12:39:19 pm »
0
Thanks.

And one more very jaffy query. :P How do you take down adequate notes during a lecture?
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Shenz0r

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Re: How university works
« Reply #16 on: June 30, 2013, 12:54:13 pm »
+1
Some people bring their laptops/tablets and write notes during the lecture. I prefer to print off the lecture slides beforehand and annotate them during the lecture, and then summarise then later on.

If the lecture is recorded, you can go back and review it.
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Re: How university works
« Reply #17 on: June 30, 2013, 01:11:59 pm »
+3
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Re: How university works
« Reply #18 on: June 30, 2013, 01:56:58 pm »
+2
Thanks.

And one more very jaffy query. :P How do you take down adequate notes during a lecture?
I don't take notes in lectures, beyond maybe a couple of dotpoints on stuff I might want to look up later. All my lectures were recorded, so I could always go back and review them though. Not to give the wrong impression about how much detail a lecture will provide, but I generally thought of them to be providing a springboard for what you're then supposed to go and learn more about. After going to the lecture, it'd probably mean going to the library (or using the internet) to look things up further.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2013, 02:00:09 pm by Lazyred »

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Re: How university works
« Reply #19 on: June 30, 2013, 02:05:40 pm »
+1
Thanks.

And one more very jaffy query. :P How do you take down adequate notes during a lecture?

Sometimes I find its best not to take notes in lectures, particularly if the content is difficult and the lecture is recorded. This way, 1) you can focus better on what the lecturer is saying rather than trying to scribe down everything they say (I.e. me for the first week of semester :-\) and 2) you can always revisit the lectures online to make notes.

As far as I've heard, the majority of lectures are recorded at Monash.
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BigAl

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Re: How university works
« Reply #20 on: June 30, 2013, 02:34:56 pm »
+1
Thanks.

And one more very jaffy query. :P How do you take down adequate notes during a lecture?

I'm sorry this never happens especially in engineering...there are pre lecture notes for some of the units..you download them into your laptop, tablet etc and follow the lecture..from third or fourth week, I decided not to take notes in phs1011 unless I heard that voice "highlight it, put it into a box" I will never ever forget that voice :) any phs1011 fellow will understand what I mean
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alondouek

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Re: How university works
« Reply #21 on: June 30, 2013, 02:38:56 pm »
+3
Suggested addition:

How do I study for exams?

Exam at university are quite different from those in VCE, in that they are significantly more dependent on independent learning abilities. You're unlikely to be given many practice exams for a subject, and often the exams that you are given access to for practice do not contain solutions - though this depends on the course coordinator and subject to an extent.

Given that exams are based on lectures and readings, it's often useful to summarise the lectures and readings until the content is well understood. Usually (especially for sciences), the exam questions are very similar to those given in tutorials and other exercises throughout the semester. It's a good idea to be able to do these questions and questions like them independently, with a sound knowledge of the theory behind it.

Some people also find it useful to study in groups, where people can pose questions to each other and discuss the subject material.

Because of the difference between the learning styles required for VCE exams and uni exams, you may initially find it difficult to find a means of independent study. This can be frustrating at first, but it's important not to be disheartened, as you'll eventually find a mode of study that works for you. It's just another part of the university learning experience.
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simpak

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Re: How university works
« Reply #22 on: June 30, 2013, 03:33:50 pm »
+6
I take a lot of notes during lectures...
Correct answer is: attend lecture, see what works for you.
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Re: How university works
« Reply #23 on: June 30, 2013, 05:02:35 pm »
0
I'm sorry this never happens especially in engineering...there are pre lecture notes for some of the units..you download them into your laptop, tablet etc and follow the lecture..from third or fourth week, I decided not to take notes in phs1011 unless I heard that voice "highlight it, put it into a box" I will never ever forget that voice :) any phs1011 fellow will understand what I mean
For engineering, I wouldn't call them notes :P, rather a couple of pages full of scribbles and diagrams with numbers and greek symbols all over the place, with arrows, vectors and forces hidden beneath and between all of that somewhere.

Some people can learn well without taking any notes down at all, and just take it all in, others will benefit from writing everything down neatly and nicely. As simpak has said, just find what works best for you. This isn't VC anymore, no one is there to babysit you into how to learn (or even exactly what to learn half the time). It's all up to you now.
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Dejan

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Re: How university works
« Reply #24 on: June 30, 2013, 06:39:34 pm »
0
Could you explain the grades that can be achieved and or any other university terminology that people in uni  would be unfamiliar about?

simpak

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Re: How university works
« Reply #25 on: June 30, 2013, 06:56:20 pm »
0
Not every university uses the same grading system though.
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alondouek

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Re: How university works
« Reply #26 on: June 30, 2013, 06:59:33 pm »
+6
Grading in university is, in my eyes, a lot simpler than in VCE. I've heard that in some units, there is standardisation to a bell-curve, but I don't know how frequent that is.

Basically, unit grades are made up of your assessed in-semester work and your exam (if applicable - some units, often Arts, have essays and the like instead).

At Monash (and I presume most Australian unis), grading works like this, possibly with some minor differences:
CodeGradeMarkGPA Value
HDHigh Distinction80-1004
DDistinction70-793
CCredit60-692
PPass50-591
NPNear Pass (no longer valid at Monash)45-490.7
NFail0-490.3
WNWithdrawn Fail (where you have withdrawn from a unit after the cut-off date)0
SFRSatisfied Faculty Requirements
NENot Examinable
NASNot Assessed

UoM has a different scheme, however:
CodeGradeMarkExplanation
H1First-Class Honours80-100
H2ASecond Class Honours Division A75-79
H2BSecond Class Honours Division B70-74
H3Third Class Honours65-69
PPass50-64
NFail0-49No credit points are awarded.
CMPCompletedPass (no mark awarded). Only used for subjects marked on a pass/fail basis.
CNTContinuingUsed for subjects that run over more than one teaching period, and the subject has not been completed.
CTCContinuing CompletedUsed for each teaching period (except for the final teaching period) where a student has been enrolled in and passed a continuing subject. The final mark and grade awarded for the subject will be entered against the final teaching period of enrolment in the continuing subject.
CNFContinuing -
Fail
Used for each teaching period (except for the final teaching period) where a student has been enrolled in and failed a continuing subject. The final mark and grade awarded for the subject will be entered against the final teaching period of enrolment in the continuing subject.
FLFailFail (no mark awarded) Only used for subjects marked on a pass/fail basis.
NHNot Completed/Fail0-49Used when a student fails as they have not satisfactorily completed all prescribed (hurdle) requirements and would otherwise have passed the subject. A mark of 0-49% will appear on the transcript.
WDWithdrawnWithdrawn from a subject after the time for making subject changes without penalty has passed (after census date).
NANot AssessedUsed for subjects that are non-assessable, such as Community Access Program audit studies.
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Dejan

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Re: How university works
« Reply #27 on: June 30, 2013, 07:05:50 pm »
+2
Oh it all makes so much sense now, god this thread is amazing <3

Starlight

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Re: How university works
« Reply #28 on: June 30, 2013, 07:31:23 pm »
+6
Thought i'd describe chemistry tutorials.

I'd say they differ quite a bit from first year to second year. During first year they sort of give you like 5 minutes to go through a question before the tutor goes through it with the whole class. For second year it's more like the tutor pretty much goes through everything from the moment the class begins. They are definitely helpful and there are opportunities to ask questions during/ at the end of the tute or alternatively make an appointment with your tutor. The tutors usually change for different sections e.g. the tutor I had for inorganic chemistry was different from organic etc. In terms of class size there's about 20-25 students and they often give a few options for which time/ date suits you. If you have the chance it's worth going through the questions before the tutorial.
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Re: How university works
« Reply #29 on: June 30, 2013, 07:56:03 pm »
+5
Is it possible, pi, to make a short 'index' at the top of the post, with all the major headings/questions being clickable to go to that specific part of the post?

Math tutorials (Monash perspective):

You'll be in a room of about 8-14 other students, working on a problem set which will cover the topics that were discussed in the previous week of lectures. These tutorials generally last from 1.5-2 hours. The tutor will generally go through some of  the theory as a refresher, and may do a few problems to help you get the basics under your belt. You can talk with the people beside you, its not a test. The tutor is also available to answer any queries. Also, you will usually hand in assignments in the tute, and complete tests (if applicable) in the tute.

These tutorials aren't compulsory, but they helped a lot throughout the semester, because really, mathematics is a lot about doing problems, not memorising theory. Also, apparently, if you just failed the unit, your attendance in tutes can bump you up to a pass.

Chemistry tutorials (Monash perspective):

These usually contain more people (~70 people were enrolled in my session) but not many people show up (~maybe 15-20), as they aren't compulsory. These tutorials generally last an hour. There were two different styles of tutorials for chemistry: one involved the lecturer going through questions on a board, and the other involved tutors roaming the room, answering questions that people may have.

I found the lecturer solving problems more helpful, it shows you their thought process as they solve a problem, and what they expect. Tute questions are usually taken from past exams,so they can be a good indicator of what to expect on the exam.

Chemistry labs (Monash perspective):

These are usually 4 hours long and have anywhere between 20-50+ people, depending on the unit and the year level. These sessions usually require labcoats and safety goggles (some units just require the safety goggles). In first year chemistry, you will work in pairs. However, you may be required to do a presentation on a specific prac, which will consist of larger groups. In second year chemistry, there will be times you have to work alone, so don't always rely on your partner to do the hard work! You will need some basic lab skills.

You will usually conduct experiments as per the lab manual, with a demonstrator to explain all the steps at the start, and help you during the prac if necessary. Sometimes, you will synthesize compounds. Sometimes, you will analyse properties. Sometimes, you will separate stuff. (Check out this post for more details) Pracs will relate to topics covered in lectures - I noticed this more in second year than first year, where it was more 'vague'.

You will be required to complete a proforma (work-sheet type thing) or a lab report (depends on the unit) which is due on the day of your next lab session. Lab components are usually hurdles, meaning they need to be passed to pass the unit. There are usually pre-lab questions that must be completed before the lab session - they are signed by the demonstrator before the lab, and count for marks. In second year labs, you will need to fill in Safety & Hazard forms before the lab - these must be signed by the demonstrator as well.

First year Astronomy labs (Monash perspective):

These are usually 2 hours long and have between 8-12 people. These labs are really interesting because you do a variety of activities! Towards the start, you will learn the basics of reading star charts (forgive me Allan if I use wrong words :O ) and the terminology behind them - this can be a bit confusing if you're stupid like me, but it just takes practice. Then, other activities arise, such as constructing your own spectrometer, using telescopes to spy on the Menzies building (and burn stuff with the sun!), computer-related activities related to calculation of orbits/etc (forgotten, sorry) and lots of other cool stuff! There were also role playing activities, where you get to plan your crusade to a planet with a fixed budget with a group of people. There were a fair bunch of the 'calculation labs' but really, it ties in so well with the content in lectures that it is somewhat enjoyable (when it makes sense). I can say that first year astro labs were genuinely fun, it was something different every time.






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